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9 Questions That Atheists Might Find Insulting (And the Answers)

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posted on May, 15 2013 @ 08:06 PM
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reply to post by AmberLeaf
 





"If you don't believe in God or heaven, why don't you just kill yourself?"


Ok even as a believer that is the most asinine comment to make to an atheist/agnostic.
I can't presume to know how they think, but I would guess it would be try to enjoy life as much you can, before you become a permanent pile of dust, with no hope for future life.




posted on May, 15 2013 @ 08:20 PM
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Originally posted by FaceLikeTheSun
If there is no moral law giver, then there are no moral laws. If there are no moral laws, then right and wrong are mere perspectives. If right and wrong are just perspectives, then they are simply illusory qualities that only exist in the individual. Right and wrong become meaningless.

So atheists...the question is:

How do you operate as an agent of morals when right and wrong are only relative to your own perspective? In other words, how do you know that your "right" is really "right" or your "wrong" is really "wrong"?


To assert that something is "right" or "wrong" is not to assert a fact about the real world. These words are labels that we apply as individuals, as societies and maybe as a species. They express our intentions to behave in certain ways and our expectations that others will behave similarly. Physical laws describe the way "things" appear to behave. Moral "laws" describe the way we feel people ought to behave. Nobody "knows" that their "right" is really "right", although many people think they do. In fact, nobody's "right" is really "right", unless we can all agree on how to define that term.
edit on 15-5-2013 by bigfootgurl because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 08:30 PM
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Originally posted by minkmouse

Originally posted by kaylaluv

Originally posted by RedBeardRay
reply to post by AmberLeaf
 


What an Ignorant response. "Believers" don't kill themselves because they believe it is wrong, and a sin, not because they are scared they might be wrong. Some of them might think they are wrong, but those individuals have a lack of faith.


Devout believers may not kill themselves, but most of them are just as scared of dying as the rest of us. I've always wondered why that was, if they know for a fact that a glorious heaven exists.


I too wonder about that point...If you are a dying christian, one would thing you would embrace your death with open arms and joy, after all you've said your "Hail Marie's", asked to be forgiven for your sins or just flat out asked Jesus to come into your life so you're off to the great Holiday Inn in the sky...Why would one sweat that?


Maybe for the same reason existentialists don't kill themselves since they think life is meaningless and random. See how that works?



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by bigfootgurl
 





To assert that something is "right" or "wrong" is not to assert a fact about the real world. These words are labels that we apply as individuals, as societies and maybe as a species. They express our intentions to behave in certain ways and our expectations that others will behave similarly. Physical laws describe the way "things" appear to behave. Moral "laws" describe the way we feel people ought to behave. Nobody "knows" that their "right" is really "right", although many people think they do. In fact, nobody's "right" is really "right", unless we can all agree on how to define that term.


Well congrats! You just described secular humanism.



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 08:38 PM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 





The guy thought women were the most evil thing in creation


Source please



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 08:44 PM
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reply to post by Nacirema
 





Humans are empathetic, gregarious primates


Yah humans are empathetic just like that Gosnell guy who in his empathy toward poor inner city women showed complete disregard for babies who were born alive in his death clinic.

That is a perfect example of the relativity of humanist morality.



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 08:55 PM
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Originally posted by ThirdEyeofHorus
reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 



The guy thought women were the most evil thing in creation

Source please


A History of Mathematics, Second Edition [Paperback]
Carl B. Boyer (Author), Uta C. Merzbach (Author), Isaac Asimov (Foreword)
www.amazon.com...

Most copies say the first even number was considered female and represented opinion and the first division from oneness (or the originator number, don't forget this is numerology in the most extreme case).

Pythagoreans later had many women in their ranks, Greek society had more of a sense of equality where genders knew their roles (not the equality being aimed for today).
Clearly I am exaggerating as to the most evil thing in the



Well congrats! You just described secular humanism.


OMG! HAHAHAHAHA I hope that is sarcasm I smell HAHAHAHA
edit on 15-5-2013 by FriedBabelBroccoli because: 101



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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I am 73 years old and a saved christian. Here is my take on death.

1 - I do not fear death, just some of the possible ways it could come about. I feel that to fear death is to show disbelief in God's promise and therefore to have disbelief in some of the core tenets of my faith.

2 - As a believer I believe that until God says it is my time nothing on earth can kill me. When God does say it is my time nothing on earth can keep me here.

