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Chinese hackers access major weapons systems

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posted on May, 28 2013 @ 02:56 PM
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This is old news, I remember reading about China's hacking back in Febuary. I'm guessing the full extent is just now coming to light. So what is the US going to do about it? Nothing.




posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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The report did not specify the extent or time of the cyber-thefts or indicate if they involved computer networks of the U.S. government, contractors or subcontractors.


Read folks. No one said they came from the government computers. As I've been standing here saying (and being ignored) contractor computers are more vulnerable, and have probably more information on systems than the government computers do. Lockheed and Boeing have been hacked several times, and have developed better security, but they still use tons of subcontractors that don't have the security that they do.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:19 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


You weren't ignored. I heard you loud and clear, and starred you as well

I think that the problem is that nobody wants to believe our security has been compromised.... It's to scary.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:23 PM
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reply to post by RegisteredUser
 


I guarantee that it has been, but the parts that have the really good stuff, on the government computers, isn't networked on the internet. They can get into some other areas though, such as the Air Force Air Traffic Control system, and possibly some logistics stuff. The designs, and other really classified things aren't networked where a hacker could get into them. Some classified things yes, but anything deep black they'd have to go through the contractors systems.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:28 PM
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reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


Mods may not like this reply, but I have to...

Hahahaha hahahahahahaha AHAHAHAHAHAHAH!! ahahahahahahahahahahahahahaaa!!! aha... ha... hahah... HAHAHAHAHAHAHA.. hahahahahaha!



Edit: also... F yeah China. F yeah.
edit on 28-5-2013 by needlenight because: credits where credits is due



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:47 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I wouldn't be surprised if China did have access to deep black. This has been going on for some time now, and China's response only is to say the US is the real hackers. It's true, US intelligence have been hacking. So aside from having our asses handed to us by China, it's just another day.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 04:01 PM
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reply to post by RegisteredUser
 


I doubt that they have yet, as those are usually SIPRNET or another non-networked computers. A lot of the dark stuff is hand transferred and only on paper. On the government computers those are kept very secure where China won't even get a sniff of them. The F-35 data is bad enough, but the blacker stuff would be really ungood to get out.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 04:05 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by LastStarfighter
 


You're thinking about the original A models of them. The E/F Hornet is as different from the A/B Hornet as the F-15 is from the F-16. Same for the others. They look very similar to the original versions, but if you look at their capabilities and systems, you can't take a tech from a UH-60A, toss him at a UH-60M, and expect him to be able to fix it right off the bat without retraining.




Yes of course. I was saying they have the data on the newest versions. I agree. They will have the same for the next versions as well. Hillary Clinton helped them with their aircraft carrier. Its true.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 04:08 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58

The report did not specify the extent or time of the cyber-thefts or indicate if they involved computer networks of the U.S. government, contractors or subcontractors.


Read folks. No one said they came from the government computers. As I've been standing here saying (and being ignored) contractor computers are more vulnerable, and have probably more information on systems than the government computers do. Lockheed and Boeing have been hacked several times, and have developed better security, but they still use tons of subcontractors that don't have the security that they do.



This goes for all intellectual property in the USA. Most of it is already in use in China in a rip off form.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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reply to post by LastStarfighter
 


There aren't going to be any more versions. The next aircraft that they will get (that anyone could get data on) are the F-35, which has already been compromised repeatedly.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 05:35 PM
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Chinese hackers access major weapons systems..
well couse china owns the US for an big part ( the US depts)...so they are fully entitled to have the so called advanced technology from them
no big deal
example:
who invented the sidewinder principle and who stole it from the inventor... hihi



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 06:11 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by bigcountry08
 


The problem isn't always the government servers, it's the contractors and subcontractors. The main contractor has to email the subcontractor the plans and the updates, and the subcontractors have to email the contractors with their updates, etc. Which means that at some point the plans are on a hackable computer. The primary contractor may have great security, but all it takes is one less than secure subcontractor, and it all gets out.


Email?? WTF? You know there are other ways to transfer data? Especially terabytes.. you don't use 'emails' for that stuff.

They could simply use an external hard drive and carry it themselves to the people that needs it you know. Or in the worst case an highly securised VPN with only one entry and one exit with authenticity certificates.

This story is unbelievable. I'm pretty sure this is not at all what happened.

They must have someone that works from the inside to compromise these kind of things. Or we are being lied to again and nothing happened at all.

You should learn a little more computer security before talking about sending huge blueprints by email.

