Common Core Standards to be Used to Indoctrinate First Graders For the Good of the Collective.

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posted on May, 25 2013 @ 12:19 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 





The database includes test scores and attendance as well as learning disabilities, supposedly collected as a way to profle children, in cooperation with School Districts. This information is then stored, and provides a detailed view of students' educational experiences.


Sound like that "Permanent Record" that my teachers were always threatening us with. "I hope you know this is going to go on your permanent record!"




posted on May, 25 2013 @ 12:24 PM
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reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 


Aaaaaaaaand that's why my wife and I are home schooling our son.


Common Core or not.

Just having our son talk about our time together on the shooting range would probably get him ousted at an American school.
His reading and math and language skills are already above his grade level, why put him in an environment where they won't encourage and promote his learning?



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 12:26 PM
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reply to post by burntheships
 


Now THIS is a big problem, and scary.

We use a state-wide database for tracking student achievement. It's called NCWise, but we are switching to a new database this fall.

Everything on the database is information that schools have always kept in the cumulative folder for each student. I could ask for mine, from when I attended school in the 80s and early 90s, and see the same info. Grades, attendance, teacher comments...it's all there and all the same.

The only thing that's changed is putting this info in an online database. Of course we are told this is highly secured, but I'm sure a determined and skillful hacker could access the info. I have no understanding of hacking, but that seems a safe bet to make.

I'm far more concerned about who has the right to see this info, and why parents aren't involved in the process. This is confidential material, and should stay that way.

I'll be addressing this to my school board at the next session. Or I'll try to...many times they won't let me speak. Not just me, anyone. (I'm not that big of a deal, lol). But I'll pursue this and let you guys know what I find.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 12:29 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer
reply to post by ElectricUniverse
 


Aaaaaaaaand that's why my wife and I are home schooling our son.


Common Core or not.

Just having our son talk about our time together on the shooting range would probably get him ousted at an American school.
His reading and math and language skills are already above his grade level, why put him in an environment where they won't encourage and promote his learning?


Good for you, Beez. I wish we had the same option. Luckily we can help our son after school and over the summer. A lot of parents can't.

With NCLB, we teach to the lowest common denominator. Who gets left out now? The kids ahead of the curve.

Makes me want to throw my hands in the air and give up on education.

Deep breaths, deep breaths, deep breaths.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 12:35 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl


With NCLB, we teach to the lowest common denominator. Who gets left out now? The kids ahead of the curve.



At my son's previous school, they recommended Ritalin because he was getting bored and squirrely. I said "Give him more work to do".

They said, "Oh no, we can't do that. It would be fair."

They are drugging kids to keep them AT the lowest common denominator. Nothing you don't already know.

But it irritates me to no end!



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 12:42 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
reply to post by burntheships
 


Now THIS is a big problem, and scary.


Yes, it is! I did not realize at first when I posted the first thread on it,
that the data base was part of the Common Core package.

To think that somewhere down the line some corporation stands to
profit from this....mind boggling even if the data is somehow separated from
the childs name....not that anything says it will be.

That the data should be allowed to be sold is reprehensible!


While inBloom pledges to guard the data tightly, its own privacy policy states that it “cannot guarantee the security of the information stored … or that the information will not be intercepted when it is being transmitted.” techcircle.vccircle.com...



The New York Civil Liberties Union blasted the city for failing to disclose the plan to the public or offer parents a chance to opt out.

Public Advocate Bill de Blasio protested the move in a letter to city and state officials.

"I don't want my kids' privacy bought and sold like this," de Blasio wrote
www.nbcnewyork.com...


It sends shivers down my arms to think that Bill Gates is involved with this,
and also Bill Ayers too....an unrepentant terrorist. (that is an aside it would not really
matter who funded this, its just wrong!) .

Good for you smyleegrl for taking it to the board!

At least parents will be aware....sadly it seems there may not be much that
can be done.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 01:08 PM
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Originally posted by beezzer

Originally posted by smyleegrl


With NCLB, we teach to the lowest common denominator. Who gets left out now? The kids ahead of the curve.



