Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Can The DNA of Plants "Speak" To Humans

page: 1
28
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join
+9 more 
posted on May, 27 2013 @ 09:59 PM
link   

Plant communication. There are several directions one can go with that topic, including plants communicating with each other, the effect of people speaking to plants, the presence of people around them, sound/frequency on plants, and plant intelligence. For this thread I wanted to focus on the aspect of plants speaking to the people, in the sense of communicating a variety of traits such as medicinal, nutrition, visionary or poisonous qualities, and how various cultures have spoken of this when explaining how they knew about certain plants.

Canadian anthropologist Jeremy Narby in his 1999 book, "The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge," spent two years with the Ashaninka Indians in Quirishari, Peru. He examined the medicinal information garnered by shamans who claimed that plants spoke to them and taught them how to develop medicines. He found complicated combinations of plants developed into Indian medicines.

I want to dive right into a more metaphysical angle with some speculation before moving onto the studies and science. This article reveals how shamans knew to combine certain plants for specific effects.


The shaman's extensive knowledge and insistence that it came from the plants themselves gnawed at Narby for years. Eventually, his research led him to examine native religious images. That led to his realization that in many native cultures two snakes intertwined symbolized the "origin of life." This occurs even in Alaska where there are no snakes. Half circles shaped like chromosomes often surrounded the intertwined snake images.

Narby compared the snakes to the spiral-shaped building block of all living things, both plants and animals ... DNA. He eventually surmised that both science and the shamans were talking about the same thing. "I had come to consider that the perspective of biologists could be reconciled with that of the ayahuasqueros and both could be true at the same time," Narby said.
He wrote that he believed that a plant had a spirit, a consciousness, an essence. Its DNA had a particular electromagnetic wave length. He said he began to look at plants from a different perspective. For instance, "the leaves of the trees now appeared to be true solar panels." If he looked at them closely, he said, he could see their technological organization. An example of this ability occurs when we move a potted ficus and its leaves slowly realign themselves to face the sun. The aboriginal shamans of Australia -- without the benefit of hallucinogens -- reach the same conclusions by accessing their dreams. Is it possible that with proper training, humans can pick up low levels of electromagnetic waves that emanate from plants? Is this science fiction or the future of biological thinking?"
The shaman's extensive knowledge and insistence that it came from the plants themselves gnawed at Narby for years. Eventually, his research led him to examine native religious images. That led to his realization that in many native cultures two snakes intertwined symbolized the "origin of life." This occurs even in Alaska where there are no snakes. Half circles shaped like chromosomes often surrounded the intertwined snake images.


Narby compared the snakes to the spiral-shaped building block of all living things, both plants and animals ... DNA. He eventually surmised that both science and the shamans were talking about the same thing. "I had come to consider that the perspective of biologists could be reconciled with that of the ayahuasqueros and both could be true at the same time," Narby said.


He wrote that he believed that a plant had a spirit, a consciousness, an essence. Its DNA had a particular electromagnetic wave length. He said he began to look at plants from a different perspective. For instance, "the leaves of the trees now appeared to be true solar panels." If he looked at them closely, he said, he could see their technological organization. An example of this ability occurs when we move a potted ficus and its leaves slowly realign themselves to face the sun. The aboriginal shamans of Australia -- without the benefit of hallucinogens -- reach the same conclusions by accessing their dreams. Is it possible that with proper training, humans can pick up low levels of electromagnetic waves that emanate from plants? Is this science fiction or the future of biological thinking?

keysnews.com...

Interesting the snake representation and chromosome comparison. Spoken knowledge or visual recognition?
A DNA electromagnetic wavelength? I just wonder if this would be felt rather than heard? I realize plants put off sounds too, and that will be addressed later. I wonder if one could see some type of visual signature given off by a plant. Wouldn't electromagnetic emanations change the air around a plant subtly? Would it create an odor? A frequency? Perhaps we sense their chemical emmanations. Just guessing here, but curious what is specifically detected when they say "spoke" to us. although 'taught" us is a little more broader.
One that lives generation after generation immersed in the plant world surely sees or senses more than we do when it comes to communicating with plants.
I found it interesting that we do share 60% of our dna with bananas.


