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Storm Shelter?

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posted on May, 21 2013 @ 01:36 PM
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Obviously, the recent tornado disasters have gotten me thinking....

Found this:
thelifesavershelters.com...

Neat idea, and plenty of others like it, some fiberglass, some concrete, etc. But, we have hurricanes here, and they often spawn tornadoes. Of course, we rarely see more than an F3 here. Still though, I thought of another application of this, for a SHTF scenario. Basically, same function as a spiderhole (albeit slightly more comfortable).

The bandit thread got me thinking of how to best protect the women (and their virtue and sanity) of my household should a large bandit horde threaten after a SHTF scenario. Smaller groups we could handle, but a large and organized group...the best bet may be to hide them. Put one of these hidden somewhere on the property, and there you go. (and disguise the entrance, of course). Granted, could just run away too, but I do like the added idea of the tornado protection.




posted on May, 21 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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Two words - Mobile. Homes.If the area is that great you don't want to leave - besides the occasional tornado that could level your home - you get a home that you can move out of the way of such dangers. You certainly shouldn't be asking for tax payer's assistance to build a similar home in exactly the same place.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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Originally posted by IvanAstikov
Two words - Mobile. Homes.If the area is that great you don't want to leave - besides the occasional tornado that could level your home - you get a home that you can move out of the way of such dangers. You certainly shouldn't be asking for tax payer's assistance to build a similar home in exactly the same place.


You can't always out run a tornado. The Joplin tornado turned formed in like 5 mins.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 01:53 PM
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I think every school in the Tornado beltway NEEDS to have underground shelters. Cost might be an issue since most are small towns. Something has to be done to protect them.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 01:57 PM
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I've been thinking of making a storm shelter addition to the house. I can use it as the basement of an attached greenhouse/summer kitchen. It would require a floating 8 inch thick reinforced and rodded slab for the ceiling of the basement. Ten by twelve would be big enough for the greenhouse above. We have a safe area but it would suck to be in there for a day waiting to get dug out. I'd rather have a room with nice tiled floor, lights and some sort of heat and a sofa and table. Sort of like a small efficiency apartment. I could keep my food pantry in it also.

Sucks that we have to start thinking of these things nowadays, years ago we did not have to worry about the weather up here much other than snow. The winds have been much stronger the last three years, I have lost many trees. We have lost power for longer intervals than we have since I lived here too.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 01:59 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


Hi gaz

I seen the damage on the news, so much damage, it looked like the aftermath of an explosion
Although im in England, I can feel the sorrow from over the pond, and especially when it comes to innocent children.

I cant help but thinking that an underground shelter in the school may have saved them.

Im going by old movies such as the wizard of oz.
Sorry for my ignorence im british and we dont have to plan such things yet, but i watched the coverage in the early hours and seen the destruction, and could not imagine this in britain

All my respects to those that suffered, i count my blessings.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by errck
 


I fully agree with you!
Perhaps after this tragedy they will consider at least adding storm shelters to the schools.
Every school should have one.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:04 PM
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The missus mentioned that surely it should be a basic planning requirement in areas that suffer big tornado's to have some sort of shelter suitable even if its a group shelter between several houses and a cheap thing would probably be a simple hole with a well secured set of doors costing not a lot



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:06 PM
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Originally posted by WaterBottle

Originally posted by IvanAstikov
Two words - Mobile. Homes.If the area is that great you don't want to leave - besides the occasional tornado that could level your home - you get a home that you can move out of the way of such dangers. You certainly shouldn't be asking for tax payer's assistance to build a similar home in exactly the same place.


You can't always out run a tornado. The Joplin tornado turned formed in like 5 mins.


You've still got more chance of outrunning it than if you were in a timber or brick home.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:20 PM
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reply to post by IvanAstikov
 


Apparently you have never been in a tornado. If you have no basement, the best place to be is in your bathroom or the most central room in the house.

Those who try to outrun them are usually the first ones dead.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:22 PM
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reply to post by dave_welch
 


Preferably in the tub with a mattress over you. (we only had to do this once, years ago during a hurricane, and one did touch down close to us, though briefly).

