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New Material State “Defies” Laws of Physics

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posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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A very interesting development in the world of physics and a step closer to truly understanding matter, it's properties and potential.

Additionally, this is a major development in the realisation that physics and science doesn't yet know everything, and there are infinite possibilities yet to be discovered, perhaps even those that could explain other as yet 'unexplained' phenomena.

scitechdaily.com...


In a newly published study, researchers from the Argonne National Laboratory detail how they seemingly defied the laws of physics, using hydrostatic pressure to make dense materials with interpenetrated atomic frameworks into novel porous materials.

Lemont, Illinois – When you squeeze something, it gets smaller. Unless you’re at Argonne National Laboratory.

At the suburban Chicago laboratory, a group of scientists has seemingly defied the laws of physics and found a way to apply pressure to make a material expand instead of compress/contract.

It’s like squeezing a stone and forming a giant sponge,” said Karena Chapman, a chemist at the U.S. Department of Energy laboratory. “Materials are supposed to become denser and more compact under pressure. We are seeing the exact opposite. The pressure-treated material has half the density of the original state. This is counterintuitive to the laws of physics.”




Because this behavior seems impossible, Chapman and her colleagues spent several years testing and retesting the material until they believed the unbelievable and understood how the impossible could be possible. For every experiment, they got the same mind-bending results. “The bonds in the material completely rearrange,” Chapman said. “This just blows my mind.” This discovery will do more than rewrite the science text books; it could double the variety of porous framework materials available for manufacturing, health care and environmental sustainability.





Scientists use these framework materials, which have sponge-like holes in their structure, to trap, store and filter materials. The shape of the sponge-like holes makes them selectable for specific molecules, allowing their use as water filters, chemical sensors and compressible storage for carbon dioxide sequestration of hydrogen fuel cells. By tailoring release rates, scientists can adapt these frameworks to deliver drugs and initiate chemical reactions for the production of everything from plastics to foods.

“This could not only open up new materials to being porous, but it could also give us access to new structures for selectability and new release rates,” said Peter Chupas, an Argonne chemist who helped discover the new materials.

The team published the details of their work in the May 22 issue of the Journal of the American Chemical Society in an article titled “Exploiting High Pressures to Generate Porosity, Polymorphism, And Lattice Expansion in the Nonporous Molecular Framework Zn(CN)2.”

The scientists put zinc cyanide, a material used in electroplating, in a diamond-anvil cell at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne and applied high pressures of 0.9 to 1.8 gigapascals, or about 9,000 to 18,000 times the pressure of the atmosphere at sea level. This high pressure is within the range affordably reproducible by industry for bulk storage systems. By using different fluids around the material as it was squeezed, the scientists were able to create five new phases of material, two of which retained their new porous ability at normal pressure. The type of fluid used determined the shape of the sponge-like pores. This is the first time that hydrostatic pressure has been able to make dense materials with interpenetrated atomic frameworks into novel porous materials. Several series of in situ high-pressure X-ray powder diffraction experiments were performed at the 1-BM, 11-ID-B, and 17-BM beamlines of the APS to study the material transitions.

“By applying pressure, we were able to transform a normally dense, nonporous material into a range of new porous materials that can hold twice as much stuff,” Chapman said. “This counterintuitive discovery will likely double the amount of available porous framework materials, which will greatly expand their use in pharmaceutical delivery, sequestration, material separation and catalysis.”

The scientists will continue to test the new technique on other materials.

The research is funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science.
edit on 13-6-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)



 
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edit on 15/6/2013 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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does the material expand while the pressure is being applied or does it happen when they stop the pressure?



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:04 AM
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reply to post by PhoenixOD
 


The report details ''5 new phases'' of the material, and mentions varying pressure, it appears the variants are: materials, pressure and chemicals used in the pressure process, giving a variation of porosity within the 5 new phases.

Which suggests the expansion reactions start occurring at varying points whilst under pressure and perhaps stabilising or fulfilling their porosity potential after the pressure application.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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Ya something different to read and its pretty amazing. Thanks for bringing this news to ats truth.

