Russia to send nuclear submarines to southern seas

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posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:17 PM
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Russia to send nuclear submarines to southern seas


Russia plans to resume nuclear submarine patrols in the southern seas after a hiatus of more than 20 years following the break-up of the Soviet Union, Itar-Tass news agency reported on Saturday, in another example of efforts to revive Moscow's military.

The plan to send Borei-class submarines, designed to carry 16 long-range nuclear missiles, to the southern hemisphere follows President Vladimir Putin's decision in March to deploy a naval unit in the Mediterranean Sea on a permanent basis starting this year.


www.reuters.com...


Well this is certainly a game changer and makes the situation in Syria a lot more serious. Witnessing the rebirth of the cold war? (or perhaps it never stopped) It is apparent that to Russia, that Syria is the line in the sand. Invade and you take the serious risk of waking the bear.
edit on 1-6-2013 by MidnightTide because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:00 PM
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I believe you are correct, the unnecessary wars in the East are going to either go full out or stop shortly, Russia is not to be mistaken when they say enough they mean enough.

This makes me think of the Georgian conflict where they owned the air and the ground in less than 1 day after that conflict began.



To the power brokers in the world please take note, to the people in the world say no to a draft, because your going to die for the Elite and not your beliefs.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:21 PM
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I dont believe they ever left the southern seas.......and if they did they certainly wouldnt announce their return to the rest of the world.......russia has subs all over, the us and other countries have subs all over.....



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:41 PM
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It's going to be awhile before they are able to start these patrols if they're going to use the Borei. They currently have 3 completed, with only one actively in service, and only one more currently under construction.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:51 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
It's going to be awhile before they are able to start these patrols if they're going to use the Borei. They currently have 3 completed, with only one actively in service, and only one more currently under construction.


Would not one in service with that many missiles not do the trick?

Plus lets not forget their other assets as old as they might be they are capable of major destruction and mayhem no?

I am asking because you post some really factual stats regarding weaponry so don't take my post wrong.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:53 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Not if they're planning on 24/7/365 patrols. They need at least most of the entire 10 they plan on adding to the fleet.

As for their older boats, one of the reasons they stopped patrols was because their older boats were prone to breakdowns, and they weren't able to run 24/7 patrols with them. They would average a month or more without a boat on patrol because all their boats were down for maintenance.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:57 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Thanks for the info!

I still believe that Russia won't let Syria go without serious consequences.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:58 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by Iwinder
 


Not if they're planning on 24/7/365 patrols. They need at least most of the entire 10 they plan on adding to the fleet.

As for their older boats, one of the reasons they stopped patrols was because their older boats were prone to breakdowns, and they weren't able to run 24/7 patrols with them. They would average a month or more without a boat on patrol because all their boats were down for maintenance.


Thanks for that information, so how long could their one new boat patrol for?
Could not some of their older boats fill in the gaps for small amounts of time?
Plus their actual surface fleet seems to be in better shape and I do believe they are active in the area?

Correct me where you deem fit and please add any info you can if you like.

Thanks for your quick response.
Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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You have to be brave to get on those Russian boats. They do not have the best safety record. Also subs with nukes like this are strategic assets and would have nothing to do with Syria. Considering Russias growing ties with Israel I would be suprised to see Israel become a regular port for Russian ships after Assad falls. Not these boomers of course but, other ships. It is an interesting turn where the Arab league is at odds with Russia all the time now and on the same side as the West. Mean while Russia and Israel have become growing buddies because the Russians need the tech and Putin admires them. Strange world we live in.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by Iwinder
 


Nuclear boats are only limited by food, and any maintenance problems that crop up that they can't fix on their own. If I'm remembering correctly US SSBNs stay out about 60-80 days. The Borei, as long as they can maintain it properly would be about the same.

As for the older boats, as long as they were able to get them up to a higher standard than they were in the past, there's no reason they couldn't patrol a few weeks while the Borei went in for refit, but I would still want to have at least three Borei in service minimum before I started patrols. Then you could rotate them instead of bringing the older boats out that far. If I had five or six, I'd be much more comfortable.

In 2008, the 14 Ohio class boats performed 31 patrols. That's an average of just over two patrols per boat for the year. That would give you an idea of why only a small handful of boats would be so difficult to maintain on 24/7/365 patrols.
edit on 6/1/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 09:53 AM
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Lets not lose the announcements intent among the facts of the limited supply of ships that russia possesses.....
I think its really a matter of propaganda.....they have no means of really doing this now.....
maybe later but not this year.(well, maybe one boat)
this is just rhetoric.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 04:15 PM
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Russia Is Upping The Ante By Sending Its Only Aircraft Carrier To The Mediterranean

www.businessinsider.com...



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 06:01 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by Iwinder
 


Nuclear boats are only limited by food, and any maintenance problems that crop up that they can't fix on their own. If I'm remembering correctly US SSBNs stay out about 60-80 days. The Borei, as long as they can maintain it properly would be about the same.

As for the older boats, as long as they were able to get them up to a higher standard than they were in the past, there's no reason they couldn't patrol a few weeks while the Borei went in for refit, but I would still want to have at least three Borei in service minimum before I started patrols. Then you could rotate them instead of bringing the older boats out that far. If I had five or six, I'd be much more comfortable.

In 2008, the 14 Ohio class boats performed 31 patrols. That's an average of just over two patrols per boat for the year. That would give you an idea of why only a small handful of boats would be so difficult to maintain on 24/7/365 patrols.
edit on 6/1/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)


Your information is much appreciated and understood.......thanks very much for informing a land lubber and probably many more than just me.

So in a nut shell you are saying all subs no matter the type are extremely high in the maintenance department.
I learn a lot here on ATS and that is why I am here on a regular basis.

Regards, Iwinder



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 02:18 AM
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Originally posted by Iwinder

So in a nut shell you are saying all subs no matter the type are extremely high in the maintenance department.
I learn a lot here on ATS and that is why I am here on a regular basis.

Regards, Iwinder


I've known several people that served on boats during their time in the navy, and they pretty much all had a "we're all gonna die" story of something failing that had everyone thinking they were going to die because of it. The ocean is an unforgiving bitch who will kill you if you make a mistake on something that seems minor.

I first read about some insane hull flexing on WWII submarines, that I was later told still happens to this day. If you were to take a string, and cut it to just long enough to stretch across a sub control room when they're on the surface, by the time they reach their patrol depth, the string will drop 3+ inches in the middle because the hull compresses so far due to pressure. That tends to take its toll on a boat, and eventually things start to break.



posted on Jun, 5 2013 @ 05:24 PM
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Russia is starting back up these patrols.
Did we the USA stop patrolling around other country's?
This is my question as i do not know.



posted on Jun, 5 2013 @ 05:41 PM
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reply to post by grayghost
 


US patrols have continued. They haven't been sneaking into Russian harbors like they did in the 60s and early 70s, but they've continued to patrol near where their boats come out of the ports, and they've shadowed them, etc.





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