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New Subatomic Particle Zc(3900) Hints at Four-Quark Matter

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posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 01:13 PM
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More exciting finds from the world of Physics. This time Particle Physics has evidence that there is possibly a newly discovered subatomic particle, two independent sources have verified this in their own tests.

As a child I kept a ball of squishy dried glue (called glueball) in my jewelry box along with a found diamond shaped crystal, and the usual rings etc. (they are probably still there). I love the fact that the new hypothetical all gluon particle has the moniker ''glueball''. Yay!, double yay at the possibility that it is likened to an atom of pure light.

scitechdaily.com...

New Subatomic Particle Zc(3900) Hints at Four-Quark Matter


Eric Swanson from the University of Pittsburgh gives his viewpoint on two new experiments have detected the signature of a new subatomic particle, Zc(3900).

Particle physicists seem to have a pretty good handle on the fundamental particles of the universe, but there are some glaring holes in this understanding. Quarks are a good example of this. We know that all nuclear matter is made up of quarks, and we have a pretty good understanding of how two quarks interact at close range. But our quark theory cannot tell us which quark combinations will result in a bound particle or a stable nuclei. All we can go on is experience, and experience has shown that particles with four quarks do not exist. But the situation may have changed with the possible discovery of a new particle containing at least four quarks. Two separate groups, both reporting in Physical Review Letters, have seen evidence for this strange particle, called Zc(3900). Although the data is open to other interpretations, it’s clear that our understanding of quarks has a long way to go.

The evidence for Zc(3900) comes from two independent groups: the BESIII Collaboration at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider, China, [1] and the Belle Collaboration at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Tsukuba, Japan [2]. It is the business of both labs to accelerate electrons and positrons to nearly the speed of light, smashing them into each other and carefully analyzing the resulting debris. Taken together, the two collaborations have uncovered 466 events that appear to have a Zc(3900) in their debris.

In the ethereal world of high-energy physics, it is easy to forget that subatomic particles are quite real: they smack into things, betray their presence in photographic emulsion, leave tiny contrails in bubble chambers, set off showers of electrons in gases, and emit cones of light in liquids. Experimentalists have created detectors that leverage all of these subatomic signatures in a single, house-sized assembly. The Belle and BESIII collaborations are each named after the detectors that the scientists have labored so long to build.

Previous particle physics detectors have given us a fairly detailed picture of the interior of atoms. We know that an atom consists of electrons in orbitals and a core nucleus. Nuclei are built of protons and neutrons, and protons and neutrons are built of quarks. Quarks come in six varieties that can stick together to make an infinite array of particles called hadrons (protons and neutrons are two of these). The theory that describes the interactions of quarks is called quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and is part of our current theory of everything, called the standard model. At high energies, QCD is relatively simple to understand and its predictions have been confirmed many times over. However, it is vexingly difficult to make predictions with QCD at lower energies, where quarks bind together into particles. Thus we cannot unambiguously say which quark configurations are allowed and which are not. This irony (of having the pieces but not the manual to put them together) makes it especially important to explore the panoply of hadrons in experiments such as BESIII and Belle.


edit on 18-6-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)
edit on 6-19-2013 by Springer because: added External Content tags and reduce amount of copy/pasted content




posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 01:18 PM
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So, let me get this straight.
When the quarks get together. They form a Voltron?



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 01:37 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


BAhahahah

Seriously cool stuff though.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
I love the fact that the new hypothetical all gluon particle has the moniker ''glueball''. Yay!, double yay at the possibility that it is likened to an atom of pure light.
It's an interesting find.

I'm not sure where you got the idea the hypothetical glueball is "new", but Morningstar and Peardon computed glueball masses in 1999 or 14 years ago so that idea isn't new at all.

The new particle Zc(3900) isn't a glueball.

Glueballs are very difficult to detect, so while they've been hypothesized for quite some time, that's the reason they haven't been confirmed yet in experimental observations.
edit on 18-6-2013 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 06:00 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


I am aware of both those things, Zc(3900) is new and I like ''glueball'' which I know has been around a while, especially if it's hypothesis can be proven. I think I already commented on it somewhere on ATS on my first screen name, some years ago, if I recall correctly. It is very interesting science, one step closer to understanding the machinations of the Universe
edit on 18-6-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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Thanks for the heads, up, this deserves a few more replies from the erudite and knowledgeable here.....
The prospect of another natural building block just adds that much more intensity to the very bizarre picture we have of the sub atomic universe.
One thing i must say, is that the damn thang must be veeery small..................

Wonder what this will do for chemistry etc?



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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oops my bad
edit on 18-6-2013 by stirling because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 08:39 PM
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Originally posted by stirling
Thanks for the heads, up, this deserves a few more replies from the erudite and knowledgeable here.....
The prospect of another natural building block just adds that much more intensity to the very bizarre picture we have of the sub atomic universe.
One thing i must say, is that the damn thang must be veeery small..................

Wonder what this will do for chemistry etc?


You're welcome.

Yep, a few insights from those in the know would be good, perhaps a few ideas and possibilities on the effects of such a find would be nice!


