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China: a plane hit by a UFO?

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posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 04:12 AM
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Hoax. The object creating that hole on the plain is big. If there had been a collision in the air, all the passengers and pilots would have been in the heaven now.




posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by PHDIKOULAS
 


All the reports are the same. It looks remarkably consistent with bird, or hail damage to me.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 04:15 AM
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reply to post by Xnibiru
 


It's no bigger than some of the bird strike damage that has been seen (and remarkably smaller than some), which include a few that are just dents in the radome. Planes land with this much damage, and more, all the time (just look at some of the more severe bird strike photos.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 05:54 AM
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Originally posted by jude11
Does it only take 20 minutes to reach 26,000 ft?

Don't know and can't find it.

Peace
The answer to your question depends on a number of variables. The first is aircraft weight. Empty, you might see 6,000 feet per minute climb at low altitudes. Even heavy, you might get 2,500 feet per minute. Another variable is atmospheric temperature. The normal climb profile for our 757s is based on speeds. 250 knots (287 mph) up to 10,000 feet, then 280-330 knots until mach crossover speed of .74 mach, then at .72-.75, depending on weight and ISA. The heavier you are, the faster the optimal climb speed. It is very doable to get 26,000 feet in 20 minutes



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 06:02 AM
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If it was a bird.......
wheres the blood?



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 06:05 AM
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Originally posted by peashooter
What can the plane hit while rolling on tarmac to create a huge circular crater? The control tower? Another parked plane which bumped it nose to nose?

So if it was a collision on tarmac the object just vanished after the plane hit it?

It is what it is, the plane hit an unidentified flying object while in the air.



what about a stair car?

or perhaps a hail stone?



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 06:36 AM
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just sayin'
supposedly the pictures were taken by a passenger.
No passenger would have been able to take a picture from top of the nose perspective as seen on pics.
Therefore maintenance crew pics. Therefore the whole story is to be questioned.
I would say collision on tarmac while parking or so...



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 06:42 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by gortex
 

Stupid bird.
Got no business getting in front of a plane flying 500 miles an hour.


Bet the bird didn't have insurance either.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 07:52 AM
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Originally posted by shell69
reply to post by smurfy
 


I would not dispute whether or not fowls of any sort could FLY at that altitude, and would never want to make the argument about whether it "could be" a bird of any sort. Rather, could a bird or "birds" make a freaking dent in an airplane like that?????


No your'e right birdies can and do fly at that height, I just don't think it was a bird.
The point of the video was about thinking time, and closing speeds, you would see virtually nothing, and the airliner was climbing, and whatever hit it, was also either climbing or descending and hit at an oblique angle.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 08:04 AM
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Originally posted by paradiselost333
If it was a bird.......
wheres the blood?


The Radome is relatively soft compared to the fuselage... basically a plastic/composite bubble. It probably absorbed enough of the impact, judging from the depth of the dent, to leave the carcass intact. You can also see how the strike was deflected to one side, which would also lessen the impact. Had it been something hard like a large hail stone or weather balloon payload I would expect to see more damage to the radome and front of the plane.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 08:05 AM
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Originally posted by works4dhs

Originally posted by Phage
reply to post by gortex
 

Stupid bird.
Got no business getting in front of a plane flying 500 miles an hour.


Bet the bird didn't have insurance either.


probably one of those migratory birds, going where it likes hitting whoever's planes it likes with impunity!



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 08:29 AM
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Bird hits on planes are usually pretty messy. This one has all of the earmarks from a large hail stone. Just google on hail hitting the nose cone of aircraft, and you'll see this is a much more common occurrence than you might think.

Also, 26000' is pretty high for most birds, making the odds of it that much more unlikely.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 08:42 AM
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reply to post by jude11
 


Hello Jude,
Suggest you google Boeing aircraft specs by type rating < boeing 757 climb rate >
VVI= is vertical climb rate in feet per second.

Altitude and flying time in the story is well within the capability of the aircraft.

This is a bird strike, very unusual at that altitude but things happen.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


Not that im fully subscribing to the bird strike, if the plane passed through any cloud on the way down the water droplets might have washed blood evidence clean away since the fuselage was not actually breached.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 09:38 AM
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edit on 7-6-2013 by CosmicQuest because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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reply to post by draknoir2
 


Hail actually doesn't do as much damage as you would think. Small to medium hailstones can only leave dents in wherever they hit. A larger hailstone will tear open the radome similar to a bird strike.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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How do we know, that the actual Nose cone on the plane didnt fail itself, causing the nose of the plane to suck in. aluminum is not very hard to bend.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 11:31 AM
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reply to post by Glassbender777
 


The radome is actually fiberglass, or a composite material usually, not aluminum. Radar doesn't go through aluminum very well, so they had to come up with something better, that's transparent to radar.

But in this case, the damaged paint is usually an indication that something impacted the outside of the radome, instead of it collapsing due to aerodynamic stresses.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 12:34 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by Xnibiru
 


It's no bigger than some of the bird strike damage that has been seen (and remarkably smaller than some), which include a few that are just dents in the radome. Planes land with this much damage, and more, all the time (just look at some of the more severe bird strike photos.


My first google:

757 Birdstrike



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by draknoir2
 


You can find similar damage from hail as well.




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