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High Res. Photos of Moore, Oklahoma Damage

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posted on May, 23 2013 @ 11:02 PM
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This is a photo series from Cryptome of Moore Oklahoma. It purportedly comes from National Guard/Responder people and looks right by the vantage points. It's interesting to see how the damage track was narrow in some areas and very wide in others. Also, like people say, total destruction in one spot and little or nothing, 50 yards away.

Photos of Damage Track and Overheads of Moore, Oklahoma

There is nothing with casualties here. They aren't those kinds of photos. It's strictly the physical damage and from the apparent position of a helicopter, flying the overall track at fairly low altitude.

Anyway, I thought others may find this equally informative of what actually happened down there for physical impact. It's quite a thing.




posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:35 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


I heard the news say it had the highest wind speeds ever recorded on the ground.

So does that make it the biggest tornado ever??



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 

Amazing stuff. Interesting how in this day and age we have the means to see the results of storms like this.


Also, like people say, total destruction in one spot and little or nothing, 50 yards away.

Because this kind of weather phenomenon vacuums the air from ground level up into the vortex. A Hurricane is a wide front, steady wind that blows everything down. Tsunamis wash everything away. A nuclear weapon would blast everything outward from its center. And a tornado sucks.

The longer it sits and spins in one place the finer it shreds the debris. Like a blender. Towards the bottom in the link is a concrete building complex that is completely turned to ruins. Mind boggling.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 01:01 AM
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Pretty incredible. It's always fascinating when I see the houses destroyed in the path of the tornado, and the houses in (relatively) fine shape sometimes literally across the street. Thoughts and prayers for everyone affected.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 01:02 AM
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reply to post by goou111
 


The wind speed of this one is being reported as just over 200mph..
The 1999 moore ok tornado had wind speeds about 300mph if I recall.. I think the news is saying it's the largest because it was reported to have been 2 1/2 miles wide at some point.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 01:04 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


Thanks for sharing these....but as good as these are..they still don't do it justice.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 01:27 AM
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I have to say, Wrabbit, those aresad pictures....the awesome power of that thing just makes you feel sick in the pit of yer stomach.....graphic warning of things to come .....



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 03:26 AM
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Great post and the high resolution really makes a difference.

I find it so hard to believe that people will rebuild in Moore when there is a high risk of this happening again being that it is in such a high risk area.
The images alone are heartbreaking.



posted on May, 24 2013 @ 01:16 PM
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Very amazing, yes people will rebuild, its there home. People arent going to leave Florida or the East coast just because a hurricane has hit that region almost yearly. We in the South and Midwest are used to these storms, we arent used to F-4 or F-5 tornados with a width of almost 2 miles though. But bad tornadic type systems are common, and usually only occur in very rural or farm land areas, its a worst case scenario when it hits a town or city



posted on May, 25 2013 @ 11:07 PM
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reply to post by Glassbender777
 


I agree. I live in Massachusetts, and even tho where I live we have been mostly spared by all of the last big storms we got, I know people love it here. And actually looking back at the past few years, we have actually been very lucky as we have had quite a few close calls with more hurricanes. I've heard they're thinking this year hurricane season might start early and be above average.

I wonder if there's any monitoring system to see if tornados are individually getting stronger/more common as hurricanes seem to be, or is it again the case that we are more observant of these things.




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