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Semper's Search for the Perfect Survival Knife Series

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posted on May, 22 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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Oh yeah

Cost is DEFINITELY going to play a role in rating the knives





posted on May, 22 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 





3. While many knives that people would call a "Good" knife now sport the serrated partial blade. I can guarantee that no knife with a serrated main blade would ever make top 10 in best survival knives. It is FAR too limiting on fine carving work which is essential in making traps, snares an other implements of survival. If that is your thing and you are comfortable with it, I say go for it but don't expect any serious survivalist to recommend one.
Ill put my carving skill with my kershaw up against any other knife. The half cerrated/half straight blade design is amazing.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 12:59 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Hardcore hardware out of Australia make a great blade. They are expensive but worth every penny.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:01 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Again, if that is your thing, go for it

HOWEVER

It is limiting.. You can deny all you want, the simple physics of the blade are what prove you wrong, not me.

Survival is really all about what "FITS" you, so if you are happy, hey...

However this series is about everyone, not one persons preference




posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


You are VERY welcome

After a lifetime of survival, I thought I would maybe try and give something back to the community along with our radio show

That and with almost 300 knives, I need to do something with them




posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:09 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Yikes, and I thought I was bad with swords, no contest.... :bow:



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:12 PM
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Originally posted by semperfortis
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


Again, if that is your thing, go for it

HOWEVER

It is limiting.. You can deny all you want, the simple physics of the blade are what prove you wrong, not me.

Survival is really all about what "FITS" you, so if you are happy, hey...

However this series is about everyone, not one persons preference

Absolutely, dont get me wrong, Im not saying its for everyone.

And I dont think anyone that hasnt used the particular series of blades that I am talking about would understand, because the serration on it is not the same as other blades.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:13 PM
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Regardless of the knife;

( I favour retired and reground sheffing type knives which can often be bought for $5 CAD in bins at hardware stores. 10 inch blade... they fit the qualities in the OP admirably)

After using a primary sharpener one can use the edge of a tempered glass car window as a steel, this puts a very nice edge on the blade, and if used judiciously can extend the quality of the edge between sharpenings, which extends the life of the blade.


Re flint knapping:
Window glass can have a very fine edge, and breaking windows is much easier to learn


eta
about serated edges at the grip end of the blade:
Don't do it!
(but if you must: the trick to sharpening them is to use a triangle shaped sharpening ceramic stick or file very slowly across the serations so it doesn't skip)

edit on 22-5-2013 by Danbones because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:20 PM
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I had to jump into the mix here... Lots of awesome replies and suggestions. So I feel like I should "Set" my go to knife on the table. I've been using it for over 10years, easy sharpening, light, and above else trustworthy. Nothing has changed on the design over the years except the sheath that hold the knife.

:
rum Roll:: ~Tada! SOG Seal Knife, my best friend whenever I camp, roam the woods and I sleep with It near me at all times, close by... But I'm not telling you where I stash it




A must for a solid survival knife is for it to be "Full Tang" as folding knives are acceptable in a survival situation you would rather a knife that will accept the full force you are using and not that a "Folding Knife" won't do that, I just don't trust nuts and bolts as they are apt to corrode and rust after years of abuse.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:26 PM
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I think there is case to be made for the folding knife, the fixed blade, and the multi-tool.

However, if I had to worry about space and weight over the number of blades I could carry; I would go with the multi-tool. Link to random multi-tool

Though I prefer Gerber mostly due to the how the handle is designed to not pinch the heck out of your hand when you use the pliers


With the file on a multi tool, with time and effort you can take a bit of scrap steel and make a functional blade. The other bits on it you can use to trim cloth to make adjustment to clothing, (turning pants into shorts for example.) Awl, screwdriver tips, and the like could be used in a variety situations. The hack-saw/fish scaler aspect could be used to help create shelter as well.

For a folding blade I'd be tempted to go with the usual Swiss army knife
Multi purpose use again.
Rando m Swiss Army knife

For fixed blade: I'd suggest the KA-BAR more on the lines of, it's a time proven sturdy knife. Not to mention there are a dearth of them out there, so the price will not be as steep as opposed to a Gerber "combat blade".

