New Evidence of The Early Earth’s Crust

page: 1
2

log in

join

posted on Jun, 8 2013 @ 12:02 PM
link   
I don't know why I feel this one could be considered vital information one day.


Washington, D.C.— Scientists have long believed that lava erupted from certain oceanic volcanoes contains materials from the early Earth’s crust. But decisive evidence for this phenomenon has proven elusive. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Erik Hauri demonstrates that oceanic volcanic rocks contain samples of recycled crust dating back to the Archean era 2.5 billion years ago. Their work is published in Nature.


Wonder what a similar future investigation on Mars could reveal to us. Can this information lead us to a future procedure, to induce a manmade enviroment in other worlds? Mankind is learning the Elohim's recipes of creation.


This indicates that the sulfur comes from a deep mantle reservoir containing crustal material subducted before the Great Oxidation Event and preserved for over half the age of the Earth.

“These measurements place the first firm age estimates of recycled material in oceanic hotspots,” Hauri said. “They confirm the cycling of sulfur from the atmosphere and oceans into mantle and ultimately back to the surface,” Hauri said.

Caption: Sulfur isotopes within iron sulfide inclusions in volcanic rocks, like this one from Iceland, demonstrate that sulfur derived from the Earth's ancient atmosphere was preserved within the mantle for at least 2.54 billion years before coming back to the surface in eruptions at Mangaia volcano, South Pacific Ocean. Sulfide inclusion is 50 µm in diameter, light gray mineral in lower-left is olivine, darker-gray material surrounding inclusion is volcanic glass.


carnegiescience.edu...




posted on Jun, 8 2013 @ 12:05 PM
link   
reply to post by Trueman
 


interesting,, i wonder if the baltic anomaly could be useful in this kind of research,
especially because its relatively young...



posted on Jun, 8 2013 @ 12:32 PM
link   

Originally posted by solve
reply to post by Trueman
 


interesting,, i wonder if the baltic anomaly could be useful in this kind of research,
especially because its relatively young...


I'm not sure if we are prepared for whatever they discover next to this, but that won't stop us.



posted on Jun, 11 2013 @ 05:55 PM
link   
I don't see us figuring out anything useful in our lifetime. We can't even manage a way to keep vehicles going without the use of gasoline (well...we can, but choose not to), let alone travel somewhere new fast enough to create a new place to live. Even if we do figure something out, maybe we should try to use it to fix our own planet before creating new areas.



posted on Jun, 15 2013 @ 11:53 AM
link   

Originally posted by Trueman
I don't know why I feel this one could be considered vital information one day.


Washington, D.C.— Scientists have long believed that lava erupted from certain oceanic volcanoes contains materials from the early Earth’s crust. But decisive evidence for this phenomenon has proven elusive. New research from a team including Carnegie’s Erik Hauri demonstrates that oceanic volcanic rocks contain samples of recycled crust dating back to the Archean era 2.5 billion years ago. Their work is published in Nature.


Wonder what a similar future investigation on Mars could reveal to us. Can this information lead us to a future procedure, to induce a manmade enviroment in other worlds? Mankind is learning the Elohim's recipes of creation.


This indicates that the sulfur comes from a deep mantle reservoir containing crustal material subducted before the Great Oxidation Event and preserved for over half the age of the Earth.

“These measurements place the first firm age estimates of recycled material in oceanic hotspots,” Hauri said. “They confirm the cycling of sulfur from the atmosphere and oceans into mantle and ultimately back to the surface,” Hauri said.

Caption: Sulfur isotopes within iron sulfide inclusions in volcanic rocks, like this one from Iceland, demonstrate that sulfur derived from the Earth's ancient atmosphere was preserved within the mantle for at least 2.54 billion years before coming back to the surface in eruptions at Mangaia volcano, South Pacific Ocean. Sulfide inclusion is 50 µm in diameter, light gray mineral in lower-left is olivine, darker-gray material surrounding inclusion is volcanic glass.


carnegiescience.edu...


Interesting finding/research.



If "“These measurements place the first firm age estimates of recycled material in oceanic hotspots,” then this confirms the statement "old is new and new is old".

This then begs the question - how reliable are dating methods when used on fossils?





 
2

log in

join