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Organic vs Non-organic prices. How do they compare in your area?

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posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 02:19 PM
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I just went to the grocery store and picked up a pack of strawberries. I usually go for organic when I can. However, I was keeping cost in mind when I checked the non-organic product by the same brand/farm. To my surprise, they were exactly the same price!

It was always my understanding and belief that the organic alternative was significantly more expensive than the non-organic produce.

There was actually an instance in the past where I found organic avocados that were cheaper than the non-organic kind. I asked the produce clerk, but he didn't know why. He told me, "That's just the way it is sometimes."

The more I look, I'm noticing that there isn't a significant difference in prices when comparing organic to non-organic.

What do produce prices look like in your area? Any idea why the prices might be the same, or even reversed as in the example of the avocados?


edit on 19-6-2013 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 02:30 PM
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just about every market i've gone into has higher prices on anything organic...whole foods is notorious for
jacking-up the prices on everything they sell.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 02:39 PM
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Organic = Rubes will pay more


Since there is no federal oversight or guidelines of what is, and what is not "organic", anyone can label their food as organic, and jack the price. Until there is some kind of regulation, you're just trusting the word of the source, without any proof whatsoever.....

Plenty of farmer stands where I am (and some of the biggest produce markets and producers in the state). I get right from the source for most things, so pretty much know what I'm getting.

edit on 19-6-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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I've been watching lately, when at the grocery store, and it seems the organic goes on sale more often. Maybe because it doesn't last as long on the shelf? Otherwise, it really isn't much more than the other, less a a buck usually.

Although now it is farmers market season, so I will be heading there more often.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 03:07 PM
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Originally posted by moonweed
just about every market i've gone into has higher prices on anything organic...whole foods is notorious for
jacking-up the prices on everything they sell.


Organic-grown plants do actually cost a bit more to grow. Organic nutrients are more expensive per percentage of npk than are plants grown with chemical nutrients. (and without pesticides, insects can increase cost of production by reducing supply). Organic plants are healthier for us to eat - mostly due to the lack of pesticides.

The large problem with chemical nutrients is two fold: first is the environmental impact of runoff and leeching, and second is that they are derived from oil & natural gas. Mass food production is based upon the availability of cheap petroleum products, and we know that it won't last forever.
edit on 19-6-2013 by pirhanna because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 03:14 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
Organic = Rubes will pay more


Since there is no federal oversight or guidelines of what is, and what is not "organic", anyone can label their food as organic, and jack the price. Until there is some kind of regulation, you're just trusting the word of the source, without any proof whatsoever.....

Plenty of farmer stands where I am (and some of the biggest produce markets and producers in the state). I get right from the source for most things, so pretty much know what I'm getting.

edit on 19-6-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



it's kinda funny the FDA doesn't care is something is labeled organic or not....but when it comes to GM food...no way...they refuse to let that happen.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 04:04 PM
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That's because they get huge kickbacks from Monsanto


I do actually buy 25lb bags of "organic" carrots at Publix though. (only kind that come in the 25lb size)
Costs me $16, which, per pound, is pretty cheap, considering a 1lb or 2lb bag is always $1 a pound (even at produce stands or markets). So, basically, I get 9 pounds for free.

(we have horses, so go through a lot of carrots) One of these bags will last pretty much the whole month, for 3 horses (we give as treats, and cut up some to go in their feed). We also have bunnies, so they get a treat too.

The look on those cashier's faces when I roll up with that 25lb bag is priceless...they always have to know just what the heck I'm going to do with so many carrots.




edit on 19-6-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 10:14 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 





Since there is no federal oversight or guidelines of what is, and what is not "organic", anyone can label their food as organic, and jack the price. Until there is some kind of regulation, you're just trusting the word of the source, without any proof whatsoever.....


Unbelievable. I'm not even going to comment any longer. Just post links.

USDA's National Organic Program regulates the standards for any farm, wild crop harvesting, or handling operation that wants to sell an agricultural product as organically produced.

The Organic Foods Production Act (OFPA), enacted under Title 21 of the 1990 Farm Bill, served to establish uniform national standards for the production and handling of foods labeled as “organic.”



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 12:17 AM
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My local Natural foods store always has signs up pointing out other local store non organic prices are higher than their organic.
Another store I buy at it is all local fruits and veggies so they keep the prices down that way.
I would still rather pay more now, than higher medical bills later.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by Carreau
 


Have you actually read all of that though? There are countless exclusions (almost EVERY small farm), and a million ways around it. I will grant that if you're buying something labelled as "organic" at a major supermarket chain, the chances are decent that it is actually certified (just so they cover their rear), but no guarantee.

I did misspeak when I said NO regulation though, so thank you for that correction. Just that I live in a heavy agricultural area, so most of our produce (big store or not) is from smaller local farms and is excluded from most of those regulations.



posted on Jun, 28 2013 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by NarcolepticBuddha
 

Originally posted by NarcolepticBuddha
I just went to the grocery store and picked up a pack of strawberries. I usually go for organic when I can. However, I was keeping cost in mind when I checked the non-organic product by the same brand/farm. To my surprise, they were exactly the same price!
It was always my understanding and belief that the organic alternative was significantly more expensive than the non-organic produce.
There was actually an instance in the past where I found organic avocados that were cheaper than the non-organic kind. I asked the produce clerk, but he didn't know why. He told me, "That's just the way it is sometimes."
The more I look, I'm noticing that there isn't a significant difference in prices when comparing organic to non-organic.
What do produce prices look like in your area? Any idea why the prices might be the same, or even reversed as in the example of the avocados?

Farming without synthetic pesticides is better for the soil, for the water and for the air — which is to say, for the commons. It is also better for the people who grow and harvest our food, who would much rather not breathe pesticides. Producing meat without antibiotics will also help stave off antibiotic-resistance. If you care about these things, then the premium paid for organic food is money well spent.
So, even if it was slightly more expensive... factoring free-trade commissions for farmers to grow their produce with healthier methodology, I would pay more for that... but really it's all in how you think about what you're buying...a 1.00 for a bacon cheeseburger at Mickey D's which is eaten in one sitting or a whole chicken for 4.00 that will last 2 weeks? Two weeks of cheese burgers would be 14.00...
Get my jist?



posted on Jul, 4 2013 @ 12:22 PM
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Why are you even eating organic in the first place?

Don't you already know that everything is determined by genetics?



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