As for school shelters....here's the FEMA map for tornado activity.
I'm sorry, but if in a really red area, those schools need to have shelters. Of course, I can't imagine what parents would send their kids to school, in Oklahoma, during a Tornado Watch, but that's just me....

Not talking about a lot of area here.....


edit on 21-5-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Maxatoria
 



The missus mentioned that surely it should be a basic planning requirement in areas that suffer big tornado's to have some sort of shelter suitable even if its a group shelter between several houses and a cheap thing would probably be a simple hole with a well secured set of doors costing not a lot


It isn't. They don't even build the shelters anymore as standard, like they used to. I'm thinking after this we may see some legislation for new schools, in these areas though...and plans to install some in existing ones, in those really hot tornado zones.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:27 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


I'd say the reason people send their kids to school during a tornado watch is because most of april and may seem to be spent under a tornado watch.

Tonado Watch just means that tornadoes are possible, a Tornado Warning means that one is actually on the ground.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:30 PM
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reply to post by IvanAstikov
 


I think there is something that attracts tornadoes to large collections of sheet metal (like trailer parks), as these always seem to be where they touch down, and utterly destroy everything...

Personally, if I were in those areas, I think I'd have built a brick or concrete block/rebar home with a storm cellar under the home. You may lose the roof, but you'll live, and have less to fix.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by dave_welch
 



I'd say the reason people send their kids to school during a tornado watch is because most of april and may seem to be spent under a tornado watch.


Granted, but recently, there has been a lot of activity in the area, but yeah, I see your point.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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i just moved from wichita ks, last year i had a tornado 5 miles from my house. that was enough for me, when i opened the door and felt the pressure drop and my ears started popping i slammed the door and got my family in the bathroom and waited under a old mattress for the house to fall down. after that close call i moved out to colorado on feb. of this year. what do you know where i use to live got hit again this past week.

so after that i am looking in to putting in a storm shelter/ root cellar. i haven't look much yet cus of money. i have tossed around ideas of building one out of cinder blocks. i was thinking of digging a hole and setting them in the ground and put re-bar and concrete in them. then i would need to install some sort of drainage system to keep it from flooding. i think i can make it for under $500,gust a guess, if i do all the work my self.

it seems to me that when you get in to store bought storm shelters they are over priced. they can get away with it by saying " you cant put a price on your families safety". yeah it would be a lot easier to just get one pre fabricated and drop it in a whole. it all takes money, and money doesn't come easy.





posted on May, 21 2013 @ 03:03 PM
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reply to post by NISMOALTI
 


The one I linked to is under $2700. Most I researched, who built their own, spent over $2000 in materials. For $400 more, the L6 has more room than the L4. (and I like that the stairs are out of your way)



Not too many worries in Colorado I'd think though....
edit on 21-5-2013 by Gazrok because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 03:40 PM
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yeah the cost of building your own shelter would prob be more. it would probably take more than 500 cinder blocks and i think they cost around $1 a peace. i looked at the link you posted and its reasonable compared to some of the other shelters i have looked at $5,000 +. still i am banking on Colorado having tamer weather than Kansas did. still i would like to have a safe haven just in case bad weather or shtf.

you know another option but not cost effective is something like the ark two. witch has 42 buried school buses. its interesting to look at. check it out

Ark Two link

here is a map of the bunker this guy made




this idea is taking a storm shelter to the ex stream, more like a fall out shelter but on a smaller level it would work for a storm shelter.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 06:33 PM
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reply to post by Gazrok
 


The reason that seems so is because trailer parks are usually on a large, flat, piece of land. Flatlands are prime areas for tornado damage. I grew up in a trailer, but we weren't in a trailer park, we had our own land and were in a valley, never lost a house to a tornado.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 09:34 PM
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If i was building a house i would install a 1000 Gallon Plastic Septic Tank under the concrete slab with the covers coming up into the house.

Cheap at $900
www.plastic-mart.com...
And you could cram 6+ adults in for a short time.

Even people living in Mobile homes could bury one next to the mobile home and put a slab over it with a small shed to keep the rain out for less then $2000.

Is $2000 worth saving your life



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