3 - My feelings about death also tie into the end times prophecies. If you think about it, we all have to be born, live our lives in varying degrees of comfort/pain and wealth or lack of it. This is just as true now as it was at the beginning of time. That being said; I feel that I have a ringside seat for the most important and exciting times in the history of the world since Christ walked the earth the first time.

Even if you don't believe in a supernatural God, you have to see that the end times prophecies are coming true almost on a daily basis. All you have to do is read the headlines and the bible side by side. The most important prophecy is the rebirth of Israel as a nation/state. No people has ever been dispersed to the four corners of the earth and regathered thousands of years later until 1948 when, with the stroke of a pen, the United Nations recreated the nation/state of Israel.

4 - The rebirth of the nation/state of Israel also marks the start of the countdown to the time when all bible prophecy MUST be fulfilled. This is not date setting, just a limit on how long after the rebirth of the nation/state we have until all of it must come about. For my full discourse on this subject CLICK HERE to read it.

BTW - How do you know if you are a dyslexic, agnostic, insomniac?
ANS - You lie awake all night wondering if there really is a Dog.


edit on 15-5-2013 by happykat39 because: to add link


edit on 15-5-2013 by happykat39 because: added joke



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:11 PM
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I find this to be quite interesting.

If you are a Christian then you believe in the Bible.
If you believe in the Bible then you know that EVERYONE pays for their sins before they go to heaven.
If you believe in the Bible then you know that we are ALL BORN INTO SIN.
'Thus, .. WE ARE ALL going to BURN IN HELL before we see the Pearly Gates.

P.S.. .. On a small personal Note.. .. EveryOne knows that if you kill yourself you will spend eternity as a Servant.



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:12 PM
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I encourage all of you very strongly to read "Letters From The Earth" by Mark Twain, hell, I'll send you my personal copy!


"If you don't believe in God or heaven, why don't you just kill yourself?"

If I believe in heaven, must I also believe in hell? And also, I love myself too much to ever kill myself.


"Maybe this world is another planet's hell." - Aldous Huxley

Stow that away for a rainy day, eh?



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:18 PM
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why does a person of religous faith need to be TOLD to be moral? i find that kind of scary that they couldnt have the common sense otherwise.



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:24 PM
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I've heard of priests that end being atheist, and I knew a war vet how said he atheist back in his younger days, but talked about higher power later on in his life.

I believe atheists could be spiritually developed quite well, considering they lack the fear of god, and stay with reality too. They build their own strength, instead of a placebo effect.

Honestly if there is a God, it far from this plane. And if there is a heaven, then let heaven decides who goes there.
edit on 15-5-2013 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:26 PM
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reply to post by FriedBabelBroccoli
 


Oh Isaac Asimov has written the forward. I'll take his word as much as I'll take Carl Sagan's. It's doubtful Pythagorus was much different from all the men in that culture(except of course he was the founder of a mystery school dedicated to mathematics and the music of the spheres). Maybe all men were misogynist then....

Soooo numbers are male then....in the French language some words are male and some words female....and that is about as much sense as saying Pythagorus hated women(since that is the definition of misogyny).
And you seem to have an issue with Egyptian temple priests as well?
People were having all male clubs at least up through the 80's. I remember a club back then...an athletic club actually with big posh leather chairs and what not....why put Pythagorus in such a bad light? Without reading the book, sounds like some revisionist history, or at least a person with a bone to pick...

but here's a more likely answer than the selective reasoning of the authors...


Like many Greek thinkers, the Pythagoreans associated the mind/spirit side of reality with maleness and the body/matter side with femaleness.


www.nytimes.com...

The bible curiously states:


I am Alpha and Omega, the beginning and the end, the first and the last.

Revelation 22:13

biblehub.com...

I think the statements thus made about Pythagorus are made in ignorance of the subtlety of philosophical thinking.


hmmmm sarcasm? Maybe just an observation....
edit on 15-5-2013 by ThirdEyeofHorus because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:41 PM
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Originally posted by Bisman
why does a person of religous faith need to be TOLD to be moral? i find that kind of scary that they couldnt have the common sense otherwise.


For the very same reason that children of all ages have to be shown the way by a positive moral person. The educators of today know this, and they seek to mould the childrens' personalities according to the modern Dewey philosophy of everyone being cogs in the great wheel of collective society and the hive mind.



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 09:51 PM
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The second question should be asked to religious people:


2: "How do you have any meaning in your life?" Sometimes asked as, "Don't you feel sad or hopeless?" Or even, "If you don't believe in God or heaven, why don't you just kill yourself?"



Since you are hitting the jackpot when you die, why not end it early? Get an early arrival?

