I'm In Turkey: "Turkish Spring" Starting?

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posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 05:17 AM
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reply to post by azureskys
 


Yes I grasp the OPs situation. They will arrest a lot of people and then they will release a lot of people. That is what tends to happen at mass demonstrations. They do not have the capacity to deal with them all.

and yes get involved.. The occupy protests are transnational in nature... These issues are not about a single country they are a worldwide phenomena..

Certainly it would be more interesting and useful than sitting on the beach sipping a drink through a straw..

Just stay safe and peaceful and you will probably be fine. Live a little..!




posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 05:43 AM
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There is always going stuff going on in Turkey. Just got with the flow and don't think too much of it. I'm currently living in Adana and its hot as a oven right now.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:05 AM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


I disagree.

Wisdom is life giving and life preserving.

Foolhardiness is hazardous to health and life . . . FOR NO GOOD AND LASTING PURPOSE.

I have lived in and through such situations in foreign lands.

I can't imagine a local . . . authority . . . being the least bit impressed and kindly disposed toward such foreign cheekiness.

The typical perspective is that foreigners are being quite ARROGANT to presume to know enough solid facts from which to choose what side to be on.

And even where that choice seems clear . . . it's still presumptive of foreigners to insert themselves in the battle as though the foreigners are some sort of white knights riding in to save the day and 'the local serfs.'

It has to be at least a 55-95% chance that the foreigners will be caught up in events that they brazenly insert themselves into in the midst of such chaos--IN A WAY THAT--will result in their being

A) at least identified as a probable foreign "agent."
B) quite possibly injured
C) quite possibly imprisoned for an indefinite period without anything even resembling American rights of the accused.

To what end? To no good and lasting end. The effect of foreigner participants in such chaos cannot decide the issues. Their numbers are too small and the attitude of the authorities toward their involvement can almost only be negative.

In this case, the OP is leading TOURISTS.

His FIRST AND PRIMARY RESPONSIBILITY IS TO THE SAFETY OF HIS TOURIST CHARGES.

There's no way he can properly tend to that primary responsibility AND engage in the protests.

Besides, it's quite easy for "Monday morning quarter-backers" from a distance--to pontificate on what the leader of helpless tourists should do in foreign chaos.

.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:08 AM
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Sorry but I don't understand one thing, what are protesting over? They want a more secular Turkey or a more Islamic one? Or are they protesting over some trees?
Hoping someone can fill me in )



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:18 AM
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Originally posted by asen_y2k
Sorry but I don't understand one thing, what are protesting over? They want a more secular Turkey or a more Islamic one? Or are they protesting over some trees?
Hoping someone can fill me in )


It started with a protest against a shopping mall development. Now it appears to have been hijacked by a bunch of other people.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:20 AM
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reply to post by Sankari
 


Yes but what is their aim. What do they want to achieve with mass protest, I don't understand. Have they mentioned their demands?
edit on 1/6/13 by asen_y2k because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:26 AM
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Originally posted by asen_y2k
reply to post by Sankari
 


Yes but what is their aim. What do they want to achieve with mass protest, I don't understand. Have they mentioned their demands?
edit on 1/6/13 by asen_y2k because: (no reason given)


It's all rather confused. They're making vague noises about corruption and stuff. No clear message as far as I can see.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:30 AM
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Thank you everyone for your comments, links, etc.

We are sequestered in our hotel tonight as protests in Ismir continue. Spotty Internet as authorities jam the signal. May not continue to Istanbul if things don't settle down.....

I never get the easy trips!



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:34 AM
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reply to post by asen_y2k
 


If you refer back to this post www.abovetopsecret.com... about a
1/4 of the way down, you will find info on the back ground of what the real issues are, not just a park.
The park issue seems to be "The straw that broke the camels back" so-to-speak.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:37 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 



Maybe you are correct. Maybe its best they sit in their hotel rooms and submerge themselves in a false reality. Carry on regardless like nothing is happening in the real world. Regardless of nationality something is happening in Turkey and not just Turkey. It is transnational in nature. People are people the world over.

I guess maybe I am arrogant too then because I know which side I would be on. The problem is not just endemic to Turkey it can be seen in many countries. People should have the right to peaceful assembly regardless of what they are protesting for. They have the right not to have tear gas canisters fired at them by an arrogant authority. They have the right not to beaten with batons and they have the right not to be killed. Until governments listen to the will of the people these kind of things will continue to happen.

Personally I would have no problem going out in solidarity with the people and bearing witness to the fact that something is wrong. At the end of the day the the descision lies the OP. I was just offering my two pence..



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:43 AM
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reply to post by MRuss
 


I'me excited you are in Turkey and can report to ATS what's happening first hand but do stay safe!

