The dumbest question posted.

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posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:16 PM
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Well, here in Oklahoma, we had a few tornadoes yesterday, everybody knows by now. A few threads have been posted about it. Where I live, we were lucky, Miami, didn't get hit, Wyandotte did, but I don't think anybody was hurt, just a few trees down and the power is out.

People keep posting things like "Why would you live there?" or "I have no pity on those who know this will happen and stay."

What is wrong with you people? Do you really think people have the means to just uproot? Natural disasters happen nearly everywhere in the world.

Did you say that when Katrina hit, or when Japan got hit by that Tsunami? If people relocated in the US because of natural disasters, we'd all be crammed into Alaska.

Have a heart, and use your brain, people!




posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:26 PM
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All i know is that Natural disasters happen, and unfortunatly we can no accuratly predict when and where tornados will hit. For some one to say that they have no sympathy for people who live where they occur is mind boggling and stupid. If people lived where disasters didnt happen where would we live? in the midwest you have tornados, on the coasts you have hurricanes and on the west coast typhoons and earth quakes, where does that leave us? some people are just dumb...



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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Yes I agree with you... but theres the other side of the coin also. Sometimes I look at all those people near Vesuvius for instance (and that probably extends to Naples) and think "well... you know... remember Pompeii? Do you really want to live near an active dormant volcano? And if it erupts could we call it a "disaster" or simply stupidity?

So... there are places and places. Some you shouldnt want to live in and some you shouldnt even be allowed to live near. But hey... I've been to Pompeii and it has one hell of a view, I give them that...

In your case I think people refer to the cycle of "tornado > rebuild > tornado > rebuild > tornado > rebuild > tornado > rebuild"... so, to be honest the first question that comes to mind is "why dont you... move?"

Its not that people dont have a heart, I think its a reasonable and legitimate question to be honest. I mean, you do know the cycle, the risks, and everything else... why stay on the path of a destructive unstoppable force of nature? Every year the ocean comes and sweeps my house... will I rebuild? No... I'll move.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by dave_welch
 


Glad to hear your ok, as for the nit twits just pass it over your head dave i used to get the same thing living in N.Ireland tut as if we can all leave are jobs etc and stick a house on the roof rack to move somewhere comfy yah right!!!!



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:34 PM
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Then there are the people who keep saying it was HAARP. Sorry, it's may, this is fairly common for us here. If the have an EF5 in Las Angeles, then maybe that would be a legitimate question, but come on, this is Oklahoma and it's May. We're going to have a few tornadoes.

This one happened to be worse than usual, but mostly because it hit a populated area. I've seen EF4 and EF5 tornadoes not kill anybody because they hit in a sparsely populated area. In the farmlands most people have a shelter or cellar, in cities and towns not so much. Why? I have no clue.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:37 PM
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reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


While i understand your comparison, it really is apples to oranges. With a volcano you know exactly where it is, using different methods they can predict with some degree of accuracy when it might blow. With a Tornado you do not have that, it takes certain atmospheric conditions to creat a tornado and you can not expect to know when and where they might hit. like i said apples to oranges.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:39 PM
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reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


Yeah, but lets be reasonable. It's very expensive to move, especially if you have a family. Most of us have storm shelters and the like.

If we left because of natural disaters, who would grow the crops, work in our factories, ect?



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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reply to post by ballymoney50
 


Thanks! North Ireland huh? Awesome, I haven't gotten to go to there yet, but I would love to, just to see where my family came from.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:41 PM
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Originally posted by crimsongod21
reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


While i understand your comparison, it really is apples to oranges. With a volcano you know exactly where it is, using different methods they can predict with some degree of accuracy when it might blow. With a Tornado you do not have that, it takes certain atmospheric conditions to creat a tornado and you can not expect to know when and where they might hit. like i said apples to oranges.


Thats why I said "there are places and places" - those are the ones you shouldnt want to live in - the ones with volcanoes are the ones you shouldnt even be allowed to live in.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:44 PM
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Originally posted by dave_welch
reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


Yeah, but lets be reasonable. It's very expensive to move, especially if you have a family. Most of us have storm shelters and the like.

If we left because of natural disaters, who would grow the crops, work in our factories, ect?


