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Police Officer Shoots My Dog, $1800 Fine

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posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 09:48 AM
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The problem with certain breeds isn't so much due to temperament, but in the WAY that they bite and latch on. That is where the danger and injury comes from. My boxer has pit in him, and my lab has chow in him. When we have people over, we put a very humane basket style muzzle on each (expensive ones, but worth it, as they are far more comfortable for the dogs, they can drink with them on, and they don't come off), and then put them in a large (almost lot-sized) fenced in area outside that has lots of shade, and a large water bowl, instead of in the house. If we interact with the dogs while the guests are over (as many of our friends love the dogs), we still play it safe with the muzzles. No reason not to.

Generally, they'd be more prone to lick a person all over, but you never know when there is just something they read in someone, that sets them off (or they get rough with each other, and someone tries to join in the play, etc.), so better to be safe than sorry.
edit on 7-6-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


Actraullay... aren't Golden Retrievers, according to statistics meant to be the leaders in attacks against humans? I feel sorry for the pitbulls as they have such a bad reputation and yet are such loving creatures. I am so sorry for your loss. My late Boxer dog used to play with two Pitbulls regularly and never once hurt my pup. Once again... I am so sorry for your loss. Your dog is OK now and in a better place.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 10:13 AM
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Originally posted by DarthMuerte
I am sorry about your dog, but what about responsibility? It sounds like the dog has slipped his leash and also gotten out of your yard multiple times. Why didn't you either a) take action to secure your dog better while he is outside, or b) leave the dog inside until you can be outside with him? Consider this an expensive lesson in personal responsibility and learn from your mistake instead of blaming others for them.


My condolences to you, as when I was growing up we had pitbulls ourselves so I also know first hand how docile they are as a breed. It's only when they're trained to be killers that they become killers.

That said, I gotta agree with the above poster. You might have had a case if this was the first time the dog slipped its leash but you admitted this was a common occurance...and you did nothing to correct it. We also had a German Shepard who was such a strong animal it would repeatedly break either the collar or pull the pin it was tied to right out of the ground. We had to resort to using a freaking anchor chain to keep the dog tied.

The point is, we recognized there was a problem and we corrected it. What did you do to correct your own problem other than just tie the dog back up with the same collar and leash you knew the dog could escape from?



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 10:15 AM
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if someone ever shot my pit, i would tell them to #ing shoot me too, because thats my best friend. you can call me crazy or whatever. but if they shot him id try to kill the shooter, and hopefully for their benefit, theyd kill me first, before i got to them. the only thing my pit would ever do to someone is lick them to death.
all the media hype about pits, is why they have a bad name. you could raise any dog to be mean and aggresive. its bull im sorry for your loss. and i would fight that fine.
thats absolutley rediculous.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 10:16 AM
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i had a dalmatian before my pit, and that dog was viscious even though i brought it up the same way. there was something in him that would just snap. ive been bitten by many diff breeds but that one was the worst. and i still loved him anyways.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 10:17 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


We put the dog in the back yard on a chain with a collar that has spikes in it that tightens as he pulls.

I just can't rustle up sympathy for anyone who'd leave a dog on a leash that has SPIKES THAT TIGHTEN WHEN HE PULLS.

I'm sorry the dog it dead - but not sorry for you.

I lost a dog to poisoning - I realize there is NO way anyone can keep an eye on their dog every minute of the day - but give me a freakin' break - spikes that tighten when he pulls. That's just freakin' WRONG.

peace

edit on 7-6-2013 by silo13 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 11:38 AM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 12:10 PM
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Sorry you had to go through all this.

Most dogs will defend themselves when attacked as would most people.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 12:17 PM
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reply to post by whenandwhere
 



This is true , there are some natural triggers , but very early socialization with others dogs when they are pups helps tremendously . But this is a two way street , both dogs need to be well socialized . If my dog was attacked by another dog , I would not fault her for fighting back . This is why all dog owners should socialize their dogs at a very early age .


All well and good if you can get them at an early age. Both of our large dogs are rescues....and we got them when they were already a few years old...so while we are in the process of socializing them more, and training them more, it would have been way more helpful if we had them sooner. Hence our precautions.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 12:22 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 



reply to post by Dianec
 





It would be nice to know how to break up a dog fight too. In general. Hate seein that go down.


Me to. I think im going to research that out of curiosity now that you mention it.


The best method we've found is going to sound stupid, but it is 100% effective, at least with our dogs. An air horn or anti-barking spray (it's really just an aerosol can like computer cleaner to make a loud hiss sound) breaks their focus and gives them something immediate to retreat from. Carry one of them with you on your walks.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 12:37 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


I still think the solution should be to hold the owner accountable for any crimes committed. If that were a toddler instead of another dog, I think you should be held for manslaughter. You are lucky that all it did was kill another violent dog.

Two negligent owners of dangerous animals with two dead dangerous animals. It is a bittersweet solution but one that might have prevented far more serious problems. You are fortunate to only have a fine and lose your dog.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 12:44 PM
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post removed for serious violation of ATS Terms & Conditions



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 01:04 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


That statement I made about the dogs representing the ownerswas more of a general one.

If you treat your dog like crap-kick it-starve it-fight it-feed it raw meat and gunpowder-
.... than it will more than likely have an attitude problem.

All creatures have triggers- Even us.

Would you stop defending yourself if attacked or threatened? If I was the pitt bull- and some rott was trying to loc up on me- I dont think I would have done any differently.
Same goes with any animal who is trying to kill you.

Dogs arent stupid- They do indeed take on traits of their masters- if not- than master isnt doing their part.

Spend time with your animals- and you all wont have to use spiked collars, they will stay by your side willingly.

