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First Image EVER of the Hydrogen Atom!

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posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:03 PM
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Originally posted by vind21
They hydrogen atom is probably the only image they will release. I doubt we will be seeing any of the higher count atoms unless the images wont hurt the perception of accepted science it was pretty brave of them to show an image, rendered or otherwise, of the actual wave function even if it is only 2d.
And what if the images help accepted science, like these?

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Originally posted by pteridine
Chemistry textbooks typically include illustrations of atoms, but with caveats. The drawings depict atomic nuclei surrounded by electron orbitals—fuzzy spheres, barbells, tripods, and so on—but those figures represent the probability of finding an electron at a certain place around the nucleus rather than an actual “shape.” Researchers have now managed to image the electron orbitals and show for the first time that, in a sense, atoms really look like those textbook images.

www.scientificamerican.com...

An interesting technological advance. This takes field-emission microscopy a step further and, using a clever technique, shows the shapes of electron clouds around individual atoms.


Originally posted by VitalOverdose
reply to post by Nathwa
 
Well it proves that the maths we have been using to simulate atoms and the theories we have come up with about the way they work are correct. It means we are on the right track to understanding how the universe works.




We are indeed clever little monkeys
There's a reason accepted science is accepted....it's usually because of supporting evidence.

I'm not sure any of these imaging techniques are really "direct" including the one in the OP, since it's a composite of many observations and not one atom, but they are still very impressive images.




posted on May, 28 2013 @ 10:02 PM
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Originally posted by Tlexlapoca
Hmph..... not impressed


Its about time scientist actually did something for a change
edit on 28-5-2013 by Tlexlapoca because: (no reason given)


Science discovers , there is no change in science.

There are just some constructions based on the knowledge.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 11:00 PM
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It appears to be sort of smiling and has a red nose. I'll take a little of what Atom has been drinking.



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 12:13 AM
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This is sort of what I've been waiting for.

The hydrogen image looks a lot like what I drew of what an oxygen atom might look like.

Like the two layers of skins around the inside sphere. Well in my hypothetical model, one of those skins is a boson, which isn't quite a particle but it becomes one when something is in it. Except in the oxygen drawing at my house, there were 8 little spheres inside the two layers.

They are really like frogs eggs. Except notice the two dark "fish" shapes in the hydrogen model. One goes one way, the other goes the other way. I never expected two of them in a hydrogen model; I thought it was one "fish" shape per little sphere, which is the electron. Those fish shapes, they might be trapped micro black holes. Don't they look like a yin yang symbol?

Hydrogen is unique because of it's one-ness. I hope they get other pictures of other elements soon. I really want to compare my sketches of oxygen with their pictures.

Well now it's a matter of time before, like science has learned to modify human egg cells to make people, they can modify atoms by getting past that boson, or whatever it is, barrier and adding electrons, taking them out, making superatoms or something.



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 02:12 AM
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reply to post by luciddream
 



How the heck did they get the orbital? it does not exist as a circular line...

It seems that alfa1 answered your question: "The group observed several hundreds of thousands of ionization events to obtain the result".

However, when we are not observing the electron is does exist as a "standing wave" around the proton. A wave doesn't have to exist in one single place like a classical particle, and the electron is a particle-wave after all.

I was a bit confused at first when I saw the picture, because there's no way to actually observe the electron without collapsing the wave function. But using many ionization events to plot out the standing wave is possible.
edit on 29/5/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 02:26 AM
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Simply Amazing. I cannot wait to see more pictures of the quantum universe.



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 03:05 AM
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Originally posted by luciddream
im skeptical.... i think it is hydrogen atom but a false image....

How the heck did they get the orbital? it does not exist as a circular line...


It just looks that way because it is a 2D image.



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 06:04 AM
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reply to post by vind21
 


Thanks for the great pic vind21. It brings back memories of 40 or so years ago when I was lucky enough to see gold atoms using (I wasn't using, just in the room observing) an electron microscope. Wouldn't be much these days but for me back then, being able to be at a facility with an electron microscope was an exciting experience. (one that not many people would have experienced)
so now to be able to see your pic is great. Thanks again for stirring the memories of times before personal computers and mobile phones



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 12:52 PM
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reply to post by vind21
 


The study is apparently very good since it was accepted into a high impact peer reviewed journal. thanks for posting



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 03:31 PM
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Originally posted by XaniMatriX
Next thing they will see is a galaxy.


I've believed that since I was 11 years old. It just made sense to me.

If that's true, then I guess we're in the middle of a fluorine atom. Boring.

What's interesting though is that supposedly, the electrons are spinning at an incredibly fast rate of speed. That would mean that time flows much, much faster at the atomic level.
edit on 5/29/2013 by AntiNWO because: I thought I had a coherent thought for a sec



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 03:59 PM
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Originally posted by Tlexlapoca
Hmph..... not impressed


Its about time scientist actually did something for a change
edit on 28-5-2013 by Tlexlapoca because: (no reason given)


The previous times they tried to get such a picture, all they would have is a fuzzy sphere. This gives you an idea of where all the energy levels are:

en.wikipedia.org...

upload.wikimedia.org...



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 04:01 PM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by vind21
They hydrogen atom is probably the only image they will release. I doubt we will be seeing any of the higher count atoms unless the images wont hurt the perception of accepted science it was pretty brave of them to show an image, rendered or otherwise, of the actual wave function even if it is only 2d.
And what if the images help accepted science, like these?

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Originally posted by pteridine
Chemistry textbooks typically include illustrations of atoms, but with caveats. The drawings depict atomic nuclei surrounded by electron orbitals—fuzzy spheres, barbells, tripods, and so on—but those figures represent the probability of finding an electron at a certain place around the nucleus rather than an actual “shape.” Researchers have now managed to image the electron orbitals and show for the first time that, in a sense, atoms really look like those textbook images.

www.scientificamerican.com...