The shamans insisted that the information came through the plants as images displayed in their brains while in a hallucinogenic trance.


A trance or accessing the information in dreams. What could those images be? Colors, auras, patterns, tones?
The images of the plants were seen by a shaman under the influence of hallucinogens and was described as the 'television of the jungle' by one shaman.
I just feel that some people in our history were able to do this, with such heightened senses compared to our now often dampened ones, they were probably super in tune with all the energies of a jungle. It sounds like some underwent altered states of consciousness and others dreamed. I bet there were some that did it just by observation and perhaps asking a plant to reveal something about it's qualities.

Well, what else could plants talk bout, either outwardly in general or to each other. The documenatray What Plants Talk About

“What we have found is scientific evidence to demonstrate that plants emit their own sound,” she said. “But beside that, they also respond to the same frequency they emit themselves. Those particular frequencies are telling something. What they’re telling is the real question, and we haven’t got an answer for that yet.”

www.netnebraska.org...
CONTINUED -




posted on May, 27 2013 @ 09:59 PM
link   
Sounds like there is much to decipher still. Imagine when we determine these frequencies and may be able to apply some type of control or influence(the good kind of course)

For now, the focus is on learning which plants use which frequencies and what those frequencies are saying … are they anti-predatory? Are they warning signals to other plants? Gagliano hopes to build the knowledge base of plant frequencies to the point where we could use sound to keep plants healthy instead of insecticide or pesticide.

Plants seem to exhibit communication and memory, as demonstrated in the doc. Chemicals, vibrations and frequencies are involved. I just think this is fascinating and will be a big part of our re-evolution soon.
More on plant memory, as I digress.

Do plants have a memory?
Plants definitely have several different forms of memory, just like people do. They have short term memory, immune memory and even transgenerational memory! I know this is a hard concept to grasp for some people, but if memory entails forming the memory (encoding information), retaining the memory (storing information), and recalling the memory (retrieving information), then plants definitely remember. For example a Venus Fly Trap needs to have two of the hairs on its leaves touched by a bug in order to shut, so it remembers that the first one has been touched. But this only lasts about 20 seconds, and then it forgets. Wheat seedlings remember that they’ve gone through winter before they start to flower and make seeds. And some stressed plants give rise to progeny that are more resistant to the same stress, a type of transgenerational memory that’s also been recently shown also in animals. While the short term memory in the venus fly trap is electricity-based, much like neural activity, the longer term memories are based in epigenetics — changes in gene activity that don’t require alterations in the DNA code, as mutations do, which are still passed down from parent to offspring.

www.scientificamerican.com...
Maybe memory of a chemical exchange with humans is passed down with specific plants too, genetically opening up a line of communication that is strengthened by a benefit perhaps.
So what type of sounds do plants make and why?

Scientists at Bristol University used powerful loudspeakers to listen to corn saplings – and heard clicking sounds coming from their roots.
When they suspended their roots in water and played a continuous noise at a similar frequency to the clicks, they found the plants grew towards it.

Plants are known to grow towards light, and research earlier this year from Exeter University found cabbage plants emitted a volatile gas to warn others of danger such as caterpillars or garden shears.

Wow, imagine being able to activate or increase a plants pest defense systems. I would rather tweak or heighten a plants natural abilities than redesign or combine them with other species genetically.


But the researchers say this is the first solid evidence they have their own language of noises, inaudible to human ears.

Daniel Robert, a biology professor at Bristol, said: ‘These very noisy little clicks have the potential to constitute a channel of communication between the roots.

Read more: www.dailymail.co.uk...

Though often too low or too high for human ears to detect, insects and animals signal each other with vibrations. Even trees and plants fizz with the sound of tiny air bubbles bursting in their plumbing.
And there is evidence that insects and plants "hear" each other's sounds.