I guess this will affect a lot of science, there's so much advance in areas like nano particles that there is possibly an eager scientist somewhere just looking for such a development to prove something else.



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 11:58 PM
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Originally posted by stirling
Wonder what this will do for chemistry etc?
This will probably do nothing for what most consider chemistry, which looks at the nucleus as sort of a black box with a certain number of protons and neutrons, and doesn't care much about quarks.

But in particle physics it could be an advance in our understanding. I can't really think of any immediate practical applications, it may be knowledge just for the sake of knowing.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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I had a brief foray into quantum mechanics during engineering school, so I do try to follow the field and it is definitely fascinating. Theoretical physics is far from my specialty, however, so I was unable to catch the full significance of the discovery. It sounded like this may be a possible insight into the mysterious "gluons" that hold subatomic particles together?

I thought it was interesting they said there were infinite possible arrangements of subatomic particles. Unless I am mistaken, it sounds like they could be referring to unstable combinations that break apart after a few femtoseconds (or whatever unit of time is appropriate for quantum reactions).

What also caught my attention was the sharing of photons between electrons, which I had never heard before. It seems like this is a common theme in atomic systems - chemical bonds forming by sharing electrons, electrons sharing photons, and subatomic particles sharing gluons.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 01:12 AM
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I hope this isn't too off topic..... but do any of you detect the possibility that the subtle energy so often examined, utilized, realized, and implied in occultism, spirituality, esoterics, reiki, etc - could perhaps actually be tiny packets of information/light similar to quarks that we just haven't detected yet?

What if we are getting really close to understanding the nature of "energies" that has been the entire basis of many spiritual concepts?



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 02:06 AM
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reply to post by apcbm4
 


Yep, sounds like you read the article right, the arrangements of quarks and gluons including shared gluons is basically the jist, as well as the fact this 'matter' held for nano measurements, still a good leap in understanding matter and the 'glue' that keeps matter together.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 02:17 AM
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Originally posted by supermarket2012
I hope this isn't too off topic..... but do any of you detect the possibility that the subtle energy so often examined, utilized, realized, and implied in occultism, spirituality, esoterics, reiki, etc - could perhaps actually be tiny packets of information/light similar to quarks that we just haven't detected yet?

What if we are getting really close to understanding the nature of "energies" that has been the entire basis of many spiritual concepts?



It isn't off topic in my opinion, I have always felt that religion and science are trying to understand the same thing, essentially.

I wrote on a thread a while ago that inspiration is likened to a 'lightbulb', and that words sometimes describe things more accurately than just on the surface, ''seeing the light'', ''light at the end of the tunnel'' ''light of day'' etc, so pretty much something I think is true, that light is part of spirituality ''the light of god'', ''the life, the light'' etc or from a more holistic point of view, the essence of everything, creation etc, the fact that science is studying light and the very particles and how they are held together for life and finding such things validates the other, in ways that make more sense, than just man made religion as per churches. There are a lot of teachings from the bible and other religions that accurately describe scientific processes with the use of allegory or a story involving G*d and people. Almost as if the ancients knew of science but didn't realise it, or at least some were in such a state of tuning in to such energies to know and relay the truth of such, albeit in a fashion they knew of instead of the scientific wordings.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 08:04 AM
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Another article on the ''charmed particle'' here.

www.space.com...


The new particle has been dubbed Z_c(3900). The physicists can't be sure what Z_c(3900) is made of, but they are fairly sure it exists. The Belle experiment found 160 of the particles, and BESIII found 300. Both discoveries are statistically significant, and are extremely unlikely to turn out to be a fluke. The findings were described in two papers published June 17 in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Bound states like this have never been observed before, so many in the particle physics community have been left scratching their heads," physicist Eric Swanson of the University of Pittsburgh, who was not involved in either project, wrote in an essay about the discoveries published in the same journal issue.

"If the four-quark explanation is confirmed, our particle physics zoo will need to be enlarged to include new species," Swanson added. "And our understanding of quark taxonomy will have expanded into a new realm"


BESIII is the latest iteration of a project that began at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider in the 1990s. Only recently has the experiment been targeting the byproducts of Y(4260) particles, and its initial findings on the Z_c(3900) are based on just two months of data collection, Harris said. With more time, the physicists expect to gain a clearer picture of what the particle is made of and what other strange combinations of quarks might be possible.

We're quite excited," Harris said. "We started doing the X-Y-Z physics recently, and I think we're going to be very successful," he added, referring to the mysterious family of quark-containing particles with names beginning with the letters X, Y and Z.

The first version of Belle, located at the KEKB particle accelerator in Tsukuba, Japan, shut down in 2010, and the new discovery is based on data acquired before then. The project's successor, Belle 2, is currently under construction and expected to start up in 2015. The experiment was chiefly designed to study the differences between matter and antimatter.

When we first built Belle we never in our wildest dreams anticipated we'd find something like this," Piilonen said. "We were not looking for these particular states, but all these fascinating discoveries came about serendipitously.
edit on 20-6-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)





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