Me personally, I will never be visiting any Middle Eastern nation in this lifetime.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:54 AM
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Originally posted by purplemer
reply to post by BO XIAN
 



Maybe you are correct. Maybe its best they sit in their hotel rooms and submerge themselves in a false reality. Carry on regardless like nothing is happening in the real world. Regardless of nationality something is happening in Turkey and not just Turkey. It is transnational in nature. People are people the world over.


It is extremely foolish for tourists to get involved with dangerous public protests in a foreign country, especially when they cannot speak the local language and the police are known to be violent.

If I was a tourist in Istanbul right now, I'd contact my embassy for advice and act on it. I'd make sure I was in a safe place and sit tight until I knew what was going on. Then I'd start looking for the first flight out of Turkey.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:58 AM
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reply to post by purplemer
 


Having a theoretical right or even real right . . .

and

exercising that right foolishly . . .

can be 2 different things.

What lasting benefit comes from standing overtly and dangerously in solidarity with locals in such a situation?

There's a time to step-back and pray . . . maybe quietly cheer the locals on--but stay out of it overtly. It complicates things far too much in an already chaotic situation.

my 2 cents.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:00 AM
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Just an update this morning. This just came across as a headline on Breaking News a few minutes ago...


ISTANBUL — Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan of Turkey called for an immediate end on Saturday to the fiercest anti-government demonstrations in years, as protesters clashed with riot police in Istanbul for a second day.


It sounds rough over there....but for this?


Mr. Erdogan vowed to push ahead with the redevelopment of a park in Istanbul’s Taksim Square, the city’s equivalent of Cairo’s Tahrir Square, with a replica Ottoman-era army barracks that would house a shopping mall.

Police fired tear-gas and water cannon to prevent crowds of protesters chanting “unite against fascism” and “government resign” from reaching Taksim, where hundreds were injured in clashes on Friday.

Source

Surely there is a lot more to it. I'm guessing the focus on development in this square is to divert attention from deeper issues behind the anger? I was under the impression this wasn't just one city with protest right now, anyway.

edit on 1-6-2013 by Wrabbit2000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:03 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


I see you're a fan of BreakingNews.com as well?


Well, of course Turkey's PM wants the protests to stop but these people are angry for a reason. I'm not afraid of the protesters, I'm afraid of the Al Qaeda terrorists who are in Turkey right now.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:05 AM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
Surely there is a lot more to it. I'm guessing the focus on development in this square is to divert attention from deeper issues behind the anger?


The development in this square is what started these protests in the first place. It was the protesters who focused on this development. Now they've been joined by other people with complaints of their own:


The range of protesters was noted as being broad, encompassing both right- and leftwingers as well as Turks and Kurds.

Protesters' complaints ranged from the original local environmental concerns to such issues as curbs on alcohol, rows about kissing in public, and the war in Syria.

Istanbul mayor Kadir Topbas stated that the environmental campaign had been manipulated by "political agendas."


(Source).


I was under the impression this wasn't just one city with protest right now, anyway.



Some of the protesters have styled themselves as #OccupyGezi. Protesters took to the Taksim Square of Istanbul and streets in Ankara as well as Bursa, Eskişehir, İzmir, Mersin, Adana, İzmit, Konya, Samsun and Bodrum.


(Source).



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:43 AM
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Seriously PurpleMer?

You think I am going to take 21 people whom my job is to protect and inform while traveling and tell them to take to the streets?

With tear gas and water cannons going off everywhere?

Truly?

Do you realize what sort of trouble one would be in in Turkey to get involved in the politics of this country? Have you ever heard of what life is like in a Turkish prison?

Every guide in the world tells tourists not to talk politics in Turkey. It is foolish.

We are here to see ancient ruins.

Let me do my job. I check idealism at the door when I am on tour.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:45 AM
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The protestors are merely using the park as a way to air many years of grievances, for those who are wondering.

2nd line



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:50 AM
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Right now from my window there is loud protesting near the waterfront in Izmir----they are chanting something in unison. I can hear it from blocks away. Of course, they are speaking Turkish, so I have no idea what they are saying.

Clapping and cheering.

It sounds like there are thousands of people at the protest. Sirens. Horns honking. I pray for the protestors that they stay safe.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by MRuss
 


Stay safe! I hope the internet doesn't go down there!

Thanks for being an eye in Turkey, just be careful and keep a low profile!


Just posting on the internet from there would make me nervous, I would get out as quick as I could.
But then I tend to be a little overly paranoid when I know things could blow up in a hurry and leave whatever area I am in. Never been in that kind of situation though.

Just be careful and low profile.
Americans tend to get targeted by radicals.
edit on 1-6-2013 by Darkblade71 because: (no reason given)





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