Dreamliner teething problems continue

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posted on Nov, 11 2013 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by Mikeultra
 


Generally the APU is only used on the ground. You CAN run it in flight, but it's only used to provide power on the ground while the engines are shut off. In flight the generators in the engines, and the electrical system provide the power.




posted on Nov, 11 2013 @ 04:14 PM
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Zaphod58
reply to post by Mikeultra
 


Generally the APU is only used on the ground. You CAN run it in flight, but it's only used to provide power on the ground while the engines are shut off. In flight the generators in the engines, and the electrical system provide the power.


Oh, maybe they were running it in the flight with the Qatar test plane video because they had lots of electrical test equipment on board. Earlier in the video you can see it's open while flying around.



posted on Nov, 11 2013 @ 04:17 PM
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reply to post by Mikeultra
 


It's a crew decision. Some crews like to run it during flight, some don't. They also will run it to allow it to cool down before shutting it down. It's basically an engine that runs while they're on the ground, so they'll allow it a cool down period before shutting it completely off.



posted on Nov, 18 2013 @ 09:21 AM
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Royal Brunei has had such good comments from passengers they're considering changing their plans with the aircraft and using them on shorter routes as well. Their original plan was to only use them on long range flights, but in use on short haul flights for crew training, the passengers comments about the aircraft have been good enough that they're considering adding 5-6 hour flights as well to their schedule.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 06:22 AM
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A Boeing 747 Dreamlifter cargo plane may be stuck at a minor airport in Kansas for some time after it apparently landed there by mistake. The giant cargo jet was heading for McConnell air force base in Wichita but instead touched down at nearby Colonel James Jabara airport. Local media report that the jet may be too large to take off from Jabara's 1,860m (6,100ft) runway. Boeing is sending a tug to the airport to turn the plane around, reports say.


BBC


I'm assuming they have more than one of these to take any disruption that this may cause in the transportation of the various components?



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 06:40 AM
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reply to post by solidshot
 


There are four.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by solidshot
 


Reminds me of this:

www.youtube.com...



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 07:29 AM
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reply to post by Sammamishman
 


Only this time they don't know of they can take off again.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 07:32 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I've seen these several times at Paine field and flying around in the region. I even got to see one at Taoyuan International Airport, Taiwan.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 07:33 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


That would suck if they had to dismantle it and ship it to a place they could re-assemble it and take off.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 07:35 AM
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reply to post by Sammamishman
 


They may be able to remove everything and truck it to McConnell and fly it out with barely any on board, but it'll be tight.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 08:32 AM
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They're apparently going to attempt to take off at noon.


www.buzzfeed.com...

About a third of the way down is the ATC recording between Giant 4241 and McConnell Tower.
edit on 11/21/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 02:34 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Looks like they got her up OK. Just saw on the news video of it taking off.

www.cnn.com...



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 02:40 PM
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reply to post by Sammamishman
 


I'd call this guy an idiot but that's too nice. Even with GPS, and exact coordinates it took a McConnell radar fix to figure out what airport they were at.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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I just saw a picture of this plane for the first time. Honestly ... I don't know how it can fly. It looks so strange. But I"m not an aero engineer, so apparently they know what they are doing. But man .. it looks too strange to fly.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by FlyersFan
 


Oh this thing is downright aerodynamic compared to what Airbus uses.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Going back a few comments Zaph running an APU during flight is there any advantages running it during the flight

The dream lifter looks insane I think I've found my favourite plane ha could they ever use one for Air Force one ?

And the c-17 that's just crazy. How on earth did they manage that made me chuckle



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 04:11 PM
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solidshot

A Boeing 747 Dreamlifter cargo plane may be stuck at a minor airport in Kansas for some time after it apparently landed there by mistake. The giant cargo jet was heading for McConnell air force base in Wichita but instead touched down at nearby Colonel James Jabara airport. Local media report that the jet may be too large to take off from Jabara's 1,860m (6,100ft) runway. Boeing is sending a tug to the airport to turn the plane around, reports say.


BBC


I'm assuming they have more than one of these to take any disruption that this may cause in the transportation of the various components?


So we have a dreamlifter, Kansas, Wi(t)chita
and a '9119' ft. runway.
Any other Wizard of Oz clues? I am sure there is something to
be found in the maps.

An interesting read on Colonel James Jabara. Sounds almost fictional, no?
And hot-shots with charlie sheen didn't come out until 1991, but the article was written in 1984!

Jabara stood out among his group of fighter pilots almost as much as if he really had been a Knight of yore on a quest for the grail. Veteran of over 100 European missions flown in a P-51 before he was twenty, he had a very hot start in Korea when in weeks he downed four MiGs, only one short of the total necessary to become an 'ace'. But instead of resting on an accomplishment in advance of any other pilot in the war, Jabara was worried about a ‘dry spell’ that had lasted almost a month. “He's a ‘Hot-Shot Charlie’ type...”

www.midwestaviation.com...

And I've just found my Wizard of Oz connection within that article.
See that Courage, Discipline (brains) and Emotion (heart)
are specifically highlighted in the article.

Is this all fictional? What message has been coded here?

Very interesting.
edit on 21-11-2013 by OneFreeMan because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by ThePeaceMaker
 


Not really, other than having it available quicker on the ground. Theoretically if you lost engine power it could provide power, but there's no real advantage or disadvantage to it.



posted on Nov, 21 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


www.news.com.au...

There's a few pics of it's take off here.





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