Peace out.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 06:13 PM
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Originally posted by FraternitasSaturni

WASHINGTON/CANBERRA (Reuters) - Chinese hackers have gained access to designs of more than two dozen major U.S. weapons systems, a U.S. report said on Monday, as Australian media said Chinese hackers had stolen the blueprints for Australia's new spy headquarters.
Citing a report prepared for the Defense Department by the Defense Science Board, the Washington Post said the compromised U.S. designs included those for combat aircraft and ships, as well as missile defenses vital for Europe, Asia and the Gulf.
Among the weapons listed in the report were the advanced Patriot missile system, the Navy's Aegis ballistic missile defense systems, the F/A-18 fighter jet, the V-22 Osprey, the Black Hawk helicopter and the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.


yahoo news

Ok... so... pretty nice from our Chinese friends. What's next? And what could be the consequences of this?

Well at least we'll see the 35 for a reasonable price...


What do you guys think?
edit on Tue May 28 2013 by DontTreadOnMe because: EX tags IMPORTANT: Using Content From Other Websites on ATS


What I'm curious about the most is the part where it says they stole the blueprints for the Australians, does this make sense? Aren't they an ally of ours? Why are they now forming spy agencies and hiring Chinese hackers to steal our blueprints? I can only assume that these are blueprints for advanced technology, not anything we have public like an f-22 but probably things planned for the next generation that are just now in the works. If it was plans of publicly known tech they would have no reason to steal it. Anyway I'm kinda rambling now, but this is curious to say the least.

Ghost



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 06:16 PM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex
Well, they know that we have found their flawed chips that they sold to the DoD and could be trying to figure out what systems are still compromised. It takes quite awhile to replace them all after all.

I’m sure that would be quite the intel coup, just in itself.


They just have to monitor network traffic (they always does) to know if unwanted data or unwanted ports are open in their network.

Its basic networking. Don't you think government have techs with more than 'basic' knowledge? I would bet my life on it.

This story is IMO just a way to make China looks bad. No plans have been stolen at all (at least not real plans like another user said). I bet this was an honey pot and it may have worked


Peace out



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 06:22 PM
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reply to post by bigwig22
 


I get where you're coming from. I used to work for DoD and while many of the IT guys do have the knowledge, many are also just book smart, if you know what I mean.

After every 3 or 4 day weekend, our network was always "F"'ed because they would install patches over the long weekend. And it usually took a week to fix. Talk about job security.
And they got OT to do it as well. Sometimes I think we are our own worst enemy.
edit on 28-5-2013 by TDawgRex because: Sprlling



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 06:23 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by bigcountry08
 


The problem isn't always the government servers, it's the contractors and subcontractors. The main contractor has to email the subcontractor the plans and the updates, and the subcontractors have to email the contractors with their updates, etc. Which means that at some point the plans are on a hackable computer. The primary contractor may have great security, but all it takes is one less than secure subcontractor, and it all gets out.


Another thing, you may be right about the sub-contractors with less secured networks but if this is the case, they would have to hack several of them to get ALL the stuff. Not just one.

Unless the main contractor hands all the plans to the same sub-contractor and that IMO is almost impossible... if this was the case, the sub-contractor would be the main one..

Peace out.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 06:28 PM
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Originally posted by TDawgRex
reply to post by bigwig22
 


I get where you're coming from. I used to work for DoD and while many of the IT guys do have the knowledge, many are also just book smart, if you know what I mean.

After every 3 or 4 day weekend, our network was always "F"'ed because they would install patches over the long weekend. And it usually took a week to fix. Talk about job security.
And they got OT to do it as well. Sometimes I think we are our own worst enemy.
edit on 28-5-2013 by TDawgRex because: Sprlling


Haha! I must agree with you on that. Patches may render the network unstable but these patches are usually programmed by inside people (at the places I have worked). So if there is a failure, nobody from outside knows it and even less knows how to exploit it. I guess OT means outside technicians? Sry but english isnt my first language


A week of fix is quite fast when there is no knowledge of the flaw for outsiders. So, if there has been hacking on this stuff, someone from the inside tip them off. And that, is the main way hackers find their way in on big secured networks. Social engineering is over-powered!

Peace out!
edit on 28-5-2013 by bigwig22 because: typo



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:13 PM
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reply to post by bigwig22
 


It happens all the time. You have a subcontractor that works on an actuator, or just on one part of the aircraft. The main contractor finds a problem with the part they're working on, and since that subcontractor only needs the details for that small part, they simply send an email with the pertinent information about the part they are working on. Anything that goes to the Pentagon or deals with the entire project is hand carried to the Pentagon.

The emails are sent over a secured VPN network, but RSA, which is one of the biggest VPN key suppliers, was hacked and something like 45 million keys were stolen from them, which allowed Lockheed to be hacked. They've since upgraded their security.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:14 PM
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reply to post by TheCrimsonGhost
 


They didn't steal it FOR Australia, they stole the PLANS for the new Australian headquarters building.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:19 PM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by TheCrimsonGhost
 


They didn't steal it FOR Australia, they stole the PLANS for the new Australian headquarters building.


Ah that makes much more sense, the way they worded it with the 2 dozen US plans then a break and then the bit about Australia, I just misread it, thanks for the clarifictation.



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