I know the whole suicide thing is usually forbidden... Doesn't mean you can't take up religious skydiving, jesus base jumping, bible biomedical weapons testing... etc...



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 10:05 PM
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reply to post by boncho
 




This is the best reply. Thanks for that.

How about Christ roulette?



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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reply to post by FyreByrd
 


if someone thinks that clapping your hands together and yelling at the stars give them a inner well being,go for it.Don't try to make me howl at the moon



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 10:41 PM
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reply to post by FyreByrd
 




3: "Doesn't it take just as much/even more faith to be an atheist as it does to be a believer?"

The answer: No.

The somewhat longer answer: This question assumes that "atheism" means "100% certainty that God does not exist, with no willingness to question and no room for doubt." For the overwhelming majority of people who call ourselves atheists, this is not what "atheism" means. For most atheists, "atheism" means something along the lines of "being reasonably certain that there are no gods," or, "having reached the provisional conclusion, based on the evidence we've seen and the arguments we've considered, that there are no gods." No, we can't be 100% certain that there are no gods. We can't be 100% certain that there are no unicorns, either. But we're certain enough. Not believing in unicorns doesn't take "faith." And neither does not believing in God.

Why you shouldn't ask it: The assumption behind this question is that atheists haven't actually bothered to think about our atheism. And this assumption is both ignorant and insulting. Most atheists have considered the question of God's existence or non-existence very carefully. Most of us were brought up religious, and letting go of that religion took a great deal of searching of our hearts and our minds. Even those of us brought up as non-believers were (mostly) brought up in a society that's steeped in religion. It takes a fair amount of questioning and thought to reject an idea that almost everyone else around you believes.

And when you ask this question, you're also revealing the narrowness of your own mind. You're showing that you can't conceive of the possibility that someone might come to a conclusion about religion based on evidence, reason, and which ideas seem most likely to be true, instead of on "faith."


So in other words, yes, not believing in God takes just as much faith as believing in God. That was a cop-out answer, and no answer at all. It merely affirms that it takes as much faith. The author tries to justify his stance by quickly switching to the topic to "most atheists," as opposed to atheists as a whole. Not only is it highly speculative of the author to assume he knows how "most atheists" feel, he also acts as if most theists don't feel the same way.

His argument that "we can't know for sure whether God exists, but we feel this way based on evidence we've seen and our experiences, but we still doubt," sounds nearly identical to how I, and many of my theist friends, feel all the time. The author throws in the somewhat crazy analogy of unicorns:god, without even attempting, or maybe even recognizing, the inherent differences between the two, most important of them being the physical vs. spiritual nature of the two.Thanks for the insight!
edit on 15-5-2013 by Ryanp5555 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 10:52 PM
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Originally posted by AlwaysWonder
reply to post by FyreByrd
 


My answer to the question is pretty simple. I believe in a god, just not the god the bible tells me of. "What" I believe is not up for discussion.

We all know what is right and what is wrong. That feeling you get just before doing something "wrong" is instilled in all of us.

I am going to stop here, as this is one of those arguments you don't get into. Fighting about religion gets you nowhere. Both sides have their reasons for believing in what they choose as religion. I just choose no religion and still live on the side of "good".
edit on 15-5-2013 by AlwaysWonder because: details


Not all, but most. You still have your psychopaths to account for, those with no ethical or moral compass and lack the basic ability to feel compasssion and empathy. They do present an interesting problem in the context of the First Question.

Ethics/Morals cannot be entirely physical/genentics because psychopaths exist. But it can't be entirely social/meme based either for the same reason.

I think most people believe that psychopaths exist - and use them for the example of evil. But then again, some psychopaths may behave quite morally by design and not inherent belief and/or feeling.

Tricky problem that.

I think one of the big differences betwixt beleivers and non-believers (and I accept that I may be very wrong in this but my limited experience often bears it out) is that believers tend (not always, not even mostly) tend to think people need to be controlled from the outside to be good. That they are born 'in original sin', so to speak and must be 'saved' (to use christian lexicon). Non-believers, again not all, not even mostly all, tend to think that people are born good and can grow in morals without outside control - by society or religion or force.



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 10:57 PM
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Originally posted by Phoenix267
I was reading this list earlier and I really enjoyed it. As an atheist many non-atheist would believe in misinformation about atheist and atheism and how we live our lives. Hopefully atheist and non-atheist alike would find something interesting from the list.


I like it too, it's why I posted it. Would you like to comment on some of the other questions? Questions 2 through nine haven't gotten any play.

We've gotten a bit off topic.



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