Sounds of changes in air makes me wonder if that could be better felt than heard, by humans.

and the roots emit clicks of a similar tune. Chili seedlings quicken their growth when a nasty sweet fennel plant is nearby, sealed off from the chilies in a box that only transmits sound, not scent, another study from the group revealed. The fennel releases chemicals that slow other plants' growth, so the researchers think the chili plants grow faster in anticipation of the chemicals — but only because they hear the plant, not because they smell it. Both the fennel and chilies were also in a sound-isolated box.

This makes me think chemicals may be just as important as the electromagnetic waves for communication.

Agliano imagines that root-to-root alerts could transform a forest into an organic switchboard. "Considering that entire forests are all interconnected by networks of fungi, maybe plants are using fungi the way we use the Internet and sending acoustic signals through this Web. From here, who knows," she said.

Man they should listen to what the fungus has to say and talk about a "forest switchboard."

The technology to hear plant bubbles explode is actually quite simple. Acoustic sensors designed to detect cracks in bridges and buildings catch the ultrasonic pops. A piezoelectric pickup, the same as an electric guitar pickup, goes through an amplifier to an oscilloscope that measures the waveform of each pop.

What if one could measurably match the oscillation frequency of a plant? Could any influence be applied? More questions than answers I suppose.

We're working on trying to differentiate these two signals: I'm cold versus I'm really thirsty," Wardell said. "We've already managed to produce a few squawks.

www.livescience.com...

Seems like lots of sounds are involved, and perhaps even specific ones for various needs.
I just think with common dna and genes, and all this exhibition of varied sounds, humans have the capacity to hear or somehow sense characteristics in plants. I hope further research may reveal more about this connection and we can put it to good use and begin a more harmonious relationship with plants.
I wonder if like some other species, they have a mating or attracting call of some sort? Do they sing or vibrate as a healthy state of being. I know, we can't project too many humanistic traits on them, but still curious nonetheless.

Plant intelligence? A good read Here

In my research I discovered a unique group of genes necessary for a plant to determine if it’s in the light or in the dark. When we reported our findings, it appeared these genes were unique to the plant kingdom, which fit well with my desire to avoid any thing touching on human biology.
But much to my surprise and against all of my plans, I later discovered that this same group of genes is also part of the human DNA.

This led to the obvious question as to what these seemingly “plant-specific” genes do in people. Many years later, we now know that these same genes are important in animals for the timing of cell division, the axonal growth of neurons, and the proper functioning of the immune system.

But plants don't have neurons, so how can they be defined as able to think?

But while plants don’t have neurons, plants both produce and are affected by neuroactive chemicals! For example, the glutamate receptor is a neuroreceptor in the human brain necessary for memory formation and learning. While plants don’t have neurons, they do have glutamate receptors and what’s fascinating is that the same drugs that inhibit the human glutamate receptor also affect plants. From studying these proteins in plants, scientists have learned how glutamate receptors mediate communication from cell to cell. So maybe the question should be posed to a neurobiologist if there could be a botany of humans, minus the flowers!

Darwin, one of the great plant researchers, proposed what has become known as the “root-brain” hypothesis. Darwin proposed that the tip of the root, the part that we call the meristem, acts like the brain does in lower animals, receiving sensory input and directing movement.

Fascinating....
Well this subject just kind of blew my mind and I wanted to bring it onboard. I don't think I will see plants the same way anymore.
Hope you enjoyed the information here, and I realize it is a bit scattered, but I did not know there was so much going on and following the related links just expanded the quest for insight.

Peace,
spec
edit on 27-5-2013 by speculativeoptimist because: You know, just fixin' things




posted on May, 27 2013 @ 10:55 PM
link   
reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 


I thought The Cosmic Serpent was facinating. I have not really heard anyone speak about it and its been probably 10 years since I've read it. I am goung to dig more into your thread tomorrow when I have time.

There seems to be mounting evidence for this and I wouldn't be surprised in the least. Some time back I also read a study on crows remembering people they thought were a danger and somehow sharing the information amongst other crows far distances away and years later. Seems like one idea suggested plant communication in that as well. I will see what I can dig up on that also.