At my son's previous school, they recommended Ritalin because he was getting bored and squirrely. I said "Give him more work to do".

They said, "Oh no, we can't do that. It would be fair."

They are drugging kids to keep them AT the lowest common denominator. Nothing you don't already know.

But it irritates me to no end!


It also irritates me when very young kids, k-2nd, have behavior issues and the first response is ADHD.

My question is...how often do these kids get to MOVE? Do you expect them to sit at a desk all day? No wonder there's an epidemic of Ritalin in our society.

Kids have short attention spans. Not because they need drugs, but because they are KIDS!



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 04:49 PM
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I think they should be reading the United States Constitution and the Declaration of Independence from pre-k. Yea, I know they can't read, but it should be brought up early and consistently. Math, also should be strongly pushed. As well as all forms of science. Reading and writing just go hand in hand with the previous subjects.

In elementary(5th grade), we were totally out of hand in our class. The teacher would punish us by making us write the Constitution(word for word), Declaration of Independence, or words out the dictionary beginning with the first letter of our name all the way to Z. I was so jealous of Zaza when that punishment came around, but she thought of this and made her go backwards. I totally hated it then, but I'd thank that teacher if I saw her today.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 05:02 PM
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reply to post by beezzer
 
What ever happened to just letting kids be kids? You mean to tell me that in less then one generation that all of a sudden kids have ADHD. We called it being full of energy. You had gym class and you really exercised. Do they exercise in school anymore? Do they even let kids play on recess on what is left of the playground? Doesn't it really amaze anyone how fast things are changing and how many new deceases and mental problems we all of a sudden have? I still think we should just be teaching kids the basics and let life teach them the rest.

Just my 2 cents.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 06:42 PM
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Originally posted by Tarzan the apeman.
reply to post by beezzer
 
What ever happened to just letting kids be kids? You mean to tell me that in less then one generation that all of a sudden kids have ADHD. We called it being full of energy. You had gym class and you really exercised. Do they exercise in school anymore? Do they even let kids play on recess on what is left of the playground? Doesn't it really amaze anyone how fast things are changing and how many new deceases and mental problems we all of a sudden have? I still think we should just be teaching kids the basics and let life teach them the rest.

Just my 2 cents.


At my school, we have 45 minutes of gym class for one week, every third week. Then twenty minutes of recess, if the weather is nice. On the weeks the kids have gym class, no recess is allowed.

It's terrible. Kids need to move. So we do a LOT of dancing in my class. I bring in the Wii and we do the Just Dance games. And other fun, movement based activities. I've found that when the kids need a break, five minutes of this will do wonders for their concentration and behavior.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 06:49 PM
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reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Tell you what, is it possible that you, and the other 4th grader teacher can give us scans of all pages of the CCSS books that you have to use, and then we can see for ourselves and decide for ourselves?

The problem is, many teachers might agree with much that is in these CCSS, and might not see anything wrong with it. After all, we have seen videos in these same forums of teachers imparting into children for example to idolize Obama, and to the teachers, and the schools there was nothing wrong with this.

I am not saying you are like this, but the fact is we don't really know you, except what you post in these forums, and your views sometimes do tend to lean to the left, so there is always the possibility that you might think there is nothing wrong with what the CCSS are teaching.

The contents of the books might change, but as a teacher you should know that there are many ways to convey ideas, and even indoctrinate.

BTW, I am not trying to instult you or anything. I am just the kind of person that likes to see things myself instead of just be told what someone else sees.

edit on 25-5-2013 by ElectricUniverse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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reply to post by Tarzan the apeman.
 


Social engineering has done more to ruin decades of solid education than anything or any one person could have ever done.

It's become the "norm" to think of schools as the end-all be-all to authority for our children.

In my humble opinion. . .