I dont know mate... I just asked the question. I dont have the solution - If I did, I wouldnt be asking the question



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:44 PM
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reply to post by FraternitasSaturni
 


By that logic, 80% of the US is somewhere you shouldn't want to live, and the other 20% is where you shouldn't be allowed to live.

West Coast=Tsunamis and Eartquakes. High desert=Dust Storms. Midwest and South=tornadoes, East Coast=hurricanes.

Choices are getting slim.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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reply to post by dave_welch
 


Dont forget the northern part i.e Yellowstone area that is just waiting to blow up in a giant molten fireball someday, also Alsaska the risk of freak blizzards I think that means there is maybe 5% of the USA that is still liveable and that might be a too large of an area...



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:54 PM
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Originally posted by crimsongod21
All i know is that Natural disasters happen, and unfortunatly we can no accuratly predict when and where tornados will hit. For some one to say that they have no sympathy for people who live where they occur is mind boggling and stupid. If people lived where disasters didnt happen where would we live? in the midwest you have tornados, on the coasts you have hurricanes and on the west coast typhoons and earth quakes, where does that leave us? some people are just dumb...


Uh that leaves you with sunny California nothing goes on here. No tornadoes no massive hail storms, and if you say earthquakes. I've been living here for 21 years and never felt one. The only thing you have yo worry about here is paying out the butt for everything.

But there you go there's your answer on where to go.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by dave_welch
 


your welcome anytime, pack a bag and bring the family



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 03:24 PM
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It's kind of a sliding scale. Yes, disasters can happen anywhere, and it isn't that easy to relocate. However, when you see people build on the beach, have a hurricane come through and wipe the siding off the building, then see them rebuild in the same place, you have to wonder.

It's like people building a nice house on a flood plain. That valley was made by the river flooding, right? That's why the land is flat, because that little river meandering through the valley floods every so often, and no one has done anything about it. There aren't any levies, so there's a pretty good chance it's going to happen again, maybe next year, maybe in a hundred years. Who knows? But when it happens you will expect everyone to bail you out because you were in a disaster.

So you play the odds and take your chances. The nation as a whole may come to consensus that not living in California because it might fall into the ocean is not a reasonable decision to make, but building on a sand spit on the ocean is pretty damn stupid. People will move the bar here one way or another depending on their needs and willingness to assume risk.

For my part I think living in Florida in general is not all that risky and is a reasonable decision to make. Building on the beach is not. YMMV.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by TheLotLizard
 


With that being said, i have lived in Kansas for 28 years, right in the heart of tornado alley and have never been effected by a tornado. so by your logic every one should move to Kansas. just saying



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 03:45 PM
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reply to post by TheLotLizard
 


California has it share of volcanoes, and with it being a seismic area i will not be surprised if one of those volcanoes blow soon, As beautiful as Northern Cali is I would suggest moving if you live near any of the volcanoes. With the drought they have been having lately there also has been a lot of wildfires, which not only destroys life but damages health and well being. And now California has radiation floating over from japan. Ive noticed that cali has stayed relatively safe from disaster for a long time, as you previously mentioned, which means that something is coming sooner rather than later



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 03:51 PM
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reply to post by dave_welch
 


In all fairness...just look at the tiny areas that get over 15 tornadoes per year....



I have to think there are other nearby possibilities that aren't in these little red zones.

I do get that it takes money to relocate, but by the same token, builders in these areas should really consider the necessity of storm shelters, especially for schools and other public buildings.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 04:34 PM
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reply to post by dave_welch
 


Well considering there are some areas where this happens often, maybe not to this extent.. I would think after having your home wrecked you may want to relocate... considering it CAN happen again .



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 05:25 PM
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Originally posted by Gazrok
reply to post by dave_welch
 


In all fairness...just look at the tiny areas that get over 15 tornadoes per year....



I have to think there are other nearby possibilities that aren't in these little red zones.

I do get that it takes money to relocate, but by the same token, builders in these areas should really consider the necessity of storm shelters, especially for schools and other public buildings.


Building codes in those areas really need to be updated, I recently read that 85% of the homes that were utterly destroyed could have been retrofitted and saved. These same standards work in places like Florida and the buildings survive.

But hey people gonna build on fault lines too...





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