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Stunning Find Deep in the Pacific Ocean

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posted on Nov, 6 2004 @ 11:35 PM
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Stunning Find Deep in the Pacific Ocean
Ancient star dust found deep beneath the Pacific Ocean has led German scientists to make an astounding conclusion. They think it points to our human origins.

Researchers from the Technical University of Munich in Germany surmise that the star dust is likely debris from a supernova explosion that occurred some 3 million years ago, reports Reuters. The explosion rocked the Earth so much that it changed our planet's climate--drastically heating it up--and helped bring about human evolution just as our ancestors started to walk.

Study leader Gunther Korschinek speculates that the supernova may have caused an increase in cosmic rays for about 300,000 years, which would have warmed up the Earth's temperatures. Korschinek can tell that the star explosion occurred at the same time there was a significant climate change in Africa when drier conditions caused the forests to retreat and the savannah to emerge, reports Reuters. It's this major climate change that likely caused the hominids to emerge from the trees and begin to walk upright.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.




posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 12:59 AM
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That's a very interesting happening. Very. And I wonder this, though. Are they saying the reason we evolved into walking up right is because the trees started to disappear? It makes me think that all creatures adapt to areas they live in when changes happen but there is still some things that doesn't make sense if this is true.

But any other way, this is a very interesting. I know I keep saying it but it is.

*Edit* Another question. Why would the star dust make thinking evolve from one animal to the next? Would Radiation have taken into play here? Could the radiation from the Super Nova explosion cause a mutation for the better in quite a few creatures starting to walk up right? Especially if the planet was exposed for 300 Thousand years. If we was exposed that long, it could be statistically possible. And I'm not saying I believe this, I'm throwing theories out there before people start looking at me funny.

[edit on 7-11-2004 by RabidGoose]



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 01:29 AM
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I would imagine that we left the trees is because there is more food on the ground.
what i was wondering is how close would a star have to be to actually have an effect on our atmosphere and enviroment?
I would imagine it would have to be awful close to have any effect other than a pretty light show.especially if it actually raised our tempature and left dust from its explosion in our oceans 3 million years later.



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 01:37 AM
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"*Edit* Another question. Why would the star dust make thinking evolve from one animal to the next? Would Radiation have taken into play here? Could the radiation from the Super Nova explosion cause a mutation for the better in quite a few creatures starting to walk up right? Especially if the planet was exposed for 300 Thousand years. If we was exposed that long, it could be statistically possible. And I'm not saying I believe this, I'm throwing theories out there before people start looking at me funny."

It would have casued a ton of mutations.only the good ones would end up being passed down as traits.bad mutations tend to die quickly.kinda like rudolph,after they found out his nose was so bright,all the chic reindeer loved him.



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 01:53 AM
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Hah Sam, nice analogy. But most mutations that happen to something typically cause them to be sterile. Especially radiation, doesn't exactly make sperm count for males higher, ya know. But if you really wanted to pan out this theory, I would go with Radiation kick started Free Thinking, maybe?



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 01:56 AM
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I would say it definetly had an effect being we are the sum of our enviroment.
I still find it hard to believe that we had a star that close that was able to affect us to that degree.but im no scientist,i could be totaly wrong.



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 05:56 AM
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Radiation wouldn't be needed to explain changes in thinking patterns. Once out in the open human-beings would come into direct conflict with beasts of prey on a regular basis. This would have forced the relatively frail humans to rely more on innovation and teamwork to survive.



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 08:45 PM
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Amazing find. If the supernova really did bring effects to Earth, imagine what it did to other planets as well. Think Mars for example.



posted on Nov, 7 2004 @ 10:09 PM
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This is very interesting! I hope we hear more of this find. In my opinion though, I think that we started to walk upright more for defensive reasons. With a growing population and only so many trees we needed to start looking else where for food. On the ground our view was no where as good as in the trees so we needed to stand upright to be aware of predators. I belive it would only take a few generations before this would become common place. Overtime our bodies would begin to change to accomadate this posture more comfortably. I really belive that this was a rather quick process. That is the one fascinating aspect of life on earth, it can adapt very quick.