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 07:42 PM
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Originally posted by ElectricUniverse
reply to post by smyleegrl
 


Tell you what, is it possible that you, and the other 4th grader teacher can give us scans of all pages of the CCSS books that you have to use, and then we can see for ourselves and decide for ourselves?

The problem is, many teachers might agree with much that is in these CCSS, and might not see anything wrong with it. After all, we have seen videos in these same forums of teachers imparting into children for example to idolize Obama, and to the teachers, and the schools there was nothing wrong with this.

I am not saying you are like this, but the fact is we don't really know you, except what you post in these forums, and your views sometimes do tend to lean to the left, so there is always the possibility that you might think there is nothing wrong with what the CCSS are teaching.

The contents of the books might change, but as a teacher you should know that there are many ways to convey ideas, and even indoctrinate.

BTW, I am not trying to instult you or anything. I am just the kind of person that likes to see things myself instead of just be told what someone else sees.

edit on 25-5-2013 by ElectricUniverse because: (no reason given)


You didn't offend me, no worries. But I still don't think you understand that we don't have to use ANY CC books to teach. My county hasn't adopted new books in a few years, since before the CC started. No one is giving us books and saying "Use these."

I don't have access to my computer right now (I'm on my iPad) but I will be happy to post a days worth of lesson plans for you to see. If I haven't done it by Monday, please U2U me. I forget things sometimes. Bear in mind I teach first grade.

I don't really use textbooks at all. In reading lessons, I use trade books (like you buy at bookstores). In small reading groups, which are based on the child's reading level, I also use trade books. So we might be reading Clifford books, for example.

In math I don't use books at all. Instead we use manipulatives to learn how to manipulate the base ten system. Lots of hands on activities, reading graphs and data, working with geometric shapes and solids, learning to solve word problems, the like.

For writing, we focus on three forms of writing for the year. First is narrative, where students write about personal experiences. Next is writing to inform, where they "explain" what they've learned or know about a topic. This year we had them write about the moon and why it goes through phases (which was taught in Science at the same time). Finally we end with writing about a personal opinion. For this assignment they had to write about their favorite game and explain why they liked that game. In each writing assignment, the main focus is getting the children to explain their thinking and back up their thinking with details.

In science, we do lots of hands on experiments (my favorite part of the day
). For example, when we studied the phases of the moon the students kept a moon journal. This was just them drawing what the moon looked like every night for the course of a month, so that they could see the phases for themselves. Then we did experiments in class showing how the moon reflects the sun's light and why it appears to change shape. This unit culminated in an after school activity (not mandatory) where I and a few of the astronomy professors from a nearby college brought our telescopes and had a moon and star gazing party one night.

For social studies, I also use trade books that address whatever topic I'm teaching. For example, when discussing communities and how families/communities are different around the world, I use books that feature stories from that country or culture. Then we compare how that culture is the same and how it is different from our culture.

Are you a parent? Parents have the right to view a teacher's lesson plans, so if you are concerned about what's being taught...ask the teacher to show what she's teaching. In my school we also have an open door policy, meaning parents are encouraged to come and observe a class whenever they like.

If this didn't answer your questions let me know and I'll get more specific. And don't worry, I think it's WONDERFUL that you care enough to want evidence and proof. I'm happy to answer any questions and concerns you have, just remember though that I can only speak for myself.
edit on 25-5-2013 by smyleegrl because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 07:55 PM
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what they do is to instill in the children the need to "indentify social problems and their solutions".


The real brainwashing is people like you trying to make everyone believe that nothing can ever be changed, so we should never even try and just accept the status quo of oppression.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 08:19 PM
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reply to post by CB328
 

I didn't take "their" brainwashing very well and I won't take your prog PC jobs either,When you lend a helping hand to traditional America I will applaud it ,but if all you offer is a sterile hostile message of athieistic hippy retread garbage,go pound pavement.
My resistance however is redundant the truth is floating to the top and the younger kids see it,then your metro-pipe dream rule will definately be lost,and so will my cold war atomic family values.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 08:57 PM
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Originally posted by smyleegrl
Speaking as a first grade teacher from NC.