Mind = Blown


Note to ats staff, we need a mind blown smiley
edit on 13-6-2013 by CitizenJack because: typo



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:11 AM
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That's exciting stuff. I don't believe it's all new physics though. Probably infill in existing models of physics. It may be new chemistry since it's at the molecular level. speculation here.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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Also interesting is that the material used was Zinc Cyanide, which has one of the largest negative coefficents of thermal expansion.

This interests me greatly as a possible step forwards for establishing possible materials found at Roswell and other reports of such of expanding / contracting shiny zinc like materials often cited in UFO sightings. And that the research facility is the Advanced Photon Source Lab that is also doing interesting research into Macromolecular Crystallography. Interesting place.

www.aps.anl.gov...


The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation’s (in fact, this hemisphere’s) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines.

These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose scale is measured in billionths of a meter, to name just a few examples. These studies promise to have far-reaching impact on our technology, economy, health, and our fundamental knowledge of the materials that make up our world.

The APS electron accelerator and storage system are the first critical steps in producing the high-energy x-rays that are used for frontier research.


No weather balloon comments please.
edit on 13-6-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)


 
Mod Edit: External Source Tags Instructions – Please Review This Link.
edit on 15/6/2013 by ArMaP because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:28 AM
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Deny Arrogance is the proper label...

Denying the "LAWS" of physics...

I bet when we are done...I mean when universe is
dying of old age, there will be trillions of new laws and
all of them broken or modyfied....

You cant do that, you cant do this, bla bla bla...

Arrogant turdheads....Think they no all...



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by theabsolutetruth
 


Pretty cool stuff.

I wonder if this could be used for deep sea exploration applications.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:46 AM
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same thing happens when I apply pressure to something in my pants.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by resoe26
 


I wish my wallet would expand under pressure!



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:53 AM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by resoe26
 


I wish my wallet would expand under pressure!



(If I were more specific on what I was referring to...it would have been deleted)



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 11:58 AM
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reply to post by resoe26
 


I know, you were referring you the sachet of ketchup, right?



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by Miccey
Deny Arrogance is the proper label...

Denying the "LAWS" of physics...

I bet when we are done...I mean when universe is
dying of old age, there will be trillions of new laws and
all of them broken or modyfied....

You cant do that, you cant do this, bla bla bla...

Arrogant turdheads....Think they no all...


The laws of physics are our best interpretation of the natural laws we see around us. Unless you believe every single particle in the universe is directly and constantly controlled by god, then there needs to be natural laws which dictate the way materials and forces interact with each other.

If you stand on a cliff and drop a rock, that rock will fall down the cliff. You can do it a million times, and it will likely fall down that cliff every time. Sure, some wise guy might put a trampoline at the bottom, or there might be a huge gust of a wind that catches the rock and sends it flying off course, but if we need to build some sort of technology around dropping rocks off cliffs, we use the most likely law we see which is "rocks dropping off cliffs always fall down" That's just a loose comparison but I hope you get where I'm going with it.

We cannot simply say "we have no idea" because number one, that's not true, we do have some idea of how the world around us works. And second of all, it's not helpful at all to say "we have no idea"

The computer you were on while making your message exists because scientists understand the world around them enough to turn a bunch of random materials into something that does everything your computer does. Then we need scientists that know enough about the world around them to make the internet function across the globe. We need scientists that know enough about the world to lay cables across the ocean flood. We need scientists to put satellites into space, we need scientists to make sure this whole network works most of the time.

If scientists were as ignorant as you say none of the things we take for granted like running water, electricity, TVs, computers, cell phones, modern clothes, modern food, devices to cook that food, medical services keeping you alive, none of these things would work.

Those things can only work if someone says "I know how the world works, and I can manipulate it to do something I want it to do" which is what you seem to be rallying against (along with tons of other science haters here on ATS)

If people just said "well this is my idea but it's probably wrong. And I have no idea how any of this works" NOTHING would get built, nothing would get done, nothing would work.

Scientists never say they know everything. Scientists never say they can't be wrong. The whole profession of being a scientist is to continually learn and expand your knowledge base. They love being wrong and proving each other wrong, because it's an opportunity to learn.

