Facebook reveals user data requests

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posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 02:18 AM
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Facebook reveals user data requests


t.news.uk.msn.com

Facebook received up to 10,000 requests from the US government for user data in the second half of last year, the company has revealed.

It said that after a week of negotiations with US security officials, the company is allowed to make new revelations about government orders for user data.
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.nbcnews.com
www.bloomberg.com
news.yahoo.com




posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 02:18 AM
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Thought this was interesting. Whilst I think as long as the data requests are to help missing children or stop terrorism. | can't help but wonder what else they are after
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SAN FRANCISCO (Reuters) - Facebook Inc received between 9,000 and 10,000 requests for user data from various U.S. government entities in 2012's second half, involving 18,000 to 19,000 of its users' accounts, the world's largest social network said in a Friday blogpost

Whilst 18,000 to 19,000 of its users' accounts is not too much considering there are 250 million users. It's a bit worrying that something supposedly to keep in touch with friends is of such interest to our gov'ts. Next time I pop out to buy a cucumber I'll be sure to phone the whitehouse and let them know, save them the hassle of checking


t.news.uk.msn.com
(visit the link for the full news article)
edit on 15/6/13 by cody599 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 02:25 AM
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reply to post by cody599
 
I have always believed that Facebook gives access to ALL of it's user data to the govt. I think this "revelation" is really just a PR white washing job. In fact, I'm not sure it isn't the govt. running the whole Facebook show!



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 02:33 AM
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Facebook does 50% of the government's job when it comes to snooping


I just feel sorry for the rookie NSA agent who spends all his time trying to piece together my life. They're in for a big disappointment!

"I have nothing to hide" doesn't make it right. I'm not sure what's more disturbing--the fact that personal info is available to the highest bidders, or that the users are compliant and complacent with having their info sold to the highest bidder.

It's only a matter of time before we're judging and prosecuting people based on their facebook posts...oh wait.

edit on 15-6-2013 by NarcolepticBuddha because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 02:37 AM
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So what ?

did facebook reveal what it has done for NSA?

It is the fact of revealing a little none bitter truth to cover the bitter part.

I do believe that all social networks have their way of getting information out of the users



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 03:19 AM
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Originally posted by cody599
Next time I pop out to buy a cucumber I'll be sure to phone the whitehouse and let them know, save them the hassle of checking



*Notes down in little black official book*... Cody from ATS is a cucumber addict


Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 04:02 AM
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Well, gee... So this might technically be true.

PRISM scandal: tech giants flatly deny allowing NSA direct access to servers

They may not have given them direct access. Fine... Going by the numbers reported in the OP story though, 10,000 requests in 6 months is around 55 requests per day, 7 days a week for the entire 180 or so days of the period.


Instead of giving them direct access, it sounds like they basically assigned staff to be their clerks on demand. They'd have to be with the requests averaging that way, every day, if the Gov't wasn't using direct access to their servers. Either one?


Bad thing so see for how far it went...and I'm sure we're still seeing only a part of a much larger whole. Scary, huh?



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 04:08 AM
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We should be shocked, alarmed and outraged!

But let's face it...we're not.

Actually to be further on point, the figure quoted for requests is a shocker....shockingly low.

There is always the possibility the figure is much higher, especailly when you consider how data is manipulated.

After all, how many people is it now in the UK, who have been sent to jail or convicted because of content they have posted on Facebook?!

Not that I would agree with their views essentially, but freedom of speech really isn't freedom at all, when it comes with such a heavy handed proviso.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 04:18 AM
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reply to post by solargeddon
 


Well to be technical about it, since we're losing more than one here just recently by the look of things... I'm sad to realize it's the 4th we've lost by all this.


The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.
(Source: USConstitution.net)

Yup... May as well cut that one out of the document. It doesn't seem to apply with the secret orders for secret investigations all based out of secret courts. Whose to know just what anything looks like for reasonable?
edit on 15-6-2013 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 04:20 AM
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Many proponents of these Orwellian tactics have stated over and over that "they are not listening to everything, they are not reading everything".

What they are doing is trend-tracking.

They are not listening to Cody's calls or reading all of his messages.

But they are compiling data that Cody;
Called the Cucumber Hotline (even though they didn't listen to the conversation)
Friended the Cucumber Society (even though they didn't read his posts on the cucumber chat board)
Bought a cucumber at Tescos (remember that little bar code?)

So now, when they decide that cucumbers are a danger to society and that cucumber sandwiches are subversive, they will already have Cody's data on a list.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 04:32 AM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


Well I for one, am never buying another cucumber, oh and I'm cancelling my subscription to "Cucumber Weekly"!




posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 04:36 AM
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Originally posted by solargeddon
reply to post by beezzer
 


Well I for one, am never buying another cucumber, oh and I'm cancelling my subscription to "Cucumber Weekly"!



