It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

New bill NJ; Police can confiscate cellphones at accident scenes ,no warrant.

page: 4
12
<< 1  2  3    5 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Jun, 10 2013 @ 11:41 PM
link   
reply to post by CosmicCitizen
 



They could always just drop em on the ground and step on em when they go to pick it up. "Opps, I'm such a klutz!" Then blame the cop, "I thought you had a hold of it! My bad?"




posted on Jun, 10 2013 @ 11:44 PM
link   
If I got into an accident, and I destroyed my phone, would that be destruction of evidence? Could they pin me with a felony for having a busted phone?



posted on Jun, 10 2013 @ 11:51 PM
link   
Regardless of their stupid law, if the cops got into my phone my company's attorney's would have a field day with them. My device's have to be encrypted due to the sensitive information on them and I am under contract not to share my encryption key with anyone under any circumstances including the police. The cops would have to crack my key which would be next to impossible unless they have about 2500 years to waste on it, and even if they did crack the key my company's attorney's would nail them to the wall with multiple lawsuits. They wouldn't be real happy that they accessed all of our customers private data without permission, valid warrant or just cause.



posted on Jun, 10 2013 @ 11:54 PM
link   

Originally posted by EViLKoNCEPTz
Regardless of their stupid law, if the cops got into my phone my company's attorney's would have a field day with them. My device's have to be encrypted due to the sensitive information on them and I am under contract not to share my encryption key with anyone under any circumstances including the police. The cops would have to crack my key which would be next to impossible unless they have about 2500 years to waste on it, and even if they did crack the key my company's attorney's would nail them to the wall with multiple lawsuits. They wouldn't be real happy that they accessed all of our customers private data without permission, valid warrant or just cause.


It makes me all warm and fuzzy inside knowing that you are so well protected by your employer and their team of legal counsel. Most people would be totally screwed in that situation with very little practical recourse. I can only hope they get to you first so that your company's lawyers can take it to a higher court for invalidation.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:11 AM
link   
reply to post by frost47
 


I don't live in New Jersey and have no plans on visiting that landfill anytime in the future. I'm not the only person who works somewhere that requires data security and it won't be long before they try to use this stupid law on someone in a situation such as mine. This law won't hold up long after the first person with an NDA gets hit and their company sues New Jersey into bankruptcy.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:13 AM
link   
I use a cell phone so infrequently I usually have to relearn how the damned thing works when I do need it... What in the hell is wrong with people that have to constantly be on the phone even if it causes a dangerous situation for themselves and others or at the least is distracting to others... People that talk on cell phones are a safety hazard and should be fined at least as much when involved in a collision as a person that causes an accident while speeding or driving recklessly..



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:17 AM
link   
I was just wondering. .. .

How about those of Us that do Not have a phone, for whatever reason.

Are they going to try and Beat it out of Us until they figure out we don't have one?

hummmmmm .. . ..

Should I get one of those cheap $5 phones to prevent an @$$ whipping?

Just wondering is all

Now,. . about those who have one and say they don't? How is that going to work .. ? Are they going to take an @$$ whipping too until they give it up .. .?

It kind of reminds me of the FaceBook ordeal with employers. Around here if you want to get a job they will ask for your FaceBook ID and password. If you tell them you don't have one you do not get a job.

So what are they going to do if you don't have one?



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:19 AM
link   
reply to post by hypervigilant
 


Umm, you already get a careless/reckless driving ticket if you're on the phone when an accident occurs. Some states call it distracted driving, but all 50 states have the same law. This law is nothing more than a way for them to get access to your text messages, call logs, email and other data to try and find something else to nail you with. It's a clear violation of the 4th amendment, and some may be inclined to exercise their 2nd amendment rights to prove that point. Technically it's armed robbery since the cops are armed and they are taking your property without just cause or permission.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:22 AM
link   

Originally posted by EViLKoNCEPTz
reply to post by hypervigilant
 

Technically it's armed robbery since the cops are armed and they are taking your property without just cause or permission.




Would love to see that on the news.

A Very High Priced Lawyer may be able to win that one.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:33 AM
link   
reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


Since this law is for NJ it probably won't be long before you get your wish. Some hot head will probably pop a cop and claim self defense. If it was a plain clothes officer the case would definitely have legs. IDK about a uniformed officer, it would be a little harder to play victim that way.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:43 AM
link   
Thought you would find this app of interest.

ACLU-NJ Releases Police Accountability Smartphone App





The Android “Police Tape” app records video and audio discreetly, disappearing from the screen once the recording begins to prevent any attempt by police to squelch the recording. In addition to keeping a copy on the phone itself, the user can choose to send it to the ACLU-NJ for backup storage and analysis of possible civil liberties violations.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:46 AM
link   

Originally posted by roadgravel
Seems a lot of people have no problem giving up their freedoms. Fine, just don't make it so mine are taken away.


But your freedom is the most tasty!

All of their freedom was worthless anyways it was too easy to get.

Your's though, that's ye grande olde prize.

They are probably coming soon.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 12:48 AM
link   

Originally posted by terriblyvexed
If you are in an accident in a big rig the first thing they do is check your phone.
It helps one take the initiative not to text, and drive.

I'll be the bad guy, and say this is an invasion of privacy we should support.

This really can save lives, texting while driving is a very real, and very deadly habit.


What lives will he saved by this law?

What a load of nonsense.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 09:33 AM
link   
reply to post by PtolemyII
 


If a less restrictive, alternate course of action which could identify if a party was using the phone and when, exists, then I see no reason why such a bill should be passed. An alternate course of actions exists, which was alluded to in the article - the police may subpena the service provider. Seem rational to me.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 10:09 AM
link   
reply to post by MrWendal
 
I understand what you are saying, but maybe I should have explained the situation a little better. The reason they were walking down the sidewalk was because it was directly after a huge parade and there were people, especially tons of children, walking EVERYWHERE. This parade is a huge tradition in our town, and everyone knows to be especially careful before and after the parade. The guy was a local and KNEW to pay extra attention to his driving at that particular time, and yet just couldn't wait until he got to a stop light to do his texting. He was just extremely lucky that he didn't plow into a group of little kids.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 10:21 AM
link   
This doesn't surprise me. California peace officers confiscated witnesses cellphones after a police beating about a month ago here without a warrant because it was considered as evidence. I'll tell ya sometimes the laws are one step ahead in the game.

On a personal note. I have lookout security on my galaxy s4 and if they decide to take my mine for any reason, well I can just remotely wipe the data clean and that would kill that noise.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 10:48 AM
link   
reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


By a dead cell phone on ebay for five cents and keep it in your car to hand over.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 10:51 AM
link   
reply to post by PtolemyII
 


How long until the have a justification to confiscate everything valuable in the car without a warrant?
All police do is beat people up, take things and write up reports about beating people and taking things - Do we really need to pay for that? We are no safer for it.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 10:59 AM
link   
Obviously standard operating proceedure will now be to immediately smash yer cell phone all the hell right after a collision.......case closed.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 11:20 AM
link   
reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


That's a really good point. Not for nothing ,if your glove compartment is locked ,they cannot search it without a warrant so......



new topics

top topics



 
12
<< 1  2  3    5 >>

log in

join