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Got a metal detector, now what?

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posted on May, 24 2013 @ 10:30 AM
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Okay folks, I figured the general chat was the right forum for this and running in the general lines of ATS, a metal detector for all it's supposedly capable of, fits in well with overall topics.

What I've got here is a Whites MXT Metal Detector. As the link and specs show, it retails around $800 which would tend to tell me it's not a toy or casual model. As you may be able to tell by now, I know nothing about metal detecting or detectors. I got this by inheritance and want to do something with it. Use it for some benefit, preferably.


It's also taken a record short time to discover it's not as simple as just tossing a ring or something into high grass and instantly finding it. There is a learning curve and skill to develop with this thing, as it's quick to demonstrate. lol.....

What I thought might be worth asking and perhaps a general discussion topic for all to benefit from is whether, 1. is a model of this type worth in capability what the time will be in learning and making it really work well? and 2. what good stuff have people found? Are these basically just for keepsakes and souvenirs or can decent money come out of finds with one in this quality range, by a normal person? (As opposed to a crew, like the American Digger show covers in their reality show).




posted on May, 24 2013 @ 10:36 AM
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I'm personally not into metal detecting (Why? Because I don't have a detector!) but I know someone who is. I'll e-mail them the link you shared with me and see what he says about question numero uno.

As far as your second question goes--- he's not only made his money back, but he's profited. overall it's a hobby, but he has found some really cool things in very unsuspecting places.

People here in northern california find quite a lot of things here. I've been witness to it: old man on the beach finds a amazing antique ring. He looked very surprised and happy!

Glad you can afford one o' these things--- I'll get back to you when he replies.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 10:43 AM
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It's a good detector and you will be able to find what you want. You could start just by scanning coins, rings both gold and silver that way you can tell what range they fall into. But no matter how long you use one you will always get some trash from time to time. So all that is left is to hit the beach or parks and start hunting. Also please remember to fill in your holes people that don't give other hunters a bad name.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 10:46 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Now what?
If you lived near me(you don't) you could find the many arrows I have lost in the woods by me house-I would pay you for it!

I would say just head for known metorite sites,check local maps and find the known trajectories.
You could find a mega chunk of metorite and get super rich.

Or head to old battlefields/ancient sites if you can get permission.
Research the sites beforehand to locate the best areas of potential.
Good luck and be sure take pic and show us anything cool you find!

edit on 24/5/2013 by Silcone Synapse because: extra words added



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 10:49 AM
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Get the lifeguard!!!



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 11:13 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Gz
I got one myself
get ready to find a lot of human waste, its everywhere !!

The best place to start looking for interesting artifacts are in untouched nature, or just a place where modern humans don't come often... because you know it could in fact be something interesting if it beeps, instead of 99% human garbage.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Go hit the beach.
People lose things all the time in the sand.

In the ocean too. You'd be surprised at how many Rolex's are at the bottom of the ocean.
Looks like sports fishermen lose them a lot.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 11:22 AM
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Get some sample metals...
Power up and try to figure how to differentiate ...
The Instructions are available on line and Whites is a respected family business of long lineage...
They will gladly service or repair your detector...and they are friendly guys....get their news letter...
Then start looking into some local history a bit.....
There may be battle sites, or other old sites that are often ignored or forgotten.
Start thinking like somebody who wants to stash a treasure, has no safedeposit box, and lives primitvely
Treasur stories abound all over the country...lost goldmines lost loot from robberies
bullion, bars, sliver coins,the old guys didnt use paper....
also good for sniping in known gold bearing creeks...
They will find the nugget, you decide where the gold might have ended up....
lots of new stuff to learn Wrab!
majorly cool!.s oh, and check the many finds and failures on you tube for encouragement

edit on 24-5-2013 by stirling because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 11:34 AM
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This has a prospector mode and the manual indicates it's what it sounds like. It's intended for detecting gold (and other minerals) in the 'rough' so to speak and not in jewelry and such. From what I understand, there is gold in Missouri, as there is as a general rule, all over the place. Not in mine-able quantity, and that's not what I'm curious about.

My family's land has a major named (on state maps) creek crossing it though that goes from raging little river in the rainy season to bone dry bed during the summer. I'd say about 15-20 feet across and well dug down for water action with very clear sign of historic flow by lay of the land changes. So it's mature, crosses counties for length and with all kinds of different rock and stone areas along the bed.

Has anyone on here ever actually found metals of value by detector like this? I'm sure I can find stories online if I look but I'm more interested in real, living people for a personal experience than a story I know nothing of the truth about? It would be quite an effort over periods this summer to make a real detector trip across the length of creek bed in question. Acres for what it crosses... Worth the effort?