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 06:45 AM
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Originally posted by Ocelot
It's this major climate change that likely caused the hominids to emerge from the trees and begin to walk upright.

Please visit the link provided for the complete story.



WOW Ocelot. Great find. ...About time someone acknowledged that far away, invisible and relatively undetectable cosmic events can 1) change the earth's climate, and thus 2) influence evolution.

Another factor for the adaptive systems analysis program.





posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 07:27 AM
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I had always thought there were a number of reasons for walking upright, including ones already mentioned (the ability to see preds/prey from a further distance is a good one)... I thought the main reason though was a simple one. Regulation of heat in our brain. Back in the ole days of the Sahara Forest/plains, the air temperature was getting warmer, especially near the ground where there was less wind (less air circulation = warmer air = more perspiration that isn't evaporating quickly). Naturally, when the ancients would stand up on their rear legs, they would feel a bit of "draft" so to speak (basically, slightly cooler air temps; their sweat would evaporate more quickly with a draft) which would allow the brains' cooling mechanism's to cool their brains down faster (apparently, this in turn allowed our brain to grow and develop faster).
Anyway, I don't remember all the specific details; it's been too long since I took a basic Anthropology course in college, but that's the gist of it I think.



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 09:19 AM
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Originally posted by Ocelot
. Korschinek can tell that the star explosion occurred at the same time there was a significant climate change in Africa when drier conditions caused the forests to retreat and the savannah to emerge, reports Reuters

I'm sorry but, they are saying that this supernova occured ~3mya,and instantly affected climactic conditions on earth? Seems like no supernova is going to be able to do that, or are they saying it was -very- close to the earth? Imean, there is going to be ahuge delay between the time the explosion occurs and the time that the radiation reaches earth. And enough to affect climate? And dust from that specific supernova has reached earth and settled into the oceans? I wonder if there is some way to determine how long ago those particles were formed?


samhain
Why would the star dust make thinking evolve from one animal to the next? Would Radiation

I don't think that they are saying there is a connection between the arrival of the cosmic debris and the course of human evolution. They are only saying that rays from teh explosion caused a shift in the climate. Light/Radiation would take a long time to reach here, and actual dust (atoms/isotopes from the star) would take an extremely long time to actuall reach earth.



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 09:32 AM
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God is so far implanted in peoples minds, even if you find out how we came to be. most would not believe.

Nice find Ocelot....................


SolidSnake out......................



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 01:25 PM
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Originally posted by SpittinCobra
SolidSnake out

Managing multiple accounts or just refering to the game?

What did that god bit have to do with anything anyway?



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 01:47 PM
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Nygdan, if they found the actual particle of Star Dust in the Earth's Core, then what sense of saying "It would take an extremley long time to reach Earth."

Yes, it would take a long time to reach Earth but they are saying it DID reach Earth. I would agree with you if people were freaking about a Super Nova explosion that just happened now, but it happened long enough ago to have actual particles touch Earth 2.8 million to 3 million years ago.



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 02:00 PM
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How do they conclude:
1. That what they found is stardust
2. That it came from a particular super-nova
3. That it had any life changing effect on climates

Seems like a lot of leaps to me...then again the story isn't really packed with scientific details.



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 02:02 PM
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Originally posted by RabidGoose
but it happened long enough ago to have actual particles touch Earth 2.8 million to 3 million years ago.

I am unclear as to when they are saying it reached earth. They're aren't saying it just reached earth now right? And how far can slow moving dust travel, in less than 3 million years? I know it sounds stupid, but does anyone have anything like information on how fast these things travel, on average? I would think that they tend to slow down pretty quick. Eitherway, they can't have anything to do with what happens here, since they are saying the nova explosion was visible only 3mya.



posted on Nov, 10 2004 @ 02:54 PM
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Well, since they are saying they found evidence of Star Dust in an ocean bed in the Pacific ocean, mainly due to rare Iron 60, I believe. They are saying it's there from what I gathered from the article.



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