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Now required to ask patients of suicidal thoughts??

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posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 03:15 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 

I know nothing about the care or even access to care for that lot you named and neither do you. It is this little thing called HIPAA....

Now that we got that out of the way those questions are asked for a legitimate reason whether you like it or not. Not once has anyone balked at me for asking.




posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:05 PM
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Originally posted by cry93
reply to post by Honor93
 

I know nothing about the care or even access to care for that lot you named and neither do you. It is this little thing called HIPAA....

Now that we got that out of the way those questions are asked for a legitimate reason whether you like it or not. Not once has anyone balked at me for asking.

ha, actually i do, if only you knew, but clearly, you never will.
(TBI patient [traumatic brain injury] twice over - try again)

oh and btw HIPAA - which didn't exist before 1996 ... is irrelevant to this discussion.

IF HIPAA standards were being followed, the healthcare personnel would not be encouraged or permitted to Report their findings to legislators, politicians or any other party ... so says the HIPAA laws to which you referred


yes, there is a legitimate reason, it's called LABELing and you would be the cog that enables the machine to carry on with its malfeasance.

i do hope you are proud of your labeling ability ... perhaps you could teach Monsanto the importance of such a practice



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 06:21 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


Quit. Just quit it. You did not treat none of the people you are babbling about here. You most likely do not even know them but if you do you failed them. You also do not who I am nor my profession so knock it off there, too. I know plenty concerning TBI so stop throwing it around like it is your trump card.


Btw, many things have change since '96, especially in a health care setting.
edit on 1-6-2013 by cry93 because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 07:04 PM
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Originally posted by cry93
reply to post by Honor93
 


Quit. Just quit it.

'nuff said.

when you gain some experience, perhaps then we'll talk, until then, keep studying ... you have much to learn.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 09:11 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


HIPPA law is universal . You can lose you license and incur HUGE FINES for not following HIPAA .
This *can* and should absolutely be enforced in this instance. Thing is,the public is unaware of their rights apparently .

Just because your psych info isnt being published in tabloids,doesn't mean this isn't completely illegal ,and our govt is getting away with it.
It's no different than the IRS scandal . What's good for the goose,is suddenly not good for the gander .

Wait and see. They will do it to the wrong person ,who will go public with it ,and all the poopie will hit the fan .
Unless you sign something that say, I hereby give this facility ,and all healthworkers therein,permission to share my information with the federal government ,THIS IS ILLEGAL .

www.hhs.gov...
edit on 05/28/2013 by PtolemyII because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 09:22 PM
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reply to post by Asktheanimals
 



THROWS HANDS IN THE AIR
I LOVE YOU !!!

I cannot tell you the bashing I take on other forums for this !
*hugs*

At last ,I have found a forum that has......sanity !

*throws confetti*



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 09:33 PM
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reply to post by PtolemyII
 


HIPPA law is universal
do you mean HIPAA ??
or is there some other law you're referencing ?

the public is usually unaware of their rights, that's why so many of the 'public' are deemed criminals without committing any crime.

i agree that the HIPAA standards are being discarded or dismissed for the 'benefit of all' ... or so we're told.

personally, i hope Sebelius and the entirety of HHS is held to the standards that THEY created.
but, we all have our fantasies, don't we ?

i hope the poopie lands on their heads and can't be washed away.

ps, although our psyche info isn't published yet, it soon will be ... case-studies and all, just you wait and see.

the excuse then will be ... but, we didn't publish your name, just your number(s).


i often wondered how Health Info PORTABILITY evolved into Health Info Privacy anyway

did ppl really think their 'privacy' was being protected back then or anytime since ???

i've often thought that's exactly why so many 'trash instances' went unchallenged or were barely news-worthy ... after all, finding your medical records in a public trash dump could be deemed 'portability', right ????

if anyone thinks their Health Info is private to anyone beyond themselves, they are already delusional and potentially suicidal once they realize their privacy is non-existant.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 09:44 PM
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reply to post by cry93
 


