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98.7% Proven Meditation Technique

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posted on Jun, 8 2013 @ 09:25 PM
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Originally posted by pteridine
This was 15 minutes of concentrated tinnitus.

The quiet after the racket was most conducive to meditation.


We're all on our own journey though. For some it's very difficult to "stop thinking" and just let go of everything. For me personally as a newbie to all of this, the sound helps quite a bit. Or maybe it's just my perception that it does, so it does? The thing is I've meditated a little without it, and it just takes a lot longer for me to get to that place I want to be, if even at all. I'm not saying I CAN'T achieve the same thing without it, there's something to this that helps quite a bit. I forgot to mention a sort've spinning feeling I started having while listening to this, like there was a left and a right somewhere within and the two were just spinning or even swapping places, I could almost feel the momentum back and forth as it was happening. If that makes sense at all I'll be glad, lol. How long have you been meditating my friend?
edit on 8-6-2013 by Hiasyouwant because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 8 2013 @ 09:36 PM
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reply to post by Hiasyouwant
 


50 years



posted on Jun, 8 2013 @ 11:49 PM
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I actually tried this for about 2 weeks straight not to long ago.
I enjoy a lot of the binaural beats and ASMR sounds for relaxation and I have to say this is fairly unique.
It doesn't work well for falling asleep but it does induce some enjoyable meditative sensations.
definitely in my "favorites" category.



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 01:22 AM
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reply to post by Hiasyouwant
 


I really enjoyed this, very, very relaxing. That was the fastest 15 minutes I can remember in a long time.

I'll be repeating this everyday for at least the next two weeks to see what kind of improvements I might attain.

Thank you very much for posting this!


S&F



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 01:37 AM
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Originally posted by hellobruce

Originally posted by Hiasyouwant
Professor Jeffery Marlon Harris BM, MRCP, FRCs.


Slight problem, there is no Jeffery Marlon Harris FRCS registered as a Fellow at the Royal College of Surgeons.


researchers at the University of Pembrokeshire,


Another small problem, there is no University of Pembrokeshire....

but apart from those small problems....


So the lead up was part of the neurolinguistic programming.

It sounds disorienting. There is a pattern there that if it corresponded to a grid it'd be a multi pointed star. It sounds like there is an embedded word "sleep" as the sound gets closer and tinnier. So it could be shutting down a layer of consciousness related to irritation, or putting it to sleep, and also there is an "awake" embedded in the lower tones. The sound persuades the brainwaves to sync to the polarized tones, following the pendulum like swing, leading to denying the natural awareness of irritating sound in unconsciousness, and accepting the lower tones. So the listener wakes to silence and yeah it feels like less pain.

Like using a bee sting to fight arthritis or chili peppers to tolerate a hot day.

Programming. Silent sound. Downside is the sleep command. I thought doctor types would avoid unconsciousness suggestions in programming. We need to be awake for the higher pitched tones. They are often indicators of danger that ought to be attended to.

If you heard that and thought it was okay a part of your mind was sleeping. Wake it up, will yourself awake.



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 02:19 AM
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It gave me a headache, everytime the sound was switching between speakers it felt like a band was going across my head. Interesting though, but I do not think I could meditate with it. When I closed my eyes, it reminded me of being inside and MRI machine.



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 02:35 AM
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reply to post by pteridine
 


What a convenient number.

I don't believe you!



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 03:05 AM
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Reporting back. To be honest. I didn't like it. It just reminded me of the urban environment and metal. I like the sound of the Wood Pigeon, black bird and wind running through the trees. A far more interesting and connecting choice of sounds. I also like to focus on the silence between sounds.

Listening to natural sounds helps you understand the process of your thinking. As in thoughts are like sounds, they come, they go, some you like,some you don't. You learn not to judge the sounds or the thoughts. This is just what I'm learning, I may be wrong.

One of my favorite meditations, is the calm relaxing voice of Mooji.




posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 07:53 AM
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Just listened to it again. And again I find myself 'turned on'. Not in a sexual way, however. But stimulated at the 'root-chakra', to refer to a system often associated with meditation - by lack of another 'explanation'.

