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Just learned of this oldie, but still interesting.

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posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:06 PM
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An acquaintance of mine just mentioned how an object was discovered in a pond on his uncle's New Hampshire farm in 1977. The object was believed to be radioactive because it melted the pond in the dead of winter. I googled it and sure enough, I came up with this article. My acquaintance also informed me that his aunt had died of cancer and his uncle now has leukemia. Could these diseases have come from the object in the pond? I don't know, but the powers that be at that time sure seemed to be covering something up. Here's the article:

Wakefield, New Hampshire Incident
edit on 6/19/2013 by jiggerj because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:13 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


nice find

pity they didnt take photo's



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Very interesting, I haven't heard of this case before. Here is a another UFO incident that affected the health of the witnesses...


The Cash-Landrum Incident was a reported Unidentified Flying Object sighting from the United States in 1980, which witnesses insist was responsible for damage to their health. It is one of very few UFO cases to result in civil court proceedings.


Source



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:31 PM
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reply to post by WeRpeons
 


I remember digging into that one and came to the conclusion that either -
It was a military project that had run into problems (the helicopters that were escorting IT)
Or the military had recovered something they'd shot down.

Whatever it was, those people definitely suffered from radiation exposure. Do you know of any recent info concerning this case?

The OP's mystery certainly is odd. To melt through ice so quickly it must have been producing quite a lot of heat. How could it do that?



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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The object was believed to be radioactive because it melted the pond in the dead of winter.


Do radioactive materials heat water or melt ice? Ive not heard that before.

edit on 19-6-2013 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:39 PM
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Originally posted by PhoenixOD


The object was believed to be radioactive because it melted the pond in the dead of winter.


Do radioactive materials heat water or melt ice? Ive not heard that before.

edit on 19-6-2013 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)


Also, jet engines, hot metal, friction or fire also melt ice. Just sayin'. Oh...and heat. Heat also melts ice.
edit on 19-6-2013 by WilliamOckham because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:40 PM
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I'm a bit confused here. Now I'm no mathmagician but how does a square object melt a perfectly round hole in the ice? Square pegs do not go in round holes, that much I do know. That one part leaves me scratching my head because it doesn't quite add up.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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reply to post by WilliamOckham
 


Any space debris would be pretty hot and im sure would melt ice as well.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 07:02 PM
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Originally posted by EViLKoNCEPTz
I'm a bit confused here. Now I'm no mathmagician but how does a square object melt a perfectly round hole in the ice? Square pegs do not go in round holes, that much I do know. That one part leaves me scratching my head because it doesn't quite add up.


Ok, that one does it for me. This one was defiantly alien


Oh, and the way my iPad keyboard is jumping and stalling, the pesky critters don't want me to comment



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 07:09 PM
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Originally posted by EViLKoNCEPTz
I'm a bit confused here. Now I'm no mathmagician but how does a square object melt a perfectly round hole in the ice? Square pegs do not go in round holes, that much I do know. That one part leaves me scratching my head because it doesn't quite add up.


If you managed to melt a somewhat square hole in the middle of the lake, .....due to the thermal mass from the liquid water below the frozen surface, the (However minute) warmer termperature would rise and any sharp edges would melt away into a rounded blob. Assuming, there was a big round hole. Perfect round hole? I doubt it was perfectly round.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 07:33 PM
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reply to post by WilliamOckham
 


The article has it highlighted. It says perfectly round, which it what threw me off. I would expect a square object melting through ice to leave a some what more blocky hole than "perfectly round" more like 4 flatish sides with slightly rounded corners, instead of a circle. Plus with the ice supposedly being 14" thick it should also be wider at the surface from extended heat contact leaving slopes on the sides of the opening. Just seems weird to me.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 12:23 AM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Fascinating ! Thank you....



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 12:49 AM
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They dont call radioactive zones HOT for nothing. I remember a case in russia where hunters were using radioactive batteries that contained cobalt as pillows while sleeping out in the forest because they are WARM. Apparently the USSR had so many that they could be found scattered all over the place. Needless to say that their hair fell out shortly after and many suffered ill effects. i cant believe I,m typing this I mean really who would sleep on one of those things.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 09:30 AM
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Well even nuclear power plants essentially just use the heat generated from radioactive material to heat water to produce steam - like a good old fashioned electric power plant, just substituting radioactive rods in place of burning coal or gas to generate the steam that turns the turbines that generate the electricity that powers our civilization.

I think when I was a kid I thought that nuclear power plants somehow got power from either controlled mini nuclear explosions or perhaps even from radioactive material directly, just hook some wires up to some uranium and voila!....I was quite a let down when I learned these "advanced" power generating centers still make electric power the same way - by heating water to produce steam for mechanically turning a turbine- only the fuel is different.

Seems counter-intuitive, I know. Sort of like finding out we didnt really back-engineer Roswell UFO's - instead just put a harness around the saucers to pull our buggys in place of the horses... :-)
edit on 20-6-2013 by NewtonDKC because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 09:37 AM
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Originally posted by EViLKoNCEPTz
I'm a bit confused here. Now I'm no mathmagician but how does a square object melt a perfectly round hole in the ice? Square pegs do not go in round holes, that much I do know. That one part leaves me scratching my head because it doesn't quite add up.


What if the square was rotating around in a circle? That would create a perfect circle if the box was square and not rectangle....Just sayin



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 10:43 AM
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reply to post by EViLKoNCEPTz
 


While I can't offer up how they determined it was "perfectly round" I can say that when anything emits heat, it does so in a radius, regardless of the shape of the object, it radiates in a circular fashion around it. Being that it was a cube, and registered 2 to 3 roentgens per hour "around the lake" on a Geiger counter, it would be producing a high enough amount of BTU's to create the round hole, and though it says perfectly round, it also claims the sides were surrounded by slush.

Bearing in mind that if the area around the lake was measuring that high, the object in question would probably have registered about 1.5 to 2 times higher, and thus, hotter. The black object put in the van was probably a lead case to prevent further radiation exposure to the men. Personally, I am curious how long the object was, being that all he saw was that it was one foot square, but couldn't see its depth, for all we know it could have been a few feet long, and nobody describes the dimensions of the black object being placed in the van.

Sadly, this raises more questions than it answers, and since it happened so long ago, even first hand sources would be unreliable. Interesting story though OP.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by jiggerj
 


Maybe it was the Ark of the covenant



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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Originally posted by WilliamOckham

Originally posted by PhoenixOD


The object was believed to be radioactive because it melted the pond in the dead of winter.


Do radioactive materials heat water or melt ice? Ive not heard that before.

edit on 19-6-2013 by PhoenixOD because: (no reason given)


Also, jet engines, hot metal, friction or fire also melt ice. Just sayin'. Oh...and heat. Heat also melts ice.
edit on 19-6-2013 by WilliamOckham because: (no reason given)


Heat is a form of IR radiation. As for whether or not radioactive materials give off heat, what do you think causes nuclear reactors to generate heat (yes, low level fission is going on, but that is just part of the radioactive decay process). And all those stored, spent fuel rods at Fukushima, why were they heating up, do you think?

There have been cases where radioactive metal from thrown-away medical equipment has been found by scavengers and the people who found it had noted the metal's unusual warmth, and, in part, kept it for that reason -- bad move.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 08:26 PM
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Whatever it was, those people definitely suffered from radiation exposure. Do you know of any recent info concerning this case?
reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Betty Cash died at age 69. in December of 99. Here is an updated link on the case.

Update



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 08:31 PM
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Found some more stuff on this...


McCarthy's Pond

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