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America's oldest cave paintings found, dating back 6K years

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posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:07 PM
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America's oldest cave paintings found, dating back 6K years
(dailymail.co.uk)


The faded images were found in Tennessee's Cumberland Plateau and are believed part of the most widespread collection of such art ever found in the U.S.


The finds were made at the 'Mud Glyph Cave' (and adjoining caves) in the Tennessee River Valley.

Article is loaded with images, so enjoy!




posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:13 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Right on ,

They might be the oldest where they are at but I think the title goes to rock art in Brazil.
I'll look up the site, but it has occupations going back 30k years.

It's still awwome s and f.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:16 PM
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Jackals????


Coyotes, and actual dogs, the native American dogs are some of the oldest domesticated animals there are.
A site here in my neck of the woods yielded dog remains 15,000 years old.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by punkinworks10
reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


Right on ,

They might be the oldest where they are at but I think the title goes to rock art in Brazil.
I'll look up the site, but it has occupations going back 30k years.

It's still awwome s and f.


Excellent observation my friend. Considering America is a continent. Zero ego.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:24 PM
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Woah some of them are very nice!

I especially like this scary looking dude!



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:29 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


That is a very impressive article and find. I believe there are many yet undiscovered finds like these in Tennessee. There are many hidden caves in the rural hills there. Hats off to you OP.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:35 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


It almost looks like they had cans of spray paint
S&F for the info.

Notice how the dogs in the picture have their tails pointed forward. Friends. If a dog or wolf is aggressive, it usually has it's tail back and low.
edit on 18-6-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


It almost looks like they had cans of spray paint
S&F for the info.

Notice how the dogs in the picture have their tails pointed forward. Friends. If a dog or wolf is aggressive, it usually has it's tail back and low.
edit on 18-6-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)

Good observations. It proves they are dogs and not wolves or Coyotes,
the native American dogs have high curled tails as compared to a wolf which has a straight tail or a coyote who carries it's tail low.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 02:59 PM
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reply to post by punkinworks10
 


The funny thing about that is that the Native Americans were not supposed to have dogs.....They were supposed to have come over with the settlers. I think that their notions about that may be wrong. There may have been dogs here already.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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Dogs have been present in the Americas since the last ice age, and were brought over with migrating humans via the Bering land bridge. They're about the only domesticated animal Native Americans had, other than some turkeys. The Mississippian Culture produced a lot of dog-related pottery.


Mississippian era (1350-1650 CE) pottery dog


Mississippian Mound culture bowl, "dragon dog"


Mississippian dog effigy

One observation that's interesting is that pottery dogs and effigy's were first produced in Mexico and just about the time that tradition died out it began further north among Native Americans.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 04:26 PM
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This is off topic, so I apologise.....I am genuinely curious, and although I could probably Google the answer, this might be the best place to ask first.

I live in Cumbria, England. Up until around 30 or 40 years ago it was known, as the part of the old counties, as Cumberland, and had been for centuries.

Do any of you know if there is a tie between the name of this place the cave painting was found and my home?

edit on 18/6/13 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 05:10 PM
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reply to post by woogleuk
 


To the best of my knowledge, the Cumberland mountains (along with the Cumberland river and plateau) are named after Prince William, Duke of Cumberland.


The mountains,, river and gap were all discovered by a party of Virginians in 1748, and named in honour of the victor of Culloden, William,, duke of Cumberland.


(source)

Locally there are a lot of place names that reflect places in Britain and Scotland, since they were the main component of immigrants trekking west to escape taxation on spirits in the fledgeling US government post independence.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 08:22 PM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 


ok, thanks for that...in that case, there is a tie as the role of Duke of Cumberland has to do with my local area.

I have a lot of pride in my home county hence why I was so interested in knowing about this.

I always say...Cumbrian first, English second, lol.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 10:36 PM
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Call that art? My four-year-old daughter could do better than that bunch of scrawls!


(If I had a four-year-old daughter, that is).

But seriously, I know it's technically 'art' in the sense that it is representative human expression, but it isn't exactly Lascaux, is it? Exciting from an archaeological point of view but hardly from an aesthetic one.

Apart from lots of very beautiful cave paintings (not just at Lascaux), there are also many beautifully-finished pieces of sculpture, jewellery and utilitarian ware preserved from Neolithic times. Much of it is older than these 'paintings'.