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:00 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Step One: Acquire whip, hat, revolver, and said metal detector. (small Asain helper optional)

Step Two: ?????

Step Three: Profit



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by MessOnTheFED!
 

Ahh Yes, if you can find me a university to fund the travel and expenses like the movie, I can certainly supply the energy and proper outfit. lol.....

This actually came down to me from my Dad's estate and I'm just starting to get into parts of it, after a couple years. He'd bought this while living in California to go try and find gold in the dry washes across the high desert. Apparently people finding enough to at least pay the gas and a little bonus of cash isn't unheard of. Again though, reading about it is one thing for the time it would take to attempt it. Hearing from someone who has actually found something of that kind with one of these makes a difference.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


I don't have any advice. Just wanted to let you know that I'm jealous. I've wanted a metal detector since I was a kid. If i was you I would start in that creek bed. Probably be your best bet. Or a beach. Or just go into the woods. You'd be surprised the things you find in the woods. People have lived everywhere.

MOTF!



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by MessOnTheFED!
 


it certainly can't hurt to just go out and play with, to be sure. Obviously, some areas I'll skip...like the nature/state land near firing ranges. lol...but the only way to learn is to do I suppose. I'm trying to just find the 'stakes' that are supposed to be out at the curb line for marking property line corners in this area but even that isn't working out. I'd just gotten to really reading on it though and coming to see the displays are actually multiple, separate ones on the same screen. They look related, but may or may not match up and the difference tells information itself. I guess everything worth doing has a learning curve.

To what was said earlier about a meteorite? That is actually part of my quiet hope. I would love to find one. Just one and not even a big one. I'd settle for baseball size with something unusual about it. That would weigh a bunch in a market that sells by gram weight. I figure the surface everywhere has a few billion years of being sprinkled with them. They have to be out there in more quantity than would first appear? Just sheer odds, I'd think?



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Wouldn't you know... I'm a land surveyor. The stakes ususally arent at the curb. They will be passed the sidewalk (if you live in a subdivision) or generally 20 or 30 feet from the centerline of the road.

MOTF!



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:31 PM
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At the very least you should join an online metal detecting and treasure hunting club. The stories you will hear alone will be worth it. You should also join a local group and hit them up for some OJT. Congratulations!

When hunting for gold, ground balancing is critical.
edit on 5-24-2013 by groingrinder because: Edited for even more words.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:54 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


You already recieved good advice on learning what it can and cannot do. After that it'll be fine tuning your ear even though you are lost in thought or having that same song play over and over in your head. My Dad said that was his problem. It can be monotonous at times.

But he researched the historical archives of the surrounding counties where he lived in Texas and Wisconsin. Found where towns & farms used to be. Those areas always turned up interesting things.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:55 PM
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reply to post by MessOnTheFED!
 


Okay, maybe you can help then... My city doesn't believe in sidewalks and never bothered with them..lol.. The front yards run grass to curb and then to the streets which are wide enough to park on each side and just barely pass in either direction if the vehicles parked aren't right on the curb.

I've been looking right around where the grass meets curb since anything past is under the pavement and there isn't anything else but my front yard? This is a residential tract area inside a regular city. 1/4 acre lots approx. Any ideas then? I get too many hits at the curb and figured I'm hitting on re-bar inside the concrete. Lotta good that does me.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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Well, heck. I always got a giggle when I'd see the folks with their metal detectors. After reading this thread, I've come to one conclusion:

I want one, too!



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 05:09 PM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


More than likely any hits near the concrete are going to be rebar. Go to the centerline of the street. Pace off 20 feet perpendicular to the street, near the dividing fence between you and your neighbors yard. (about 6 or 7 steps).

If you don't get a hit there, try 25 then 30 feet from the centerline of the road. Right of ways in the city are usually 40 feet, but they can be 50 or 60 feet. I've even seen 100 foot right of ways on some boulevards.

The pipe will probably be inside of your yard more than you think. They have such big right of ways to maintain utilities.

MOTF!



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 05:27 PM
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I am serious Wrabbit go check u toob..theres lots of REAL, PEOPLE showing their ways of detecting.maybe a pointer would help...
tide lines and places where people tend to sit and relax at the beaches, as well as the swimming areas under water and exposed from low tide.
guys walk in the river getting civil war bullets from old battles.
other guys check the creeks and water courses for gold or even platinium etc.
Youve got a good machine get with the program....

Always fill in your holes after hey

edit on 24-5-2013 by stirling because: (no reason given)

edit on 24-5-2013 by stirling because: (no reason given)



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