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first 3D-printed gun with a rifled barrel printed on a $1,700 printer

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posted on May, 20 2013 @ 03:27 PM
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Well an engineer from Wisconson made a better 3-d printed gun it was printed ona LulzBot AO-101 3D printer ($1,725), with about $25 of conventional ABS plastic.

The handgun defense distrubted put out a few weeks ago was on an $8,000 printer.

Dubbed the Lulz Liberator it has a rifled barrel and uses metal screws to hold the hammer in place, rather than plastic pins. The screws (and the nail which acts a firing pin) are available from any hardware store, though. Even though it isn’t entirely plastic, it’s still very easy to make.

It says the one he printed up using a more expensive printer and materials exploded the first sot but thecheap one survived 8 consecutive shots

I did not even know I could get a 3-d printer for $1,700
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Surprisingly, despite the cheaper printer, the Lulz Liberator seems to be even stronger than Wilson’s original Liberator. According to Joe, the Polylac PA-747 ABS plastic he uses is stronger than the ABS plastic used by the Stratasys. In fact, he actually printed a barrel using his friend’s Stratasys printer (Michael Guslick), and it exploded on firing. The LulzBot-printed barrel, on the other hand, survived eight consecutive shots






posted on May, 20 2013 @ 03:32 PM
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reply to post by goou111
 


I can't say this one is better. Actually looks a lot less functional than the other one. Also a LOT larger and that engineer apparently is not into aesthetics/ergonomics at all. I think the original was a much better thought out idea and better executed.

If the addition of rifling is what you are thinking makes this one better then that can easily be added to the other I am sure.



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


I really like that they printed it on a $1700 printer..

It sounds like that's pretty much what they did was improve on the original design and add a barrel..

But at 1700$ now, in 4 or 5 years everyone is gonna have a 3-d printer and be printing up guns lol



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 03:43 PM
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reply to post by goou111
 


Very cool. It gets better and better ever week.



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 03:53 PM
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Originally posted by goou111
reply to post by Vasa Croe
 


I really like that they printed it on a $1700 printer..

It sounds like that's pretty much what they did was improve on the original design and add a barrel..

But at 1700$ now, in 4 or 5 years everyone is gonna have a 3-d printer and be printing up guns lol


What I would like to see is an accurate rifle in .223. That would be a game changer in my opinion. Being able to print an accurate rifle for under $50 on a $1700 printer would be huge.



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 04:20 PM
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I would definitely,begin printing printers to sell them around 1700$.



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 04:28 PM
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You people DO understand that 3 d printers are just the first feeble steps towards a replicator.....dont you?
Watch the capabilities of these machines improe vastly over the next few years!
well be replicating what we need and simply payig for the software.....



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 04:31 PM
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Its obvious that its going to improve now that people are spending some time to look at it and go hmm.....wonder if i can.....

For each round I'd imagine there's a pressure value and once you can handle that then you can have a weapon in your wanted calibre....it might not be pretty or usable but it'd imagine that there's a plastic weapon for everyone



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 05:25 PM
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As a machinist,I'll toss in my 2 cents."a few weeks" to make a plastic gun.You realize this is made layer upon layer of plastic,each less than a hair in size AND width?It would take a day to make it 1mm thicker.The code would be miles long,assuming you have the cad cam program to run it,and your puter didn't crash.That software is about 15k.Then you need to learn it.
Then the rifling....well,its plastic,so it will last 1 shot.Then you have ABS plastic,which won't care for the heat.And the pressure will eventually wear out the chamber......
I can make it better with a hunk of water pipe and an hour of work....



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 01:10 PM
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The current crop of 3d printers are just the apetizers - but the technology just doesn't support the level of detail that replicators (I assume you're talking "Star Trek Replicators") require.

*THAT* generation of on-demand-manufacturing devices will most likely work by way of perturbations of the quantum foam, to cause virtual particles to manifest in the specific patterns required to become physical objects.



Originally posted by stirling
You people DO understand that 3 d printers are just the first feeble steps towards a replicator.....dont you?
Watch the capabilities of these machines improe vastly over the next few years!
well be replicating what we need and simply payig for the software.....

edit on 21-5-2013 by theGleep because: fixed a wrong word



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:08 PM
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reply to post by blkcwbyhat
 


Gotta laugh at the people freaked out about a printed plastic tube when one can take a block of wood and a rock and make a functioning gun.

I get that 3d printing is a stepping stone to something greater.

What I dont get is the horror so many display at the "Liberator." It's as if the very notion of the "zip" gun simply never occurred to millions of people until now.



posted on May, 21 2013 @ 02:30 PM
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My problem with 3d guns is determining who would be in more danger?
The guy holding the 3d printed gun or the guy that the gun is pointing at or both?

How safe are these things and how likely are they to blow up in your hand?

edit on 21-5-2013 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



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