Thanks for the interesting post.



posted on May, 27 2013 @ 11:27 PM
link   
I think that all living things give off vibrations that can be construed as a type of communication. We as well as other animals use the vibrations that we pick up on as signals to warn of the different elements that another living thing might harbor. It is done in the same way that a bee or a dog can "see" the fear in you.

Indigenous people the world over have utilized dreams to help navigate their lives. It is in the altered states of consciousness that some things become more clear, because the common distractions of every day life tend to get in the way. Some use drugs, or other tools to quiet the distractions, some look to dreams, and some practice the discipline of clearing out the distractions with meditation etc.

There is something extraordinary about the shamans devising medicines from the various plants and techniques used to create the remedies. Science has proven over and over that there are clear benefits to some of these concoctions that would have been more than impossible to find just by trial and error. I don't know if I think that the plants are talking to us. I would tend to think that if they needed to say something, it wouldn't be "eat me I'll make you feel better", but I do think that there is some element about our reality that makes it possible to find the answers that we need through meditation or dreams or some sort of altered consciousness. I think that it may be that we have some hidden ability to see and understand the intricate workings of nature, but that it's just not clearly laid out for us to see.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 12:11 AM
link   
reply to post by CrawlingKingsnake
 

Thanks CK, I just learned about this book/story myself and was so wowed I decide to dig into it, finding a plethora of info. The memory aspect is an integral part it seems, and how it is transferred varies.
Look forward to the crow story.

Peace,
spec



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 12:47 AM
link   
Wow. This post was very well put together.

I've always believed that plants were capable of communication. Even from a young age I could imagine plants having a "conscience", if you will. And honestly it really is nice to see some science behind the theory!
I wonder, though, will they be able to isolate all of these different sounds and decode the 'language'? I can only imagine the things that we could learn from these developments. Guess I gotta start diggin' into your links. (ha).
Snf!



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 02:02 AM
link   
reply to post by speculativeoptimist
 

Canadian anthropologist Jeremy Narby in his 1999 book, "The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge," spent two years with the Ashaninka Indians in Quirishari, Peru. He examined the medicinal information garnered by shamans who claimed that plants spoke to them and taught them how to develop medicines. He found complicated combinations of plants developed into Indian medicines.


I've heard this idea a few times over the years and it certainly made me wonder for a while. The thing is, the idea in itself is amongst the most unlikely explanations for why we use plants. The most likely is trial and error going all the way back (in some lineages) to the origins of our species and beyond. So for example, staples like bananas would have been used before we were walking upright.

Other more medicinal plants would have been discovered over similarly vast time periods. Currently, the outer edge of human migration into the Americas is thought, by some, to be maybe ~20kya. Ayauasca would have been discovered as humans migrated through the souther belt of the Americas and off into mainland south America. I picture us as like caterpillars on leaves...munching our way forward. The thing is, all the knowledge of 'safe foods' would be left behind and everything in front was potentially nutritious or poisonous.

They'd have to be eating the stuff to find out the hard way. No doubt some died.

Sure, 'shamans say' isn't something to be dismissed and neither is the research of Narby. At the same time, it's not a logical progression to claim the plants 'spoke' or taught us about medicinal plants. We know for sure that animals use medicinal plants and that sheds light on our own journeys of discovery.

The animals have a knowledge of useful plants in their regions that's been passed down by demonstration for many years. Take them out of their natural environment and it's back to trial and error. I'm pretty sure we went the same way.

I do agree with the concept that such discoveries may have inspired powerful ideas that have influenced the course of human history. Unfortunately, that's about all we can say about it as the T&Cs are very clear.

