1000-year-old coins found in Northern Territory may rewrite Australian history.

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posted on May, 21 2013 @ 11:35 PM
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reply to post by Spider879
 


Those coins are beautiful and have Arabic script. That should be easy to translate and thus indicate the exact source, time and society that they came from.

Why so little information? Academia has held our knowledge of human history hostage.




posted on May, 21 2013 @ 11:47 PM
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Originally posted by Astyanax
reply to post by Spider879
 


Thanks I could have made the title 1000 yr old African coins Discovered in Australia but that would take away from the fun I believe the writer was going for...

...not to mention revealing your secret agenda to prove to the world that Africans painted the Mona Lisa, formulated the theory of relativity and landed on the Moon.


All the same, an interesting curiosity. Most likely the coins found their way to the Wessel Islands as part of some eighteenth-century pirate's hoard. From your link:


When Isenberg discovered the copper coins he also found four coins that originated from the Dutch East India Company - with one dating back to 1690 raising memories of those early Dutch seafarers that stepped on Australian shores well before Cook.


edit on 21/5/13 by Astyanax because: of pirates.

Hi ya Astyanax
But we did painted the Mona Lisa, formulated the theory of relativity and landed on the Moon everyone alive is a Kenyan.


What is not certain is were the coins found in different locations then brought together and reburied by the Aussie soldier or maybe it was some careless Dutch sailor losing his wallet that's why they are going back to take a look in July.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 12:31 AM
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Originally posted by antoinemarionette
reply to post by Spider879
 


Those coins are beautiful and have Arabic script. That should be easy to translate and thus indicate the exact source, time and society that they came from.

Why so little information? Academia has held our knowledge of human history hostage.






Coin of Sultan Sulaman ibn al-Hasan Kilwa, Tanzania 14th century AD This coin was minted at Kilwa in Tanzania during the fourteenth-century reign of Sultan Suleiman ibn al-Hasan. Imported Abbasid- and Fatimid-dynasty coins from North Africa and Arabia were used on the Swahili coast (east coast of Africa) from the ninth century. The first locally made coins copied their Islamic predecessors, and were minted during the eleventh century. These and later Swahili coast coins, such as this, have rhyming inscriptions and declarations praising Allah and hoping for the Sultan's happiness.

www.britishmuseum.org...
Not a direct translation I am afraid but praises to the Sultan,and the article spoke of Islamic predecessors which is another misnomer for they were Islamic why is it so hard for folks to think that African plus anything else have to be mutually exclusive of each other ,the Swahili were/are simply Islamic Africans like much of the Fatimids in Egypt.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 03:56 AM
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Originally posted by Xaphan
Less melatonin was required to protect the skin from sunlight

Pardon my mistake in the post on page three. I was on very little sleep and meant to write "melanin".




posted on May, 22 2013 @ 04:55 AM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


Im from Australia and I was defiently taught that.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 06:55 AM
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Originally posted by Sinter Klaas

Originally posted by smurfy
James Cook did not really say "terra nullius"... well he did actually, but it was because an Aborigine had stuffed a spear up where the sun never shines, and what Cook actually meant was that he had no feeling from the Arass down, and that it was misinterpreted.


Well, it's a better story than believing that us Brits, stole Australia from the Aborigines without 'consultation' at least there was some interaction, although not likely the first.


You don't steal land... You only visit it once and say it's yours... If any local would file a complain, then there could be a possibility that it's owned by someone else


Correct, I know about that, but the Aborigine put in a sharp complaint

The reality though is that it might well have been that the Aborigines had a social order and laws, Ol' Cookie baby wasn't about to ask.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 04:19 PM
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reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


I run a successful coin store (2nd generation running it). I have tons of Greek and Roman coins that are sold by the pound (And I mean literal tons), and much older African Primitive monies that are not worth a lot unless you can find an eccentric. Age does not mean value and Condition is always key. Also its very likely that it may have been intentionally put there, if I bury a few roman coins in the Grand Canyon and leave it for a few months and let someone "Find" them, does that mean the Romans were in North America?



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 04:23 PM
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Also,
reply to post by Spider879
 


An Islamic coin is any hammered Coin. Not necessarily from a Islamic nation.
edit on 22-5-2013 by KezigluBey because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 04:37 PM
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Originally posted by bigfatfurrytexan
Ya know, the whole "discovered" thing is really stupid.

If white folks stumble on land that has nonwhite folks living on it, that land has already been discovered, regardless of the late arrival of Western civilization. Thus, I guarantee that Cook didn't discover anything.


When civilized people discover a place where the inhabitants have neither a written language nor standard items of civilization-- the wheel, metal works, multi-storied constructions,--then it is not inappropriate to say "discovered".

Certainly the aborigines did nothing to "discover" Cook. His voyage made discoveries that were able to be confirmed by returning voyagers.

Neither we nor the aborigines have definite knowledge of how they themselves got there. So whether uncivilized people wandered accidently onto the scene , or were placed there by someone else --it's a moot-point. Therefore it can not be declared that they discovered the area, even though they were there first.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 05:36 PM
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Originally posted by antoinemarionette
Academia has held our knowledge of human history hostage.
Hostage to standards of proof, perhaps. Not too sure I have a problem with that.



posted on May, 22 2013 @ 09:38 PM
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Originally posted by KezigluBey
Also,
reply to post by Spider879
 


An Islamic coin is any hammered Coin. Not necessarily from a Islamic nation.
edit on 22-5-2013 by KezigluBey because: (no reason given)

Yes but in this case the coastal Swahili were Islamic.



posted on May, 31 2013 @ 11:39 PM
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Originally posted by Spider879

Originally posted by LadyGreenEyes
reply to post by Spider879
 


Interesting stuff! I hope someone will be allowed to do the research, and reveal the results. It seems that, too often, such discoveries are covered up, because they disturb the status quo, or some such nonsense. Wouldn't it be great if studying history meant for truth, and not to make this or that group happy?

