The deepest view ever obtained of Centaurus A

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posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 08:59 AM
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Originally posted by 3n19m470
reply to post by smithjustinb
 


Yeah, I wish someone would make a thread explaining this, complete with photos showing what it would look like if they just left them alone, and with minimal enhancements, and so on up to maximum enhancements. Then I could decide for myself if the beauty is worth the lies.

I can't be bothered to look it up on my own, or to even attempt a useless ats search. Someone has to make a new one.


to answer your question.... you will just see a greenish-grayish blob with your naked eye. The human eye is not colour sensitive at low intensity levels. your eye only starts to detect colours at higher levels. the telescope introduces the first ehancement, by gathering a couple of thousand times the light your eye can receive, and focussing it on your pupil. So, if you want to see what those objects really look like, go outside, without a telescope or binocular, and look at it.....

and NO, you are not allowed to use your camera, because your camera processes the image...... just look at the image, and if you draw it, make sure you draw it correctly, with the correct colours, etc, else you will be manipulating the image.
edit on 15/6/2013 by Hellhound604 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 10:50 AM
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reply to post by Hellhound604
 


Good point about seeing it with your own eyes. In big binoculars or a typical backyard telescope, you migh see a hint of green, but otherwise it's b&w. In larger telescopes, you can see yellow in bright nebulae, such as in Carina Nebula. With a huge telescope, you can see all the colours. (haven't tried it myself, but saw someone else reporting that)

P.S. one of my favourite astrohpotographers: www.rc-astro.com... although his images might be too vivid for taste.





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