S&F for a thought-provoking and well-written thread.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:15 AM
link   
reply to post by Quauhtli
 

Thank you Quauhtli, and yea I would rather focus on the language more than the altered states, particularly due to the TC's, but as you say, other settings from trance or dream states, or maybe even solitary observation are used also. I think much could emerge from these abilities.

spec



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 03:16 AM
link   
reply to post by TooManyTheories
 

Thank you TMT
I hope more 'decoding' will occur from facilitating these ideas with scientific testing. Even if the language is simple or limited, it still provides a more direct connection to the plants.
Hope ya dig the links and info therein.

spec
edit on 28-5-2013 by speculativeoptimist because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 05:41 AM
link   
What a interesting thread. I would like to add this video and description to your thread

Mr Klausner, a botanist, devises a machine that can translate a plant's noise into speech. It records the screams of flowers as they are being cut. A doctor believes that Mr Klausner's delusions are a cause for treatment.

www.youtube.com...



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 06:49 AM
link   

Originally posted by Kandinsky
I've heard this idea a few times over the years and it certainly made me wonder for a while. The thing is, the idea in itself is amongst the most unlikely explanations for why we use plants. The most likely is trial and error going all the way back (in some lineages) to the origins of our species and beyond.
Trial and error seems likely. Some form of primitive communication between plants seems possible. Shamans hallucinating while taking hallucinogenics seems likely.

But plants communicating complex information to Shamans never occurred to me, and even after reading this thread, it still doesn't occur to me as even a remote possibility. At least the OP recognizes this is a highly speculative idea, but I think even that characterization is a stretch. For one thing, it pre-supposes among plants not only an extraordinary communication ability, but also a familiarity with human anatomy/biology to create a "prescription". I can think of hundreds of more likely explanations for the observed facts, than plants actually giving humans "prescriptions". Trial and error is as good an explanation as any, or humans watching what other animals do is another.


At the same time, it's not a logical progression to claim the plants 'spoke' or taught us about medicinal plants. We know for sure that animals use medicinal plants and that sheds light on our own journeys of discovery.
Thanks for the fascinating link! It's not surprising that animals use plants for medicinal purposes, and I agree that there is probably a lot of trial and error involved. It would be interesting to know how they pass what they've learned on to successive generations.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:00 AM
link   
Awesome post! There was another one like it a few weeks ago about how scientists believe animals are alive and have feelings. The part you mentioned about cabbages emiting a volatile gas in the presence of garden sheers demonstrates this and at the same time is quite concerning. It reminds me of the movie "The Happening" where plants start releasing a chemical that causes people to commit suicide.

So what does this mean when it comes to eating plants? I have heard some vegans will first ask the plant for permission and thank it afterwards whilst only taking a small amount, but even in that case the plant could be screaming like hell. We do need to eat though so it really puzzles me the moral implications and why nature works this way and allows it?

The concept of classifying plants (possibly animals and humans too) through electromagnetic signatures is very interesting. I also like the concept of using acoustics or EM fields to yield a better crop. It makes me wonder what our current EM fields from cell towers and such are doing not only to us but to everything else in nature.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:27 AM
link   
nice to have a thread which gives other readers a glimpse of the surface of something strange

since plants are not mobile, self contained biological units(like humans & animals)
the brain-speech analogies are not the propermodels...

plants have an Essence...which some humans might attune to when in deep thought or an altered state of reality
the Essence radiated by each plant or family of plants is usually augmented with colors. aroma, even symmetry which might be akin to the anthrophormic 'golden ratio'

'The Day of the Triffids' is a story of plants becoming mobile
see: en.wikipedia.org...



thanks



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:40 AM
link   
I am waiting for the " The Happening " to occur, if plants are as alive as we are, I can only imagine the WMDs they are preparing for us. Better keep this between me and you though, don't need Bush, obama or anyone else catching whiff and bombing random plants everywhere, we must have tact!

Or weed killer, a tarp, something dimly lit and dry, anyone from congress works!



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 07:53 AM
link   
reply to post by Arbitrageur
 



For one thing, it pre-supposes among plants not only an extraordinary communication ability, but also a familiarity with human anatomy/biology to create a "prescription".



Trial and error is as good an explanation as any, or humans watching what other animals do is another.


Good points and we'd need to have something extraordinary before beginning to think that particular plants are communicating with certain people.

It's entirely plausible that people who have eaten such plants have experiences wherein the plants take on dramatic and significant importance. After all, during the experience (choosing my words very carefully here), the plant would be foremost in the mind.

