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Not Breathing, No Pulse, and Survived.

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posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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Hello ATS. I just wanted to share this story with everyone to get it out of my system. I'm still in a bit of a shock since I witnessed this, so sharing what I saw might help.

My sister and I decided to go to our main pool at our city park today around 2:30pm this afternoon. After driving around the parking lot for 10 minutes looking for a place to park, we finally entered the pool area. Once we set all of our stuff down and got ready to go in, we walked around the pool to the lazy pool section.

As I looked over to one of the blocks where lifeguards stand, I noticed two on their knees over a little girl and my heart jumped. I knew something was wrong right away, but not many other people seemed to notice. The other lifeguards in the area blew their whistles for everyone to exit the pool and more rushed to aid the little girl.

Watching on in awe, I, and many others, noticed she wasn't breathing. One thing that stood out the most at this moment was her father yell her name and dive into the pool to get over to where she was.

I'm not sure how much time passed, but through quick thinking and CPR, the lifeguards were able to get the little girl breathing again. She twitched her legs, they moved her on her side and she started vomiting the water out of her system.

When we saw her move, I could feel a weight being lifted off everyone's shoulders. I could feel everyone's relief, specifically the lifeguards, that they were able to save that little girl.

Once the EMT's came and took the little girl away, I heard a lifeguard whisper to another "She had no pulse." That line will probably stick with me for the rest of my life. She had no pulse. Because of those lifeguards, that little girl was literally brought back to life.

Shortly after the EMT's took the girl to the ambulance (quick response, there's a hospital not 5 minutes away) the pool officials made an announcement that the pool would be closed for 30 minutes while they got everything situated.

My sister and I decided to return to our bags and do a little sunbathing while we took everything in. Most of the people that were there at the time, especially with their kids, took that time to pack their things and leave, deciding it would be better to come back another day.

When we sat down and talked a bit, I happened to look to my right and noticed two men quickly gathered their things to leave. There was a little girl with them who was crying her eyes out and I realised one of them was the girl who nearly drowned's father and the other was a friend/relative. I felt so horrible for them to have to go through all of that when they just wanted to take the girls to the pool for some summer fun.

There was a big part of me that wanted to go over to them and console them, but I knew that the best thing for them was to be left alone to go to her as quickly as they could.


I know this was a long post, but I had to share everything that I experienced today. Watching a little girl die and be brought back to life really put things into perspective for me today and I know I will always remember what I saw today.

Remember, a lifeguards job isn't just hanging out by the pool all summer. Thanks for letting me get this out of my system, ATS. You never know when you'll see something like this happen.




posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 09:15 PM
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Wow... That was a pretty intense experience. Moments like that make you realize how precious life is. Most of the time we take our lives and the lives around us for granted. I've been around similar things and you can definitely feel the pain and intense emotion of others if you are an empathetic person.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 09:28 PM
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Originally posted by undefyned
Wow... That was a pretty intense experience. Moments like that make you realize how precious life is. Most of the time we take our lives and the lives around us for granted. I've been around similar things and you can definitely feel the pain and intense emotion of others if you are an empathetic person.


For sure. I know there are a lot of people out there who don't think anything will ever happen to them and the exact opposite is true. You never know when an accident can or will happen. It could happen to you, your kids, your neighbors kids, or someone you know.

A lot of teens nowadays also think being a lifeguard is glamorous. Being near girls or guys in their swimsuits, hanging in the sun near the pool all summer. But there is a lot those kids don't realise. Being a lifeguard isn't glamorous at all. There are a lot of people in the pool who's lives are in your hands, and people don't seem to realise that. Hopefully, those who were there today and watched on with my sister and I will see just what it takes to be a lifeguard and pass it on.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 10:11 PM
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Being taught to swim when I was 5 years old is about the only good thing I can say about my education. At 5 years old we all got swimming lessons twice per week until we could ALL swim.
In my nearly 60 years on this planet I have twice found myself in the water, and would have drowned had I not been taught to swim.

OP. You're correct that being a life guard is not all glamour. I've watched them pull stinking decaying bodies from the sea.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 

Good read,when I was 5,I was a aeroplaned into the lake by the ankles.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 10:26 PM
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reply to post by VoidHawk
 


Thing is, from what I heard from other people around us at the time this all happened, I think she did know how to swim. I believe she hit her head at some point and that's what started the whole thing but I can't be sure about it. Like I said in the post, I didn't know anything was wrong until I saw the lifeguards over her. My sister said she saw them pull her out, but I don't think anyone really saw what happened up until then.

Anyways, I'm glad that you agree as well that being a lifeguard isn't a glamorous job.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 10:35 PM
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I'm glad they got the kid back. It would have been a tragedy if they didn't succeed.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 10:46 PM
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Originally posted by SarnholeOntarable
reply to post by VoidHawk
 

Good read,when I was 5,I was a aeroplaned into the lake by the ankles.


That reminds me of when myself and 2 others....helped....a friend into the lake, only to discover he couldn't swim

Like a fool I jumped in to help him. As soon as I got close to him he scrambled onto me, pushing me down, very frightening!!
I've had a lot of respect for water since then.

Rule one. Don't go near someone who's drowning unless you can approach from behind. They are panicking and will drown you! Wait until they are too tired to put you at risk before you approach them.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


You and me both. My sister, myself, and probably many others were nearly in tears thinking she was dead. I mean, technically she was until they brought her back, but still.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 11:47 PM
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Originally posted by VoidHawk

Originally posted by SarnholeOntarable
reply to post by VoidHawk
 

Good read,when I was 5,I was a aeroplaned into the lake by the ankles.

Rule one. Don't go near someone who's drowning unless you can approach from behind. They are panicking and will drown you! Wait until they are too tired to put you at risk before you approach them.


It's sad how true this is. I've had a similar thing happen to me before, too. It's amazing to me, though, that they think that getting on top of you will help the situation and magically make both of you float.



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