It's great to have alternative, new ideas. To challenge common scientific ideas. But you have to back it up with something. If I tell you I know how electricity works, and prove it by controlling electricity and making various things that use and produce it, I think that's pretty good evidence that I understand how electricity works.

Where as, if someone posts here on ATS how science is completely wrong about how electricity works, but has nothing to back it up, they have to accept that the guy who's job to work with electricity might know a bit more than them.

It seems you really have no idea what a scientists is or does, what the sciences in general are, or how they effect our lives on a daily basis. Because if you did, you'd understand how ridiculous your post sounded.

edit on 13-6-2013 by James1982 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
reply to post by resoe26
 


I know, you were referring you the sachet of ketchup, right?


nope. a stress ball.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 12:18 PM
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reply to post by James1982
 


I agree that science is awesome, and essential to evolution.

Perhaps the reference was about some posters on ATS that seem locked into 'known science' in that they only believe in that which is currently known and often discredited anything said about possibilities of 'unknown' science, such as those that deny the possibility of interdimensional / interstellar travel / the possibility of aliens / UFO being of extra terrestrial origin etc. just because it doesn't fit their current definition of science 'fact' and it's boundaries.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 12:39 PM
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This reminds me of our atmosphere. I think back before they actually went up there to measure the temperatures they calculated what they THOUGHT they'd be. Their calculations ended up being too linear. They were wrong. Instead they discovered that some areas were hot and some where cold. However, this doesn't mean the laws of physics were broken. It just means there're lots of variables we don't know about yet. Give us some time, and we'll figure out how this new material works.
edit on 13-6-2013 by jonnywhite because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 01:05 PM
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Originally posted by theabsolutetruth
Also interesting is that the material used was Zinc Cyanide, which has one of the largest negative coefficents of thermal expansion.

This interests me greatly as a possible step forwards for establishing possible materials found at Roswell and other reports of such of expanding / contracting shiny zinc like materials often cited in UFO sightings. And that the research facility is the Advanced Photon Source Lab that is also doing interesting research into Macromolecular Crystallography. Interesting place.

www.aps.anl.gov...


The Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Argonne National Laboratory provides this nation’s (in fact, this hemisphere’s) brightest storage ring-generated x-ray beams for research in almost all scientific disciplines.

These x-rays allow scientists to pursue new knowledge about the structure and function of materials in the center of the Earth and in outer space, and all points in between. The knowledge gained from this research can impact the evolution of combustion engines and microcircuits, aid in the development of new pharmaceuticals, and pioneer nanotechnologies whose scale is measured in billionths of a meter, to name just a few examples. These studies promise to have far-reaching impact on our technology, economy, health, and our fundamental knowledge of the materials that make up our world.

The APS electron accelerator and storage system are the first critical steps in producing the high-energy x-rays that are used for frontier research.


No weather balloon comments please.
edit on 13-6-2013 by theabsolutetruth because: (no reason given)


See you point...yes that's an interesting connection. Although, it's possible we'll understand and even replicate materials as you've described from Roswell, my thinking is it could be a combination of this process, but applied to different materials...like nitinol for example. (memory metal)

Imagine a sponge like version of Nitinol (nickel - titanium alloy) as an airframe...heat would cause it to snap into one configuration, while cooler temps would allow alternate shapes and configurations. A more aerodynamic 'sports model' shape for atmosphere, and an alternative shape for space travel or for taking on cargo etc.

The expansion under pressure would be handy for entry into an atmosphere from space, to deal with heat and friction or possibly as a shield for debris / weapons absorption maybe.

Whatever the case, it's interesting that this material they've come up with rocks the 'laws of physics' types...it's proof if nothing else, that laws in whatever form they take are a human notion and will always be broken or infringed.

Now then..wonder how many people are right now typing 'it's against the laws of physics' in a 'free energy thread'




posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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Like popcorn, except using pressure instead of heat!

Wierd but interesting!



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 03:52 PM
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Can some please post a "dummies version" of this thread? Just spent five minutes reading through this thread and have no clue what is going on. Either the meds for my broken leg are affecting my brain or this topic is waaaay over my head.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 04:12 PM
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I'm not sure if you can turn water into ice by applying lots of pressure ot it, but ice is less dense than water (i.e. it expands).





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