Dreamliner teething problems continue

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posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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Fifteen airlines have been warned about the risk of ice forming on Boeing's new 747-8 and 787 Dreamliner planes. The issue - affecting some types of engines made by General Electric when planes fly near high-level thunderstorms - prompted Japan Airlines to cancel two international routes. There have been six incidents since April when aircraft powered by GE engines lost power at high altitude. These are the latest technical issues to hit the Dreamliner.


www.bbc.co.uk...

Story goes on to say that they mustn't operate within 50 miles of thunderstorms that contain ice crystals. And that JAL airlines have pulled their aircraft from a couple of routes due to this.




posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 11:39 AM
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reply to post by solidshot
 


A 747-8F suffered damage to 3 engines earlier this year because of it. There is ice forming where it normally doesn't.

www.abovetopsecret.com...
edit on 11/23/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 



Thnx, so what have they changed in these engines that would cause it to affect these in particular? Also only seems to affect GE engines? Rolls are claiming there is no problems with theirs.



posted on Nov, 23 2013 @ 11:51 AM
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reply to post by solidshot
 


The GEnx is a bleedless engine, so it's removed the bleed air system used to power the aircraft, as well as being a smaller core engine. The bleed air system uses high temp/pressure air, so even though it didn't go through the engine, it kept heat in the engine from the air being blown through it.



posted on Nov, 27 2013 @ 12:24 PM
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The FAA has formalized Boeing's warning not to fly into or near convective storms with GEnx engines. There have been nine instances of power rollbacks due to icing, with two not recovering higher than idle power. If an aircraft accidentally flies through a system (which doesn't show up on weather radar) they are required to inspect the interior of the engine (with a borescope or similar system).

www.flightglobal.com...



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:22 PM
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Boing announced Fri. that they have wing cracks in some of the wings that are now in production aircraft:



Wing-maker Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd notified Boeing in February of the problem, which arose after the Japanese company altered its manufacturing process.

"We are discussing with Boeing how to deal with the problem," a spokesman for Mitsubishi Heavy Industries in Tokyo said. He was unable to comment on why the company changed the manufacturing process.




The cracks have not been found on planes that are in use by airlines and therefore pose no safety risk, Boeing said, adding the problem also will not alter Boeing's plans to deliver 110 787s this year.


www.reuters.com...



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:28 PM
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reply to post by Sammamishman
 


It's only something like 40 aircraft still on the line. So it's a problem, but not a major one.



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Apparently not as big of a problem "yet" as Airbus had with it's cracks.
edit on 8-3-2014 by Sammamishman because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 8 2014 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by Sammamishman
 


From what I've heard not even close.





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