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The 100th Monkey Effect in Humans

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posted on May, 20 2013 @ 01:13 AM
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Have you ever seen a single persons behaviour replicated by a few, before spreading like wildfire?

We have all heard the single "Jerry Jerry" and "USA" chants started by one individual before it becomes a massive chorus, but what other examples do you know about?

First of all - Here is a video that documents "The 100th Monkey Effect"



Here are three good examples that I like. Have you got a favorite? If so please post.

Here one persons laughter spreads throughout the train.


Next up - One mans crazy dancing gets the crowd rocking.


And lastly - "It was Disability Awareness day and the folks at Fenway did a lot of great things for kids with challenges..here is one who sang and when he got nervous the Fenway Faithful helped him out".


All good stuff - Three cheers for Humanity




posted on May, 20 2013 @ 01:27 AM
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Originally posted by NeverMind2013
Here one persons laughter spreads throughout the train.

Next up - One mans crazy dancing gets the crowd rocking.

And lastly - "It was Disability Awareness day



These are not examples of the 100th monkey effect.

The effect is specific to the idea or knowledge spreading, while the new learners have NO CONTACT with the ones that already have the knowledge or idea.

Or, as wikipedia put it:

...the new idea or learned the new ability by some unknown process currently beyond the scope of science.

edit on 20-5-2013 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 02:18 AM
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reply to post by alfa1
 


This can be explained quite easily using the quantum theory of mind that I developed. If there is a hammer, for instance, and a nail that needs to be hammered into the wall...

The first person comes along, and uses his access to the multiverse to discover the future reality in which he uses the hammer to pound in the nail. In other words, the person uses probabilities and visualizing in order to put together the culture net that is in place regarding the hammer and the nail.

This culture net remains in place throughout time - until it is reactivated by another sentient being, and comes to life.

The problem with mainstream science, especially psychology, is that they don't give humans enough credit. They don't think that we have free will, or that we can create, which is rubbish.


----------

The monkey see monkey do is precisely the opposite phenomenon - in this phenomenon, a monkey will repeat what he or she sees another monkey doing without knowing "why." This can lead to outdated methods being used, or even irrelevant routines / cultural norms being followed.
edit on 20-5-2013 by darkbake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 04:48 AM
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Originally posted by alfa1

Originally posted by NeverMind2013
Here one persons laughter spreads throughout the train.

Next up - One mans crazy dancing gets the crowd rocking.

And lastly - "It was Disability Awareness day



These are not examples of the 100th monkey effect.

The effect is specific to the idea or knowledge spreading, while the new learners have NO CONTACT with the ones that already have the knowledge or idea.

Or, as wikipedia put it:

...the new idea or learned the new ability by some unknown process currently beyond the scope of science.

edit on 20-5-2013 by alfa1 because: (no reason given)


Re - Your quote: AKA The 100th Monkey effect LOL.

Got a link to that quote please?



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 08:04 AM
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reply to post by NeverMind2013
 
Many, many years ago when I was in my late teens I was driving down a long, dark country road when a car came toward me with their high beams on. I flashed my lights at them and yet they left their high beams on, half blinding me and everyone else (4 of my friends) who was in the car. Being young and easily frustrated as the car finally passed by I very loudly yelled a vulgar comment that I made up completely at that moment. Everyone in the car laughed and kept repeating what I had yelled (wont repeat as it may be against T&Cs).

Flash forward a few years- I am in a store and a couple of teens (I am in my 20s and pregnant by this time) pass me in the store aisle and what do I hear one say to the other? The exact same thing I made up that night! The phrase was so strange, so obscure it is highly unlikely that someone else randomly came up with it, so it had to have spread from the original group of people in the car with me that night. Forward a few more years- I've had another child, divorced, remarried and am at my inlaws house and they are watching a movie on cable. I sit down and start watching with them when what do I here coming from the television? The same unique , vulgar phrase that I made up so long ago.

I haven't heard the phrase in years- at least not since my kids left their teens behind as they adopted the phrase for a time- but it has always amazed me how something that was so vulgar and silly at the same time, and completely made up to boot, could have made the rounds as that saying did. I don't know if it qualifies for the 100th monkey effect, but if it doesn't fall under "monkey see, monkey do" it definitely falls under the "monkey hears, monkey repeats" category!



posted on May, 20 2013 @ 09:07 AM
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posted on May, 20 2013 @ 04:18 PM
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reply to post by NeverMind2013
 


well....there is yawning. They are known to be contagious. But my dog can be easily infected by a yawn (even fake yawns). So I am not sure this is what you are really thinking.

Then again...the "100th Monkey" principle isn't really represented in your OP very adequately.

Lets look back over history at instances where something breaks out in multiple areas simultaneously. I am unsure we can find anything like this. I am intrigued by the concept of bicameralism. It would seem that if bicameralism has any truth, some of the changes in outlook from ancient man to modern man can be more easily explained. Otherwise, we have become far more secular as a human trait. Is this a natural trait, or a byproduct of another of our traits, "culture"?

I am unsure. The 100th Monkey thing is interesting to think about. But I would be even more interested in seeing possible examples of this.





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