...even rescue dogs. But you have to put in the time and the work.

If you cant do either- than get yourself a goldfish.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 01:11 PM
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reply to post by Common Good
 



But you have to put in the time and the work.


Absolutely. Often, the only reward they need for anything is just showing them some love. It's funny, but anyone who's seen my pet menagerie (like in the Members forum, pets thread), will know we have a lot of animals. At night, when watching some TV, each of us will have animals huddled all around. I usually sit in my chair and have a dog in my lap, a cat on my chest, and a cockatoo on my shoulder, while our other cats and dogs perch and snuggle with my wife, my stepson, and our ranch hand gal on couches.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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Originally posted by RothchildRancor
I don't believe in keeping a dog outside by itself.

That in itself is the practice of a cruel owner.

I am sure every chicken, sheep, and goat owner will agree with this. NOT!



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 01:56 PM
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OP, I am sorry you feel that people are in their "Ivory Towers" about this, but you were just plain irresponsible.

You stated in your OP that the dog would often get away and one of the neighbors would bring him back. That means that you were not even aware that it had happened.

You knew the dog had a history of escaping, yet tried the exact same solution that had repeatedly failed in the past - tying him outside in a collar (and not just a collar, a training collar which is not a typical day to day use collar).

You hold 100% responsibility for this and frankly should think long and hard before ever getting another dog.

But, I don't see you doing that, so at least before you do please read up on the proper care and training of a dog. Look at responsible ways to contain the dog for walks (ie a harness), only use a choke-chain/pinch collar for the intended use of training and correction when ON LEASH, do not leave your dog unattended tied up in an open yard - not only for the safety of others but for the safety of your dog (other lose dogs would have an easy time killing your pet if you do not have it contained - fences/runs offer protection both to and from dogs).

Had you done some simple prevention (a run kennel outside for it to run in, underground invisible fencing - far cheaper than the 1800 ticket you got) you would have saved money and saved the lives of 2 dogs.

You can try to shirk it all that you want, but you were an irresponsible pet owner.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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If the dog was only being put out in the yard for a short period of time, and there are issues with the dog getting away, and there is no fence. The easiest solution would be to simply walk the dog instead of tying it up.

Every dog I've had, we went for walks. I don't believe I've ever tied a dog up, and out of the five dogs I've had in my life only one got out and it only happened one time. She was a greyhound I had just opened the front door and she ran up to greet me. She spotted a rabbit across the street and off she went. Took 15 minutes but we got her back inside, and it never happened again.

I feel sympathy, and it doesn't mean that overall the OP was an irresponsible owner... but the solution is simple, actually spend some time with your pet and take a nice walk.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 01:59 PM
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Originally posted by dirtybird
i had a dalmatian before my pit, and that dog was viscious even though i brought it up the same way. there was something in him that would just snap. ive been bitten by many diff breeds but that one was the worst. and i still loved him anyways.


I had a Dalmation too before my pits. They're pretty weird dogs.



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 03:09 PM
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I don't believe in keeping a dog outside by itself.

That in itself is the practice of a cruel owner.


Depends on factors I suppose. Often, my two big dogs are out together, but occasionally, they are out alone too. They chase butterflies and birds (and squirrels), dig, run around, and then bark at the door when they want back in. Of course, they also have a big area too, they are so spoiled.

As for other animals (like those mentioned by another), grazing animals of course, prefer to be left out. The horses (for example) are outside grazing in the pastures overnight (during the summer). In the day, they are in their stalls with fans on them, and out of the blazing sun, inside the stables (designed for lots of wind pass-through). Kind of apples and oranges there. Dogs need to be around people though. Luckily, there is always somebody home at the ranch.

Fencing can be expensive, but there are inexpensive alternatives. I don't have a handy pic, but you can see it somewhat in the background of this pic below (look past the people in the background, for the squares).

These fences are used for the horses, but we also use them for the dog area. They are simple and cheap to make. The posts are about 4" diameter (8' long), and cost about $4 each (set them to where about 4 1/2 feet are above ground). The grid wire panels are 16 feet long, 4 feet high, and cost about $18 each. A gate will likely cost about $75. The only real tool needed is a post-hole digger, which can be had for about $20. Fasten the wire grid to the posts (1 post about every 4 feet) with wire and/or fence staples (I prefer to use both).


(My wife (right) with a friend's grandchildren, and our ranch hand (left) along with one of the horses, "Kay-tee")
edit on 7-6-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 7 2013 @ 03:28 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
reply to post by whenandwhere
 



This is true , there are some natural triggers , but very early socialization with others dogs when they are pups helps tremendously . But this is a two way street , both dogs need to be well socialized . If my dog was attacked by another dog , I would not fault her for fighting back . This is why all dog owners should socialize their dogs at a very early age .


All well and good if you can get them at an early age. Both of our large dogs are rescues....and we got them when they were already a few years old...so while we are in the process of socializing them more, and training them more, it would have been way more helpful if we had them sooner. Hence our precautions.


First off , I commend you for rescuing . Our big ol' scary looking 16 pound , VERY manly Shih Tzu/Terrier mix is a rescue . We saved her the day before she was to be "destroyed" because she was ill and ugly as home made sin so no one wanted her .

I was not trying to be argumentative with you because I agree , it is tougher socializing older dogs but as long as humane precautions (as you described with the muzzles , are they soft muzzles?) are practiced and they have a safe and secure place to be placed when you have company in your home then it is all good .


Also , from what you describe , you are a responsible owner and taking the time to train and socialize your "older" dogs . Not everyone does this , and actually many see pit bulls and other large breeds as some sort of status symbol and want them mean (this is not aimed at the OP in any way) and never takes the time to train them properly .



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