By this I simply mean that the curriculum targets fewer teaching objectives, but you go into those objectives more deeply. So instead of learning a little bit about everything, you focus and learn more about fewer things.


Could you maybe provide us with a few more details? I read the info in your link and I'm wondering if English and math are the only subjects affected.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 09:11 PM
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Originally posted by Tarzan the apeman.
reply to post by beezzer
 
What ever happened to just letting kids be kids? You mean to tell me that in less then one generation that all of a sudden kids have ADHD. We called it being full of energy.


No, "AD/HD" has been around for many generations, just under different nomenclature. We understand it better now and can identify it and it's characteristics. It is much more than just "full of energy". Part of the diagnostic process is comparing activity/behavior with the child's normal peer group. Also, these behaviors must be present in at least 2 or more different settings, (school, home, shopping/playground, with parents, away from parents, etc).

The theory that is gaining more traction is there is a problem with the executive functioning in different parts of the brain of children with AD/HD, which has been imaged by MRIs. Depending on which parts of the brain are affected depends on the medication given, Ritalin/Adderol being given to those with all three components... impulsivity, inattentiveness, and hyperactivity (there are different non-stimulant meds for those affected by other combos). Ritalin/Adderol, in a sense, stimulates those areas of the brain which are more dormant, allowing the child higher executive functioning but just as importantly address the hyperactivity.

At this point behavior modification techniques will begin to take better, otherwise, left untreated those techniques actually damage the child's psyche in the long run, leading to other co-morbidity disorders such as ODD, CD, anti-social personality disorder, etc, which usually come as a result of the child just giving up out of frustration over the years. Then comes a much higher incidence of self medication, criminal behavior, poor relationship skills, teen pregnancy, etc.

Maybe you are confusing children suffering with ODD, CD, etc with AD/HD? Saying AD/HD doesn't exist is like saying Tourette's syndrome doesn't exist. It is a neural functioning problem that is very correctable, and in my humble opinion unconscionable to not address. But yes, over diagnosis is a problem.

help4adhd.org...



You had gym class and you really exercised. Do they exercise in school anymore? Do they even let kids play on recess on what is left of the playground? Doesn't it really amaze anyone how fast things are changing and how many new deceases and mental problems we all of a sudden have? I still think we should just be teaching kids the basics and let life teach them the rest.


I agree mostly. Physical activity is being squashed out of our kid's scholastic lives. At my son's school (a charter, and they have been flexible and great in most areas) the kids get a 15 minute recess just before lunch, then go cram down their food, and go back to class to sit on their carpet spots to listen to a book, and I'm just thinking to myself, "Are you crazy? You just fueled these munchkins up and then expect them to sit?? You're asking for a disaster!"



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 09:19 PM
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With all the adult retards i come in contact with every day, it is quite clear the standards that were in place before this were pretty dang bad. I personally don't think it is bad to have kids learn a responsible community oriented mindset.



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 09:28 PM
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As for the thread topic, those books actually promote and teach fallacious thinking. Appeal to emotion? Those books are setting those students up for failure. My logic professor used to teach english in high school. On more than one occasion he expressed the general lack of critical, logical thinking from his students. He suggested that schools begin laying the foundation for logic (formal logic!) in early grades. Those books take them as far away from this as you can get, "without getting your eyes wet".

But as some suggested, is that by design?



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 10:04 PM
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Originally posted by Bone75

Originally posted by smyleegrl
Speaking as a first grade teacher from NC.

By this I simply mean that the curriculum targets fewer teaching objectives, but you go into those objectives more deeply. So instead of learning a little bit about everything, you focus and learn more about fewer things.


Could you maybe provide us with a few more details? I read the info in your link and I'm wondering if English and math are the only subjects affected.


All subjects are impacted, including science and social studies. But social studies and science are grouped under ELA. check this link to see science and social studies.
edit on 25-5-2013 by smyleegrl because: (no reason given)





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