You did not treat none of the people you are babbling about here.
do tell, from the view way up there upon your high horse, could you at least point out where i ever said i did ???
please



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 09:57 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


Not published yet ...well ,if Tom Cruise can own a hospital for them calling the tabloids be ause he was admitted there ,I dare say there's a lawyer somewhere ,who will sue any MD or institution who does the same to you .
The plan is to get attending MDs to agree to sign off and give out your info .
That's professional suicide.
They cannot claim granny is a terrorist because she's depressed since grandpa died ,and publish it .
A huge portion of true suicides today,are our elderly ,and not a single medical institution took an iterest in that ,and now if you're depressed because your husband was killed in Iraq ,you're a security threat .
This is huge bull**** . I can smell it from here it stinks so bad .

If they did it to me,trust me,you would read about what I did back to them ,in the papers,and how big my settlment was.
Not everyone is a sheep .



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 10:32 PM
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Originally posted by opethPA
For as long as I can remember they have asked that in the ER's around Philadelphia and New Jersey.

Maybe it is some Govt led IllumniatiHAARPCIA op to remove guns.
Just as easy for it to be a clinician trying to triage and get all the facts about a scenario.

I go into an ER, ouch my wrist hurts. The clinician asks have you ever had suicidal thoughts, "Yes I actually was trying to hang myself and the rope broke and i fell on my wrist"

The mere act of asking if you have suicidal thoughts, in an ER\ACC\SPEC CARE center does not scream anything to me other than information gathering to assess a situation.



Seriously? You really believe it's appropriate for medical personnel to interrogate someone who came to them with wrist pain?

Some people are really drinking the kool aid, I guess.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 10:40 PM
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What about drugs that can cause suicidal feelings. Say you're on lithium ,or tamiflu ,or abilify ,and you have these feelings that are your primary physicians doing ?
And you say yes I'm suicidal ,and he documents this,but then notifies the government ,instead of taking you off said med,with documented side affect,and now you have a record with homeland security .
The feelings may go away when the person is off the med . Right ?
This is far from black and white.

Unless you go to the hospital because you feel you are a danger to yourself or others ,this issue has a huge amt of semantics .
Wait for the first lawsuits. Same with Obama care.

Courts will be filled with suits from his fallout,long after he's out or office .
Just my two cents .
edit on 05/28/2013 by PtolemyII because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 10:53 PM
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Originally posted by wildtimes


It's to keep people from offing themselves or other people. It's NOT "thought police" or some conspiracy to take your rights away...


1. Why should people be kept from offing themselves if that's what they want to do? This is a self-ownership issue. I am not state property. I am an individual.

2. If someone is trying to off other people, I think that's going to be obvious, don't you?

3. It is a thought police type of scenario. You're just in denial about it. People have a right to their thoughts and people have a right to not be interrogated by paid informers when they have gone to see a doctor about a completely innocent problem.

4. If it is not a conspiracy, I don't know what it is. How can something like this happen all over the place without a bunch of people conspiring to do it?

5. Unfortunately, there isn't a specific right listed in the BOR (that I know of) that says state employees cannot ask you anything they want. But there should be. I just kind of doubt the founders could have possibly envisioned the creepy medical environments that exist today (and their relationship with the government) in 1776.
edit on 1-6-2013 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)

edit on 1-6-2013 by BrianFlanders because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:08 PM
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reply to post by BrianFlanders
 


1. Why should people be kept from offing themselves if that's what they want to do?

In my opinion, they should not be kept from it.

This is a self-ownership issue. I am not state property. I am an individual.
I agree.


2. If someone is trying to off other people, I think that's going to be obvious, don't you?
No. Not necessarily.


3. It is a thought police type of scenario. You're just in denial about it.

No, I'm not. I've had several friends suicide. I understood every one of their motives. I've also had 'suicidal' boyfriends.....
perhaps you are unaware of how much it hurts EVERYONE ELSE when a person does that.