Where the Western interest lies is in the sense that some 'spirit' of plant consciousness is communicating with the human consciousness. That's an interesting concept, but hard to stand by without experiencing such a connection. Unfortunately, what's left without experience are the recollections of folk already imbued with a belief in spirits. Again, this doesn't mean rushing to dismiss the claims, but it pretty much divides people according to their beliefs. As ever, where a shaman encounters spirits, the neuroscientist encounters chemical markers subverting our sensory pathways.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 12:59 PM
link   
It's my belief that Narby's writings may be some of the most important research conducted in modern times. However, It's all but ignored in the scientific communities and honestly, I'm surprised to see this thread still open after reading it this morning. Kudos to the OP for providing the information in such a way that it does not violate ATS T&Cs.

I first discovered Jeremy's theories after noticing one day that the Ceduceus resembled DNA with it's double helix formation. The Ceduceus, two intertwined serpents wrapped around a winged staff, was the staff carried by Hermes of Greek mythology. Hermes was a god of transitions and boundries and moved freely between worlds, he was the emmisary of the gods. When I looked up the Ceduceus on one of my favorite websites (Fusionanomaly.net) I was presented with a link to The Cosmic Serpent page which proceeded to blow my mind....


Jeremy made the connection between the symbolism of the Ceduceus and the ancient stories of the winged or feathered serpent as the bringer of knowledge. He noteds that a strand of DNA, when viewed under an electron microscope, resembles a feathered serpent. He also described the stories of S. American Shamans recounting their experiences when under the induced trance state.(Cosmic Serpent Excerpts - FusionAnomaly)


It is as if they knew about the molecular properties of plants and the art of combining them, and when one asks them how they know these things, they say their knowledge comes directly from *snip* plants.


Narby made more connections:


The spirits one sees in *trance state* are three-dimensional, sound-emitting images, and they speak a language made of three-dimensional, sound-emitting images. In other words, they are made of their own language, like DNA."



Then my friend said, "Yes, and like DNA they replicate themselves to relay their information." I jotted this down, and it was later in reviewing my notes on the relationship between the *trance* spirits made of language and DNA that I remembered the first verse of the first chapter of the Gospel according to John: "In the beginning was the logos"–the word, the verb, the language.


Soon, Jeremy made a break through when he discovered the work of Fritz Albert Popp and his research into Biophotons:


During my readings, I learned with astonishment that the wavelength at which DNA emits these photons corresponds exactly to the narrow band of visible light. Yet this did not constitute proof that the light emitted by DNA was what shamans saw in their visions. Furthermore, there was a fundamental aspect of this photon emission that I could not grasp. According to the researchers who measured it, its weakness is such that it corresponds "to the intensity of a candle at a distance of about 10 kilometers," but it has "a surprisingly high degree of coherence, as compared to that of technical fields (laser)."


Biophotons

Narby came to realize that Biophoton activity was the mechanism by which communication occured between all forms of life.

In my opinion, Biophoton communication accounts for the various forms paranormal psychic phenomena as well.

When you begin to think of the implications of this knowledge you can understand why it is repressed.

Jeremy Narby, PhD, grew up in Canada and Switzerland, studied history at the University of Canterbury, and received his doctorate in anthropology from Stanford University. He is author of _The Cosmic Serpent: DNA and the Origins of Knowledge_ (Tarcher/Putnam, 1998).



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 01:33 PM
link   
reply to post by Kandinsky
 

Hey Kandinsky, congrats on the moderator position man, I think you make a fine moderator.



I picture us as like caterpillars on leaves...munching our way forward. The thing is, all the knowledge of 'safe foods' would be left behind and everything in front was potentially nutritious or poisonous.

No doubt this process happens, and I am sure the literal trial and errors provided much or most "teachings" but I also think reading plants may be a big part too because I just feel that growing up in a jungle particularly would enable humans to have a more intimate and direct connection with plants. Being surrounded by the lush vegetation each and every day and having senses that I would guess were heightened naturally, would perhaps enable one to notice qualities in more detail via other ways mentioned in thread.


it's not a logical progression to claim the plants 'spoke' or taught us about medicinal plants.

