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Flood/Tornado/Earthquake proof home? Is it possible?

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posted on May, 23 2013 @ 12:53 PM
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reply to post by TDawgRex
 


I believe nothing will stop one from going back to your roots


Get a dome house!

edit on 09/02/2012 by KaelemJames because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 23 2013 @ 06:52 PM
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your post is a bit decieving.Flood/earthquake/tornado proof? You can't have it all! Underground would be the best,if you have a hill to avoid a flood.I worked for a company that made anti vibration stuff for microscopes,and we developed a plan that we sold to japan for buildings.Imagine a suacer shape,one up,one down,with a cannonball in the middle,all on a big azz spring.If the ground moves left or right,the ball wobbles and takes the motion,if it goes up and down,the spring takes it



posted on May, 23 2013 @ 07:20 PM
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The problem with housing in general terms is that the walls only have the strength to keep the roof up.

The best way to build a house is to earth berm it. That is, build the house out of re-enforced concrete panels, use the same but oversize for the roof. Minimize window sizes, ie don't have them all the way to the ground and then cover all the sides with earth. Make sure you waterproof it and cover the roof as well. That will protect against everything except flood. The flood will in all likely hood still get in but the structure will just need to be dried out afterwards.

What you are trying to do is to make the house part of the earth itself.

Houses are built to make money for those building them. They are not built to last.

P



posted on May, 23 2013 @ 08:21 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


your half right..more rigid structure won't be a gaurentee.It needs to flex a bit to absorb the shock.A blob of jello will last longer than a brick,as it will flex.How much flex is right,well,you guess!



posted on May, 23 2013 @ 09:00 PM
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reply to post by blkcwbyhat
 


I don't think you understand the concept.

If your building is above the ground, then it does need to flex to absorb sudden movement shocks.

If your building is in the ground, then it moves with the ground rather than opposing the ground. Thus the building is certainly shaken but it is protected by the earth around it. It should not have a need to flex.

P

edit on 23/5/2013 by pheonix358 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 23 2013 @ 09:05 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


darn,you proved me wrong.....too bad we sold the patent!!



posted on May, 23 2013 @ 09:32 PM
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www.google.com...://www.intershelter.com/&usg=AFQjCNENME_2XyAfw-5ga56lHtuXsXbtnQ

When the Intershelter first came out I was impressed. Their original video had them spray a compount on the outside of their already strong shelter and it made it ?? class lllA bullet proof. Their marketing is now focused on shelters for earthquake natural diasters. I can not find the original video but: www.intershelter.com... If three were connected you would have living area in one, kitchen eating area in another and a bedroom in the other instead of everything in one.?

Bullet Resistant Domes- As an option, add composite armor to your Intershelter™ Dome. Composite laminate used for the Ballistic Dome Shelter (BDS) is configured in a multi-ply configuration that provides best properties when ballistically attacked. The bullets are embedded within the composite armor panels rather than ricocheted (like steel or aluminum armor would). The bullet-resistant composite armor is a fraction of the weight of steel armor for identical performance levels. Tests show that ballistic levels exceed level IIIA.


Two or three of these connected together in an artistic manner might not be to bad if covered with sod and dirt?
.


Atlas underground shelter



If you look on youtube there are many companies and people experimenting with different building materials and many of their ideas a darn good. Some of the completed sand bag homes are amazing and can be built in any shape...Once the outer coating is applied it looks just like stucco.

I have a "much" to big of a house for myself and wife which we are trying to sell without losing a fortune and then we will be moving to the farm overseas. I have thought about a small self sufficient shelter with an off the grid set up...... but even at the farm with both air conditioners running the highest electric bill I have ever had was $46 U.S. so it is not real high on my priority list. But in the states if I were buying land and starting fresh I would seriously look at some of the newer type building styles. Good luck on whatever you decide.
edit on 23-5-2013 by 727Sky because: ......



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