People have a right to their thoughts and people have a right to not be interrogated by paid informers when they have gone to see a doctor about a completely innocent problem.

They ALSO have the right to NOT ANSWER THE QUESTION!

For crying out loud!! Okay, I'm done here.
Never mind.
edit on 1-6-2013 by wildtimes because: I give up.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:10 PM
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reply to post by PtolemyII
 

well, that's a story of which i'm not familiar but maybe there is hope in that lawyer pool somewhere ... i've only ever encountered sharks


while this is true ...

They cannot claim granny is a terrorist because she's depressed since grandpa died ,and publish it
they certainly can publish all the intimate details of "Patient X" for the world to review.

i am personal friends with several people who are a "patient X", so i'm quite familiar with their cases, whether they told me or not.
yes it stinks, but who is wielding the pooper scooper ??



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:17 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


And I'm a medical professional . If I even call a patient at home ,I cannot leave a message detailing ANY of their history,lest someone besides the patient hears said voice message ,unless I want a 3000$ fine and possible restrictions on my license .
HIPAA is a,shadow no medical professional wants hanging over them .

Anyone publishing any patient info ,even replacing it with patient x ,can be sued if said patient didn't give permission . If the issue is pushed by the violated patient ,said professional can be fined and or lose their license .
PS People writing a college thesis on certain patients,or a study ,all the patients habe signed waivers,ergo ,they can be patient x,but they've given permission ,even if they didn't read the small print.


edit on 05/28/2013 by PtolemyII because: (no reason given)

edit on 05/28/2013 by PtolemyII because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:19 PM
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reply to post by BrianFlanders
 

i take issue with #2 and James Holmes is a glaring example of why.

2. If someone is trying to off other people, I think that's going to be obvious, don't you?
apparently, even when they are, the "professionals" seem to be either oblivious or hog-tied to DO much of anything, wouldn't you agree ?

so realistically, how would this maneuver (question everyone) change that ?

as for the rest, i agree except #5 ... the 4th Amendment does cover such issues, specifically.

fishing expeditions are for fishermen, not doctors, nurses or politicians unless they have a pole and bait on the shoreline



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:26 PM
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reply to post by wildtimes
 


They ALSO have the right to NOT ANSWER THE QUESTION
actually, they don't.
try it sometime and see for yourself just how quickly you're relegated to 'suicide watch'.

and therein lies the Other problem ... following your therapist's advice can get you in more trouble than when you arrived with 'wrist pain'.
edit on 1-6-2013 by Honor93 because: typo



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:29 PM
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You'd be amazed at the specialized instruments there are available in emergency rooms to remove unusually shaped objects from.... well, you get the drift.

I've seen some mighty strange xrays. If you can imagine it, and even if you can't, someone has managed to shove it.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:31 PM
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reply to post by PtolemyII
 

i don't dispute the 'giving permission' statement but how many unconscious patients have a clue ?

and, let's not forget that many 'patient x' publishings originated from parental permission ... what happens when 'patient x' comes of age and decides their privacy has been violated ??

it's not like their case would or could be UN-published, is it ?



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 11:46 PM
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reply to post by Honor93
 


With an unconscious patient ,its known as implied consent .
Any and all emergency room procedures require consent .
If a patient is not in a condition to give this consent ,it goes under implied ,especially if said patient is in danger of dying.
Pediatric patients,unless they are dying,permission from a guardian must be given,even if not on the scene .

If unconscious patients had to give consent ,many people would die.

In this case,being a grey area,I'm not sure what the HIPAA law is,if said patient dies,and there is no next of kin to give or deny consent .
I guess they could publish that,or send it to an agency ,but its a grey area.

If an unconscious patient comes in,and is saved ,they then have the right to say they do not want any personal info published,in any way .
edit on 05/28/2013 by PtolemyII because: (no reason given)



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