Too late.

"When they outlaw cucumbers, only outlaws will have nice sandwiches".



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 05:17 AM
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I'm dealing with the nature of said technology in the following thread:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Please keep the politics at the door in the interest of scholarly pursuits.

The capabilities exist for Facial recognition, trend analysis, and general translations of all sorts apparently. It is quite difficult however, to understand the technologies without a background in math. But by reading about basic principals, one can still learn.

Consider this: by altering pitch and intonation, "sloppy speech" can be used to confound basic voice recognition. Alternatively, more advanced software is able to specifically filter such sloppy speech and translate it.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 05:40 AM
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But they are compiling data that Cody; Called the Cucumber Hotline (even though they didn't listen to the conversation) Friended the Cucumber Society (even though they didn't read his posts on the cucumber chat board) Bought a cucumber at Tescos (remember that little bar code?) So now, when they decide that cucumbers are a danger to society and that cucumber sandwiches are subversive, they will already have Cody's data on a list.
reply to post by beezzer
 


Oh my God


I bought it for the wife, if they find that out I'm going to the top of the hit list.


Jeez what happens tomorrow when I need carrots for the roast


beez I could be personally responsible for carrot riots, and shortages world wide, sorry my friend you may just have to stick to foodstuffs I don't eat. Do rabbits like fish ?

Cody



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 05:51 AM
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Originally posted by NarcolepticBuddha
Facebook does 50% of the government's job when it comes to snooping





The government looks like newcomers to the game. The "civilian" world has been at it for years.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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Originally posted by cody599



But they are compiling data that Cody; Called the Cucumber Hotline (even though they didn't listen to the conversation) Friended the Cucumber Society (even though they didn't read his posts on the cucumber chat board) Bought a cucumber at Tescos (remember that little bar code?) So now, when they decide that cucumbers are a danger to society and that cucumber sandwiches are subversive, they will already have Cody's data on a list.
reply to post by beezzer
 


Oh my God


I bought it for the wife, if they find that out I'm going to the top of the hit list.


Jeez what happens tomorrow when I need carrots for the roast


beez I could be personally responsible for carrot riots, and shortages world wide, sorry my friend you may just have to stick to foodstuffs I don't eat. Do rabbits like fish ?

Cody


We only like fish swimming in vinegar.


As for the rest, you will be held accountable for vegetable-related terrorist activities from now on. Sorry, but the cabbage ratted you out!



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 06:05 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


How about these grocery store chains, and more, that force a customer to surrender purchase data via a shopping card or face higher check out charges. When they say you "save" by getting a savings card.....it just a rank form of coercion. Its has been the "civilian" world for some time now that has been conditioning the world for these sort of "official" intrusions. Everything from checking the credit reports of potential hires to making employees sign personal conduct agreements for off the clock activities......anyway and certainly some in government have been encouraged by the methods used by the others to keep the sheep in line out here.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 06:06 AM
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reply to post by cody599
 


I would say "read between the lines".
This is "requests", what about "offered" assistance?

If FB has an agreement with the NSA already, this data would not need to be requested.

In addition, I have thought from the outset that this is not all by permission. These companies might think that they are supplying information on legal request, but I am almost certain that the NSA has hacked the systems of these companies and is gathering data without legal permission.

This has pretty much be stated in other articles where the secret department within the NSA is discussed. I think it's called "Special Requested Access" or something like that. The understanding is that this top-secret group deliberately targets the secure systems of governments, corporations and individuals to find a way in and gather data.

It has to be said too that if the NSA has been gathering data through the direct tapping of communications, Google and FaceBook staff would be just as open to spying efforts as anyone else. Any Google or FB employee who has ever accessed their secure systems over an internet connection from anywhere at all could have provided the NSA with a way into that system any time they like.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 06:51 AM
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This has pretty much be stated in other articles where the secret department within the NSA is discussed. I think it's called "Special Requested Access" or something like that. The understanding is that this top-secret group deliberately targets the secure systems of governments, corporations and individuals to find a way in and gather data.
reply to post by Rocker2013
 


Could you point in direction of said articles google didn't come up with anything relevant, or at least I missed it.

Thanks
Cody



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 07:07 AM
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reply to post by beezzer
 


Damn I knew that cabbage was too sexy to be interested in little me for just sex




And so began the great fruit and vegetable riots of 2013 a dark day in history for us all




And all because the wife wanted a cucumber


Oh the shame, the shame


Cody





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