An interesting technological advance. This takes field-emission microscopy a step further and, using a clever technique, shows the shapes of electron clouds around individual atoms.


Originally posted by VitalOverdose
reply to post by Nathwa
 
Well it proves that the maths we have been using to simulate atoms and the theories we have come up with about the way they work are correct. It means we are on the right track to understanding how the universe works.




We are indeed clever little monkeys
There's a reason accepted science is accepted....it's usually because of supporting evidence.

I'm not sure any of these imaging techniques are really "direct" including the one in the OP, since it's a composite of many observations and not one atom, but they are still very impressive images.



Those pictures correspond to spherical harmonic waveforms:





posted on May, 29 2013 @ 09:54 PM
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This is so awesome. I have been waiting to see something like this. Interesting how it seems to have a ring on the outside and on the inside.



posted on May, 29 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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Originally posted by stormcell

Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by vind21
They hydrogen atom is probably the only image they will release. I doubt we will be seeing any of the higher count atoms unless the images wont hurt the perception of accepted science it was pretty brave of them to show an image, rendered or otherwise, of the actual wave function even if it is only 2d.
And what if the images help accepted science, like these?

www.abovetopsecret.com...

Originally posted by pteridine
Chemistry textbooks typically include illustrations of atoms, but with caveats. The drawings depict atomic nuclei surrounded by electron orbitals—fuzzy spheres, barbells, tripods, and so on—but those figures represent the probability of finding an electron at a certain place around the nucleus rather than an actual “shape.” Researchers have now managed to image the electron orbitals and show for the first time that, in a sense, atoms really look like those textbook images.

www.scientificamerican.com...

An interesting technological advance. This takes field-emission microscopy a step further and, using a clever technique, shows the shapes of electron clouds around individual atoms.


Originally posted by VitalOverdose
reply to post by Nathwa
 
Well it proves that the maths we have been using to simulate atoms and the theories we have come up with about the way they work are correct. It means we are on the right track to understanding how the universe works.




We are indeed clever little monkeys
There's a reason accepted science is accepted....it's usually because of supporting evidence.

I'm not sure any of these imaging techniques are really "direct" including the one in the OP, since it's a composite of many observations and not one atom, but they are still very impressive images.



Those pictures correspond to spherical harmonic waveforms:


I embedded the pic for you...




posted on May, 30 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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Cool if real
Can't wait for the HD image. Maybe in the next 5 year's?



posted on May, 30 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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This new microscope to see smaller than mankind has ever seen was Invented by Dr. Hell of Germany's Max Plank Society (the Nazi mad scientist think tank). He received a European Award over this invention a year or two ago.

Germany's Max Planck Society is now working with......China and now has joint Research Centers with each other.

If Germany and China figure out how atoms hold themselves together......they will become the Joint SuperPowers that will take over Earth.

The Nazi Mad Scientist research center, the Max Planck Society.....it was ENGLAND who disagreed with America and wanted Germany to continue it's mad scientists research center. AMERICA wanted that facility shut down.



posted on May, 30 2013 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by Pervius
 


That's cool. Id rather live under an openly facist/communistic party then a group of jerk offs who pretend they are something else and whisk us all away in the night with straw bags on our heads while telling us how free we are.

The scientific community of the US is trying as hard as it can to make its self irrelevant by refusing to look into anything that is not already understood. As a collective group they would rather wait 40 years to come up with a new way to word the same old research, than actually do any, and show the world how bad they are at actual science. They'd instead prefer to impress you with meaningless math proofs of implausible scenarios then argue over how implausible they are in the most complex and non-descriptive way possible.

Ah, sorry for the rant lol......


Plank has been responsible for most of the really cool/new stuff coming out for the last few years. Without them we'd still be talking about how HLC is being sabotaged from the future.

(Yes they actually setup an investigative board for this very issue
)




The quest to observe the Higgs boson has certainly been plagued by its share of troubles, from the cancellation of the Superconducting Supercollider in 1993 to the Large Hadron Collider's streak of technical troubles. In fact, the projects have suffered such bad luck that Holger Bech Nielsen of the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen and Masao Ninomiya of the Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics in Kyoto wonder if it isn't bad luck at all, but future influences rippling back to sabotage them. In papers like "Test of Effect From Future in Large Hadron Collider: a Proposal" and "Search for Future Influence From LHC," they put forth the notion that observing the Higgs boson would be such an abhorrent event that the future is actually trying to prevent it from happening.


Yeah good thing these guys are leading the way...go science....

edit on 30-5-2013 by vind21 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2013 @ 01:23 PM
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Something doesn't quite make sense to me. As I understand quantum mechanics, the wave function collapses if an observation is made. If we are in fact observing the wave function, shouldn't it collapse and what we should see is a particle instead?

Shouldn't we never, ever be able to actually observe the wave function itself?

edit on 30-5-2013 by IshmaelKipling because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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Amazing to ponder that the red area in the center could actually be a tiny black hole. However, one thing I don't quite understand about the "atoms-are-actually-galaxies" philosophy/theory is how to reconcile the physics we observe at the quantum level with the physics we observe in the cosmos. Why don't celestial objects get entangled, for example? Or do they?



posted on May, 30 2013 @ 01:39 PM
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Here is what I don't understand - and someone please enlighten me so I can if I am way off base.

All things are made up of atoms. Millions and billions and trillions of atoms.

Assuming this to be true, how would any microscope be able to single out one single atom. Would it not also pick up all the atoms around it? The air? The lens? The glass frame? The base? The objects beneath the atom?

If this atom was able to be singled out away from all other existent object, shouldn't this be a greater feat than simply viewing it?



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