Anyone else experiences this kind of stimulation down under?



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 10:25 AM
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reply to post by Hiasyouwant
 


wth its free



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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Nice! I've been sitting for a few years, and honesty didn't expect to get anything out of this. Sure enough it had my energy moving and helped me get into a meditative state rather quickly.

I treated it like a mantra, gently focusing my awareness on the sound, noticing thoughts as they come up. When I noticed my awareness drifting off of the sound, I gently brought it back. What surprised me was my state immediately after the 15 minute track ended - usually it is much more difficult / takes longer to get to that state. I'll definitely be saving this one!

IMO it needs to be done with headphones for the full effect. There's also an hour long track for those interested (from the same channel).

Thanks, OP!



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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reply to post by RothchildRancor
 


Ok, it's really 51 years but +/- 2% doesn't matter much at this point. I took a TM course in 1962 [or whatever it was called in the early 60's] before it became all the rage later on. I understand that it is now quite expensive but at the time the high school activities center offered it at no cost. They were probably trying to calm the delinquents. It didn't work because those that took it were already calm and those that were delinquent were too busy boosting cars.

Back ooom topic; the dissonance is so annoying to me that it hinders meditation. If you like it and it helps, use it.
Pragmatism.



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 01:52 PM
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I just listened to the whole thing. My ears are buzzing, my head is buzzing, and I feel a bit more relaxed.


What I saw during the sound meditation was a golden figure eight with a ball of sound (earth)
following the track, kind of cool.
edit on 9-6-2013 by Darkblade71 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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reply to post by Hiasyouwant
 

Good luck with your explorations.

Some people are more comfortable with guidance in these matters and others prefer to go it alone for the most part. Generally speaking with meditation it is easy to gets results of some sort, even if one is not using an accelerator like the audio track we are talking about. In long established disciplines like Buddhism people tend to gingerly dip a toe into the water for a while, adjusting to a new approach to the mind, establishing certain default attitudes and practices designed to ground them comfortably before they move into deeper, hitherto unexperienced experiences.

To each his own.



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 03:42 PM
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reply to post by hellobruce
 


you just earned yourself a star from me


don't waste your time on something from a questionable source

thanks



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 04:31 PM
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reply to post by pteridine
 


If you want a free (and much more thorough) version of TM, check out AYP (advanced yoga practices)

It has extensive lessons (all free) covering all eight limbs. Their 'deep meditation' is very similar to Transcendental Meditation. Plus, there's a support forum with a very active community if you have any questions.

The material is also available on amazon, if you want a hard copy.



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 04:34 PM
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Originally posted by woodwardjnr
Reporting back. To be honest. I didn't like it. It just reminded me of the urban environment and metal. I like the sound of the Wood Pigeon, black bird and wind running through the trees. A far more interesting and connecting choice of sounds. I also like to focus on the silence between sounds.


Wasn't a fan either, the sound felt like some dark recess of hell, a lonely metalworking part nobody visits



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 07:21 PM
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reply to post by ddaniel
 


Thanks, Dan, I'll give it a look.



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 09:56 PM
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I liked this piece, with the first 30 seconds, or so, silent, allowing me to stash my iPad outside of my daughter's door and walk away. A minute later she's running down the stairs screaming: "The aliens are coming to get me... Again!"



posted on Jun, 9 2013 @ 10:19 PM
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Originally posted by pteridine
reply to post by RothchildRancor
 


Ok, it's really 51 years but +/- 2% doesn't matter much at this point. I took a TM course in 1962 [or whatever it was called in the early 60's] before it became all the rage later on. I understand that it is now quite expensive but at the time the high school activities center offered it at no cost. They were probably trying to calm the delinquents. It didn't work because those that took it were already calm and those that were delinquent were too busy boosting cars.

Back ooom topic; the dissonance is so annoying to me that it hinders meditation. If you like it and it helps, use it.
Pragmatism.


I will look into it thanks!





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