Joking apart, if the truth were ever known, these putative artworks might really be found to have been done by children.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 11:03 PM
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This one is especially interesting to me.


It looks like a crude representation of a language, or an attempt at language. great thread thanks for sharing .



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 11:52 PM
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reply to post by Astyanax
 


You're right it doesn't really compare to the cave art from Lascaux aesthetically, and of course isn't nearly as old, but then caves in France weren't that far from the cradle of humanity in Africa, where as the American continent is among the last places humans arrived at, a mere 13-15,000 years ago, so in some respects this cave art reflects the spread of humankind and the differences in development of pockets of humanity. This cave art, according to the report, is about 6,000 years old, yet it shows some stylistic similarities to Mississippian art from 1200 AD, still the same subject matter (dogs, etc.) over a 5,000 year span. Interesting yes, alas not Lascaux interesting...



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 12:25 AM
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Originally posted by Blackmarketeer
reply to post by Astyanax
 


You're right it doesn't really compare to the cave art from Lascaux aesthetically, and of course isn't nearly as old, but then caves in France weren't that far from the cradle of humanity in Africa, where as the American continent is among the last places humans arrived at, a mere 13-15,000 years ago, so in some respects this cave art reflects the spread of humankind and the differences in development of pockets of humanity. This cave art, according to the report, is about 6,000 years old, yet it shows some stylistic similarities to Mississippian art from 1200 AD, still the same subject matter (dogs, etc.) over a 5,000 year span. Interesting yes, alas not Lascaux interesting...

Wow, really, humans have been in the new world for at least 50,000 years and likely for up to 200,000 years. While people were painting animals in France , native Americans were scuplting dogs from camel bones.



This carving is 40k years old



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 12:28 AM
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As far as dogs go

Pending further research and considering that dog DNA contains a lot of noise due to frequent hybridization, a hypothesis should be entertained that pre-Columbian dogs are direct descendants of the earliest domestication event that took place in the New World and the Altai dog is the early Old World offshoot from a New World source of canine domestication.


anthropogenesis.kinshipstudies.org... e-oldest-dog-news-from-around-the-web/



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 05:11 AM
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reply to post by Blackmarketeer
 




They're about the only domesticated animal Native Americans had, other than some turkeys.

In addition to dogs and turkeys, there were llamas, alpacas and guinea pigs. There are Spanish explorers records of deer being domesticated by pre-Columbian Americans also. They, according to the Spanish accounts, milked does and even made cheese from the milk.

While not as widespread as in other areas of the world (Asia, Africa, Europe), native Americans did have livestock. In Mexico as well as Central America, natives had domesticated deer which was used for meat and possibly even milk. Domesticated turkeys were common in Mesoamerica and in some regions of North America; they were valued for their meat, feathers, and, possibly (though less likely), eggs. There is documentation of Mesoamericans utilizing hairless dogs, especially the Xoloitzcuintle breed, for their meat. Andean societies had llamas and alpacas for the same reasons, as well as for beasts of burden. Guinea pigs were raised for meat in the Andes. Iguanas were another source of meat in Mexico, Central, and northern South America.

Wikipedia: Pre-Columbian Era


When the early Spanish explorers first visited what is now the southeastern United States, they encountered native Americans who raised semidomesticated deer. Men from De Soto's expedition reported that in Ocale, an Indian town in northern Florida, "there is to be found . . . fowls, a multitude of turkeys, kept in pens, and herds of tame deer that are tended."2 According to the 16th-century Spanish historian Gómara, in Apalachicola (what is now the state of Florida), "there are very many deer that they raise in the house and they go with shepherds into the pasture, and they return to the corral at night."3 Another early historian of Spain, Peter Martyr d'Anghiera, recorded: In all these regions they visited, the Spaniards noticed herds of deer similar to our herds of cattle. These deer bring forth and nourish their young in the houses of the natives. During the daytime they wander freely through the woods in search of their food, and in the evening they come back to their little ones, who have been cared for, allowing themselves to be shut up in the courtyards and even to be milked, when they have suckled their fawns. The only milk the natives know is that of the does, from which they make cheese.



Maxwell Institute



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:26 AM
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Did anyone notice the date scrawled on the wall? 1847; there seems to be other intelligible scrawls above and below it. God-damned varmints


Also, the initials, 'C.S.', in this pic:

edit on 2013/6/19 by Jimjolnir because: (no reason given)




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