Hmm, well I say yes and no because we have not lived with generations in the jungles and so our current logic may not include such connections, but in a different time and environment, I feel that plant/human communication may have been a natural process, speculatively speaking of course.

Thanks for the link and it has shed some light on the idea of knowledge passed and stored about plants. I just wonder if humans could possibly sense things that other creatures and insects sense about each other when it comes to systems and cycles. If nature provided these chemical and frequency communication abilities, why should we humans, gifted with a wonderful sensory system, coupled with higher intelligence, to be able to utilize more than just memory.
So while I agree most animals as well as human pasts have utilized the memory and tradition, I still feel there has been more too the story, even if a minority by comparison. To me, the idea of reading plants still seems natural and possible and perhaps what we should be developing or reconnecting to.

The hallucination thing is an entire subject in itself and I just wanted to use the Narby story as a catalyst, without delving into the whole potential of substance induced states of mind, a TC no no. It is the other info possibly transmitted that I am interested in.

Thanks for the reply,
spec



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 01:48 PM
link   
reply to post by lightmere
 


Is that a show, as in fiction? Interesting indeed and there is evidence that plants do repond to harm.
Clive Backster
A good read Primary Percptionwww.goodreads.com... shows that plants respond to intention as well.


Can plants actually hear sound? This was the conclusion of Cleve Backster back in the 1960s. He's the former CIA interrogation specialist that connected polygraph sensors to plants and discovered that they reacted to harm (i.e. cutting their leaves) and even to harmful thoughts of humans in proximity to them.

Backster decided on impulse to attach his polygraph electrodes to the now-famous dracaena in his office, then water the plant and see if the leaves responded. Finding that the plant indeed reacted to this event, he decided to see what would happen if he threatened it, and formed in his mind the idea of lighting a match to the leaf where the electrodes were attached.
And that was when something happened that forever changed Baxter's life and ours. For the plant didn't wait for him to light the match. It reacted to his thoughts!

Through further research, Baxter found that it was his intent, and not merely the thought itself, that brought about this reaction.

He also discovered that plants were aware of each other, mourned the death of anything (even the bacteria killed when boiling water is poured down the drain), strongly disliked people who killed plants carelessly or even during scientific research, and fondly remembered and extended their energy out to the people who had grown and tended them, even when their "friends" were far away in both time and space.

In fact, he found, plants can react "in the moment" to events taking place thousands of miles away. And not only are they psychic, they also are prophetic, anticipating negative and positive events, including weather.

One of the most important things that Backster discovered was that, instead of going ballistic, plants that find themselves in the presence of overwhelming danger simply become catatonic! This phenomenon has posed endless problems for those researchers who, unlike Backster, do not respect the sentience of their subjects. Under such circumstances, the plants they are studying evince no reaction whatsoever. They simply "check out."
www.viewzone.com...



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 01:56 PM
link   
Once you learn to hear the trees, you will find that they never shut up...Ask them a question and they are all chatting away at the same time like a room full of kids.



posted on May, 28 2013 @ 01:56 PM
link   
reply to post by Eonnn
 

Thank you Eonnn! I thought the plot for The Happening was fascinating and who knows how many ways nature can affect populations of her species. We know about the ant fungus which is a bizarre phenomenon.

I had not considered any 'moral' implications, and I wonder if any uncovered insight into plants may warrant such ideas? I personally doubt it but not 100% certain either. I do not think plants have the complexity to be intertwined into sentience, although I do feel that our intention and actions affect plants and should be considered in handling and managing them.

The Em fields and whatever other kind of electromagnetic energy we put off are probably issues that should be considered. Our web of life is set up to work in harmony with the natural world and our unnatural tech and industries surely produce some type of measurable effect, WHo knows, maybe the plants thrive on some of our technological emanations...says the optimist.

Peace,
spec





new topics




 
28
<<   2  3 >>

log in

join