Out of curiosity, are you familiar with any other such discoveries? I have read tidbits about stuff in Australia being covered up before, but it's difficult getting good info without buying a book.


Yes but academia all but put those on ignore so the presumption is that they are all fakes whether that's true or not,but this find drew the attention of an Australian scientist Ian McIntosh, currently Professor of Anthropology at Indiana University in the US,so that alone gave it some academic creds.
edit on 21-5-2013 by Spider879 because: (no reason given)


Glad it's getting the proper attention! Sometimes, it's hard to know what to think. Some claim certain things are "fake", while others swear by them. Those of us not directly involved have no way to know who should be trusted.



posted on Jun, 1 2013 @ 04:46 AM
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reply to post by LadyGreenEyes
 





Glad it's getting the proper attention! Sometimes, it's hard to know what to think. Some claim certain things are "fake", while others swear by them. Those of us not directly involved have no way to know who should be trusted.


I believe all claims need to be investigated if found to be a forgery then so be it but lets not ignore finds because we think it is preposterous,the conservative nature of academia at times drives me crazy.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 02:31 AM
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Originally posted by Astyanax



When Isenberg discovered the copper coins he also found four coins that originated from the Dutch East India Company - with one dating back to 1690 raising memories of those early Dutch seafarers that stepped on Australian shores well before Cook.




And Astyanax cracks the case. Coins were used in trade in Asia and elsewhere by bulk, that an older coin was mixed in with newer ones is not surprizing. Its an interesting find nonetheless but I would suspect they will find it was from a wreck/habitation site of the Dutch/Javanese. We shall see what the archaeologist find.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 02:33 AM
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Originally posted by KezigluBey
reply to post by ShadellacZumbrum
 


I run a successful coin store (2nd generation running it). I have tons of Greek and Roman coins that are sold by the pound (And I mean literal tons), and much older African Primitive monies that are not worth a lot unless you can find an eccentric. Age does not mean value and Condition is always key. Also its very likely that it may have been intentionally put there, if I bury a few roman coins in the Grand Canyon and leave it for a few months and let someone "Find" them, does that mean the Romans were in North America?


In the fringe world - yes!!!



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 03:57 AM
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Australia is a rather large island and a variety of ancient explorers bumped into different parts of it over the centuries (or millenia?). Portions of coastline were ultimately charted but it wasn't apparent that it was, in fact, a single land mass until the late 1700s. The Dutch were first to officially chart it AFAIK (Willem Janszoon 1606, Dirk Hartog 1616, Abel Tasman 1642 etc) so it was originally named 'New Holland'. Fortunately the first suggestion 'Eendrachtsland' didn't stick.

Considering the prevailing westerly winds it's not outrageous to suggest that ancient African seafarers could have reached Australian waters but they'd be hardpressed to survive in most of the continent and even more challenged to make their way home to report the find.



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 03:46 PM
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Originally posted by Pilgrum
Australia is a rather large island and a variety of ancient explorers bumped into different parts of it over the centuries (or millenia?). Portions of coastline were ultimately charted but it wasn't apparent that it was, in fact, a single land mass until the late 1700s. The Dutch were first to officially chart it AFAIK (Willem Janszoon 1606, Dirk Hartog 1616, Abel Tasman 1642 etc) so it was originally named 'New Holland'. Fortunately the first suggestion 'Eendrachtsland' didn't stick.

Considering the prevailing westerly winds it's not outrageous to suggest that ancient African seafarers could have reached Australian waters but they'd be hardpressed to survive in most of the continent and even more challenged to make their way home to report the find.



I'd agree and point out that people from north of Australia (not Australia) did make it to Madagascar.
edit on 2/6/13 by Hanslune because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 6 2013 @ 12:15 AM
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FWIW, my ancestor an expedition to Northern Australia, in 1699 to be exact. en.wikipedia.org... He actually made some very detailed journals of the expedition.

He was essentially a pirate that ended up getting hired by the King to travel and chart out various parts of the world. I have two of the books he wrote here at my house and my father has the rest of his writings. It'd be worth going through them to see if there's anything that could be linked to the coins.

I know he circumnavigated the globe 3 times and spent his life at sea, running the gamut from trading, scientific research, plundering, charting, exploring, etc.

Just found this site with a lot of info regarding his travel to the area and exactly what areas. I'm falling asleep typing this, so I don't have the strength to read through it all, but I'm anxious to get back to this as soon as I can!!
www.pacificislandtravel.com...



posted on Jun, 6 2013 @ 12:45 AM
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Originally posted by Drucifer
FWIW, my ancestor an expedition to Northern Australia, in 1699 to be exact. en.wikipedia.org... He actually made some very detailed journals of the expedition.

He was essentially a pirate that ended up getting hired by the King to travel and chart out various parts of the world. I have two of the books he wrote here at my house and my father has the rest of his writings. It'd be worth going through them to see if there's anything that could be linked to the coins.

I know he circumnavigated the globe 3 times and spent his life at sea, running the gamut from trading, scientific research, plundering, charting, exploring, etc.

Just found this site with a lot of info regarding his travel to the area and exactly what areas. I'm falling asleep typing this, so I don't have the strength to read through it all, but I'm anxious to get back to this as soon as I can!!
www.pacificislandtravel.com...


Waay Kool I hope you share with the rest of us,better yet I hear a book deal.. I have a colorful ancestor of my own but much is not in print just family lore but he was part of the Western Maroons





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