Interesting Impact Picture On Moon

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posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:48 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


I could be wrong but I believe that is where the GRAIL mission impacted the surface to analyze fuel consumption and gravitational data.

A little info here-en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 6/13/2013 by unsteadystate because: Added hyperlink for further information
edit on 6/13/2013 by unsteadystate because: Changed info to correct data




posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:53 PM
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edit on 6/13/2013 by unsteadystate because: double post sorry mods



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by unsteadystate
 


GRAIL impact coordinates were (Source Wikipedia) :
Both spacecraft impacted an unnamed lunar mountain between Philolaus and Mouchez at 75.62°N 26.63°W.

OP impact crater coordinates are

The coordinates for this area is:

-12.31646
-50.26187


Any math people here?



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by unsteadystate
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


I could be wrong but I believe that is where the GRAIL mission impacted the surface to analyze debris for its chemical makeup.

A little info here-en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 6/13/2013 by unsteadystate because: Added hyperlink for further information


Afraid not.

Grail impacted close to the north pole of the moon.

The impact image that I show in my OP is at -50 degrees from the equator (so it's going towards the south pole of the moon).

It's actually not too far from Tycho crater. I gave the coordinates in my OP.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


LOL, thats why I said could be wrong! Looks fairly recent to me though.



posted on Jun, 13 2013 @ 10:59 PM
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Originally posted by unsteadystate
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


LOL, thats why I said could be wrong! Looks fairly recent to me though.


I thought so too because of how fresh the material exposed from impact looks.

However, keep in mind "recent" in astronomical terms can be fairly long, tens of thousands of years if not millions.



posted on Jun, 16 2013 @ 12:03 PM
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I was somewhat intriqued by the LROC view that I decided to produce an enhancement of the image just to see if further detail of the feature could be realized. If you look closely, it can be seen that the enhancement has produced some other features on the terrain that were quite unexpected.

The original crop was 704 pixels wide at 0.5m/pixel (352 meters wide).

The image shown below is 580 pixels wide which equates to 0.61m/pixel.

Click on the Direct link below for a larger view.





Direct view:

i985.photobucket.com...



posted on Jun, 18 2013 @ 03:31 PM
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I have added the animation below so members can make a comparison between the quick map image and the enhanced version.

I know most people will only give the animation a casual glance but the view is crowded with what I believe are many built structures. In fact, if you look carefully at the lower left part of the images there would appear to be a very large structure with what would appear to be a large pipe coming out of it.

I think the enhanced version is the type of view that the LRO camera captures so why are we not able to observe similar views in quick map. Anyway, have a look and see if you recognize any of the structural objects.






posted on Jun, 22 2013 @ 10:33 AM
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Just had a look at quick map to observe the feature shown in the OP and it's not there! So, if you start searching for the feature shown in the OP at the given coordinates you will not find it. What you will find is an image that has replaced it with terrain that is not the same. You will probably notice that the image to the immediate right, the other side of the black band, is the same as can be observed in the OP.

This has only happened since I posted the enhanced images which show there are a vast number of built structures on the lunar surface. So what could the image handlers be up to? Are they trying to pull the wool over our eyes or are they trying to discredit the enhancement I produced. In my opinion, this type of action of replacing one view with a completely different view is not a very scientific approach.

I would be interested to know what members think of this change of image.



posted on Jun, 22 2013 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by arianna
 


The imagery has been updated is all. Go back and look at Wildspace's post here:

www.abovetopsecret.com...

As you can see from the pictures, the terrain is the same



posted on Jun, 22 2013 @ 01:55 PM
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reply to post by arianna
 


The feature is there, it's just that the image strips are not aligned properly, and the crater appears twice:
Permalink


By the way, here's a recent LROC image of a similar crater, with dark and light features.
edit on 22-6-2013 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 04:39 AM
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To erik and wildespace, you are correct.

Although the image has been replaced it has been mis-aligned and that is what threw me. If any members would like to view the image as shown in the OP, it can be viewed at the following address.

wms.lroc.asu.edu...

The feature is located about half-way down the image strip.



posted on Jun, 23 2013 @ 06:25 AM
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Originally posted by minkmouse
It's certainly imagination fodder as in I can tell you what my imaginative mind sees but in truth I have not a duce of an idea....Cool find!............PHAGE!!!

Had to.


No, you really didn't.

(pass the sick bag please)

Certainly looks like an unusual crater...i came up with that all by myself with no vomit bag required.



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 01:47 PM
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reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Someone spotted that crater before you did, eriktheawful.
lpod.wikispaces.com...



posted on Jun, 25 2013 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by wildespace
reply to post by eriktheawful
 


Someone spotted that crater before you did, eriktheawful.
lpod.wikispaces.com...


Ah! But I was the first to bring it to ATS's attention!






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