Seeking those with Hashimoto's

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posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 10:12 AM
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Why do most docs refuse to give T3.Mine refuses to even test for it!I have no other options for an endocrinologist,so I am stuck.So I see that indeed I am not alone on ATS and I figure there are many more that have yet to drop into the thread.




posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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Have any of you tried a gluten-free diet? I have autoimmune (SLE, Sjrogens) and going GF eradicated all the inflammation in my body within 2 weeks. I'm 5'8' and weighed 196, after 6 months I am 145 and look like a teenager again. People are starting to compare me to Nicole Kidman, yay! My energy is way up. Am swimming every other day now. Even though I am eating GF I do not reduce portion size at all. Also I do not include oats on my GF menu, I reacted to them. Switched from coffee to black tea also 'cause of reaction.

My doctors had been stumped on my weight gain before my GF conversion. They blamed it on hormones, age, etc... even though I was eating like a bird. Now, after seeing how much it helped me they are recommending it to other patients. Oh, also I haven't had any butterfly rashes at all, no aches and pains and the lupus brain fog is gone, yay again! Inflammation is the enemy evidently.

Best to all of you,

STM
edit on 6/19/2013 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 10:22 AM
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I was told unless you have celiac's,GF is a fad.I see many that tout it,others that don't respond great.I am torn as to the science behind it-is there med. journals that have studies,etc.?



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 10:27 AM
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reply to post by SilverStar33
 
I googled Hashimotos gluten and got a huge list of articles, have a go at it, here's one example:

Source: survivinghashimotos.blogspot.com...

Celiac Disease is not the only condition that requires gluten avoidance to maintain proper health. Some gluten researchers estimate that as many as 80% of Americans are genetically predisposed to gluten intolerance, while 43% are predisposed to Celiac disease. Those figures are not even considering the affects of genetically modified gluten, which accounts for much of the country's supply. Thyroid experts strongly urge people with thyroid problems to completely eradicate gluten from their diets. Gluten is a protein that is found in wheat, rye, barley, oats, triticale, and spelt. Countless studies have proven that gluten and Hashimoto's have a strong connection. Gluten actually has similar properties to the thyroid gland, making it a vile enemy to a Hashimoto's victim, especially if that individual is already predisposed to gluten intolerance or Celiac disease. Products containing gluten weaken the intestinal walls and can facilitate leaky gut, yet another common problem for Hashimoto's patients. When leaky gut occurs, gluten can make it's way from the intestines to the blood stream, where the immune system likely sends out it's immune system cells to attack it, exacerbating an autoimmune condition.


STM
edit on 6/19/2013 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by seentoomuch
 
This phone won't show the link.I will try to find a med. journal/study when I get to a relatives PC.Thank you though, others may find it helpful.I hear that this works for you.What do you eat in general with so few options?



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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reply to post by SilverStar33
 


Typical breakfast: 2 eggs, 2 slices bacon, GF waffle with about 2 tablespoons of blackberry jam

Lunch: Some beans that i cook in my cooker, small bowl of rice with lots of butter and salt (iodized sea salt, Hains is a good brand)

Afternoon snack: small bowl of plain greek yogurt (full fat) small handful of walnut halves and about a tablespoon of raw honey

Dinner: Usually something on the grill like a steak or chicken with Kraft Barbecue sauce, mushrooms, large baked potato with salt, butter, cheddar cheese, sour cream. If not a potato I will have rice, or quinoa. Yum, sometimes I make tabulleh with the quinoa with herbs from my garden. I also use veggies from my garden.

Late night snack: A couple of Reese's peanut butter cups, or a snickers, or some plain M & Ms, or some GF cake that my sister makes for me.

Out and About: Ask for a GF menu, lots of options, The number one dessert at restaurants is Creme Brûlée with berries on top. Also some of the restaurants carry Ida's GF white bread so I can have hamburgers with a bun. If they don't I order a burger without the bun with all the regular toppings. The list goes on and on, it gets easier as you learn where the gluten is hidden. For example: Soy sauce and teriaki sauce, I buy the gluten free versions.

STM
edit on 6/19/2013 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 11:11 AM
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Thank you for sharing.Sounds healthy and tasty.Maybe there are others out there willing to contribute to the topic that started this.Why are there so many with these types of autoimmune illness?Why now and not 10 years ago.Medicine is advancing yet the bloodwork to find these illnesses did not just come into being.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 11:20 AM
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As to why so many cases showing up now I would imagine that there are several factors. For example in the 70s scientists quadrupled the amount of gluten in the wheat we grow, it is now standard. At that point I'm sure many people started having various problems that were misdiagnosed. Now we have better testing capabilities and we are zeroing in on Hashimoto and other auto immune illnesses. Also, the chemicals used on our food supply, also our water supply, also our use of herbicides on our lawns, etc, etc.... Modern living is the cause overall imho. The effect of all the tampering is inflammation that attacks various parts of the body. Just my 2 cents.

STM



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 01:01 PM
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I also have hashimotos since i was a teenagers. i am now 42. yes it is a struggle to manage the weight but it can be done. i still feel tired alot of times, have hair loss and get insomnia and constant muscle pains. I take sythroid . I have tried armour but i got really sick on it for some reason. I find I have to be on a strict diet. lots of fresh organic fruit and vegetables.. no processed foods at all. No carbs. I live on salads .. I know it is not fun but I keep my weight down. You also have to excersive and move all day.. whether you are tired or sore. I walk in the park 3 times a day. I also supplement alot . Selenium is really good for thyroid and i take a whole bunch of vitamins and minerals. It helps,, not a cure but manageable. try eating good, take selenium and magnesiums and a bunch of vitamins



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 01:24 PM
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I wonder if mild exposure to radioactive iodine would cause the thyroid to malfunction,
and would it ever disappear?