M.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:42 PM
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For me, a Leatherman Juice C2 as a small pocket carry, and a 5-6" fixed blade Bear, Schrade or Linder small hunter.
edit on 22-5-2013 by MuzzleBreak because: add schrade



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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I'm almost shocked.... That nobody said the Rambo Knives~



Seriously though.....
Nahhh~ I'm not being serious... I thought it would bring some laughs though



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 02:01 PM
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I have one of these, USAF issue item. The knife itself holds a great edge, is tough as hell and actually nicely balanced. The strap cutter/multi-tool that comes with it is great as well. It's designed to cut 'chute cord, but slices through 1" nylon webbing like butter. In the past I have done SAR and this knife is extremely well suited for the task...




posted on May, 22 2013 @ 04:44 PM
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I have found that a serrated edge is really only good for one thing, and that is if dont have a sharpening stone handy. The Serrations will help keep a cutting edge longer as opposed to a straight edge. But if you have the proper tools a straight edge is easier and faster to keep sharp all the time. So when i go camping i always have my sharpening stone with my other gear, so i vote no against serrated edges.

As far as learning to make a knife is a neat trick, but anyone that would lose there knife in a survival situation, or even a camping situation, is not to worried about there well being. As most know, a knife can be the difference between life and death, when i I am out there my knife becomes a part of me and will never be left behind, lost, or stolen. Just as I wouldn't leave my liver behind or lose it, I would not leave or lose my knife.



I still like the cold steel bush master because of the spear capabilties and the full tang hallow handle design, wich allows for storage space of other vital supplys. Its Only downfall is that it made in China, I myself would rather buy american, but this is a solid knife, diverse design, and only about 50 bucks. So the value factor is there and it is fun to throw.


edit on 22-5-2013 by DocHolidaze because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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Originally posted by madmac5150
I have one of these, USAF issue item. The knife itself holds a great edge, is tough as hell and actually nicely balanced. The strap cutter/multi-tool that comes with it is great as well. It's designed to cut 'chute cord, but slices through 1" nylon webbing like butter. In the past I have done SAR and this knife is extremely well suited for the task...





If they are truly issuing these pieces of Chinese crap to troops they should be ashamed of themselves. DO not buy one of these they are poorly made and ya maybe you got a good one but the next guy will not.



Cheap and good knives really don't mesh well. It is what it is. Save up and buy a Benchmade.



Also to the OP you might want to check out the Chris Reeves lineup of knives the green beret is epic. I love mine. And if cost is a huge issue the Gerber LMF2 I also own this knife and it is the best bang for the buck. American made.
edit on 22-5-2013 by SubTruth because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 05:24 PM
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I have a Gerber Bear Grylls Edition fixed blade knife. It is a very well built knife. American steel, very durable, whistle hangs from handle, diamond sharpener built into sheath, fire starter included that plugs into sheath. Overall I have been very pleased with this knife. Oh and for what it's worth it comes with Gerber's unconditional warranty.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 05:36 PM
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Originally posted by Christian Voice
I have a Gerber Bear Grylls Edition fixed blade knife. It is a very well built knife. American steel, very durable, whistle hangs from handle, diamond sharpener built into sheath, fire starter included that plugs into sheath. Overall I have been very pleased with this knife. Oh and for what it's worth it comes with Gerber's unconditional warranty.





This knife is almost a dead ringer for the LMF2. I think the only features it is missing is the glass breaker on the end the molle sheath. Also the LMF2 comes with a safety cutter and it also has a molle sheath. The molle sheath on the LMF2 also has a built in sharpener.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 05:37 PM
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reply to post by Christian Voice
 


i heard that Gerber recently started having the Chinese make there blades were as they used to be made in America now there only assembled in America. I have the version of the knife before the chinese start making them. no flint or whistle, but same size sand shape, also with a black handle instead of a orange and black. This one though was made and assembled in america some years ago, Im not a fan of the serrated edge, but since i have the option of both straight and serrated ive never been dissapointed.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 05:49 PM
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Originally posted by DocHolidaze
reply to post by Christian Voice
 


i heard that Gerber recently started having the Chinese make there blades were as they used to be made in America now there only assembled in America. I have the version of the knife before the chinese start making them. no flint or whistle, but same size sand shape, also with a black handle instead of a orange and black. This one though was made and assembled in america some years ago, Im not a fan of the serrated edge, but since i have the option of both straight and serrated ive never been dissapointed.




Hmm my LMF is stamped Oregon,US. Benchmade also decided it would be a good idea to sell out and offer a cheap solution it is there red box line and guess what happened no one that knows anything will touch them with a ten foot pole.



Good knives cost money there is no way around it.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 06:52 PM
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reply to post by semperfortis
 


Thank you, Fortis. This is great stuff!



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