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 01:51 PM
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reply to post by SilverStar33
 

I receive my prescription for T3 pills from my endocrinologist. Anytime I have to visit a new doctor and give a list of 'scripts everyone always asks about it. No one has ever heard of it.

If you are looking for an alternative, search and see if your area has compounding pharmacies. Sometimes they are attached to clinics that will do testing and then use the results for the formula.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:10 PM
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Originally posted by SilverStar33
Why do most docs refuse to give T3.Mine refuses to even test for it!I have no other options for an endocrinologist,so I am stuck.So I see that indeed I am not alone on ATS and I figure there are many more that have yet to drop into the thread.


T3 will supposedly be supplied by your liver by conversion of T4. The synthroid salesmen convince endos that this is always sufficient. Mine didn't though. My T3 was too low even with enough T4.

I did my own T3 test because my GP wouldn't. It's pretty straightforward in most states. A few won't let you stroke your own lab orders but only three or four.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by CAPT PROTON
I wonder if mild exposure to radioactive iodine would cause the thyroid to malfunction,
and would it ever disappear?


Consumption of unfermented soy products will do it.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 06:15 PM
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reply to post by SilverStar33
 


There's a website that will send it to you, totally dependable. Which brings up a T&C question. Can I post links to no script Armour thyroid and no script blood testing? Mods?



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by OneisOne
 


I have the hair loss, but unsure if I can attribute it to the Hashimoto's or if I have an undiagnosed Rheumatoid Arthritis or maybe SLE. I was tested positive for Thyroid Antibodies years ago, and I had either my T3 or T4 out of sorts back in 2002 and 2003, but now they say it is normal, but I have documents that show it is still enlarged. However, I also have had 4 positive ANA tests and elevated CRP - 2.5 on scale of 0 - 1.0 and C3 and C4 complements are elevated. I was asked by an Orthopedic doctor if I have ever been told I have Rheumatoid Arthritis and he says he can't rule it out, but won't definitely say I have it either. And I have a family history of Glomerulonephritis with kidney failure or just kidney failure, but unsure of the cause. Father, Paternal Grandma, and Paternal Uncle. And I have arthritis, protein in urine on occasion, and pitting edema in my legs most of the time.

So I am unsure what the cause is of my hair loss, but I lose lots every day. I am surprised I'm not bald by now, and I am a woman. I have had hair turn gray, then turn back to my natural color, which I found odd. Why would hair suddenly turn back to color after turning gray?

It is possible that if you have one autoimmune problem, that you can have others at the same time. UGH! Sigh.



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 11:39 PM
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reply to post by HODOSKE
 


What is it that selenium does for you? I have issues with heavy metal toxicity, and while it is not a metal, it can be toxic to humans. So I am curious about the benefits??



posted on Jun, 19 2013 @ 11:47 PM
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reply to post by MountainEnigma
 

Originally posted by MountainEnigma
reply to post by OneisOne
 

It is possible that if you have one autoimmune problem, that you can have others at the same time. UGH! Sigh.
Hi,

A rheumatologist told me that people with auto immune conditions wander in and out of one condition to the other and on to the next. Please consider the gluten free or similar diet if you haven't already, it cuts across the board by bringing down or totally eradicating inflammation which seems to be the cause of many of the conditions we are speaking of.
edit on 6/19/2013 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 12:43 AM
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reply to post by seentoomuch
 


Yes, I looked at your links for GF information just a few minutes ago and watched that man's explanation about eating a bagel. It will be difficult because I love a piece of toast smothered in butter. But if it means I will lose weight, quit hurting, and feel better all over, as well as the brain fog will be gone, I am all for trying it.

From reading your posts, it sounds like you are still able to eat sugar in various forms, which is good for me because I like drinking tea.

And we don't have a good access to organic/grass fed beef that I am aware of, so I will have to do some research.

Great info though! I will start tomorrow. One note. Now that I think about it, I always seemed to feel better when I ate steak, baked potato and veggies with some sour cream and a side of cottage cheese and a salad.

Also, and this may help you, Tart cherry pills or Dried cherries are great for fighting inflammation. My dad has CKD and he uses cherry pills to help with inflammation of his arthritis because he can't take the NSAIDS.

Thanks!



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 07:46 AM
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reply to post by MountainEnigma
 


Try serrapeptase, it's an antiinflammatory that doesn't work like a typical nsaid.



posted on Jun, 20 2013 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by MountainEnigma
 
Thanks for the dried cherry tip, yum!

Here's a good site for showing you what you CAN eat. I know you're starting with a paleo version but don't forget to learn where gluten is hidden. And lol, you can have gluten free bagels on the standard GF diet, they're at Whole Foods. Pizza too! Dominos has a pretty decent GF pizza made with rice flour. I order double cheese on mine. You can drink wine, vodka, and a couple of other spirits, just be sure and google to make sure its on the list, for example whiskey is not allowed. Beer has gluten, but now they make a few kinds that are GF, usually Whole Foods or Central Market carries them. When I first started I googled everything to make sure, is such and such gluten free? Now I don't need to, I got it down baby.

Anyhow, back to the point I was making until I got carried away with all the goodies, is that the salad dressing choice for your salad is the number one mistake people make on this diet. Be sure and google the brand before you buy it. I like Maries dressings and they are all gluten free, yay!

Here's the link to a great starter list for you:

celiacdisease.about.com...

P.S. I bet your father jumps on board when he sees how much better you feel.


P.S.S. Paleo is a good way to start but if you do start to teeter on it go with the standard gluten free diet for breaks. My son is on the paleo and shows up at my house now and then to raid my cupboard
edit on 6/20/2013 by seentoomuch because: (no reason given)





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