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Mayan Nohmul Pyramid In Belize Destroyed By Bulldozer

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posted on May, 16 2013 @ 07:41 AM
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reply to post by slugger9787
 


Yes you are quite correct. The digital age is spanking the printing industry and I am glad as it is a huge step in human evolution, books have finally been surpassed for the first time in 2000 years. Then there is of course the added bonus of the technology being much more evenironmentaly friendly. And for me personally the books I work on simply gain more value.


Asking if I have worked on an ancient Mayan codex is just silly and you know it.

Give my money to the church? Now you really are trolling

My guess is you don't even have a job. nah nah




posted on May, 16 2013 @ 07:44 AM
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reply to post by wiser3
 


you shout about your proudly african

you enrolled in 6-25-2009 and describe that as many many years ago.

there are a lot of ancient articacts in africa that need attention
more so than this pile of dirt in the americas, dont you think?
that might be a retorical inquiry.

this pyramid is being used to make a road.
what is the road being used for?
to connect two other actual pyramids?



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 07:54 AM
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That actually looks like an excavator that is leveling the pyramid.
Why does the article state buldozer when a bulldozer probably wasn't even used? I wouldn't think anyone would use a bulldozer for that. Hard to load a truck with a bulldozer.
edit on 16-5-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 08:01 AM
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Originally posted by slugger9787
reply to post by wiser3
 


this pyramid is being used to make a road.
what is the road being used for?
to connect two other actual pyramids?



The point is that your "pile of dirt" is someone elses "Pyramid"!

And, Yes, I am proudly African and I do my bit to preserve what I can when I can! I don't donate to the Catholic Church, out of principle I will never, but I do donate time and money to take care of abandoned and abused animals, what do you actually do other than donate money? If you've got the money to donate that's easy!

But now at I see you say "This pyramid is being used to make a road" Why has it suddenly become a pyramid while two minutes ago it was a pile of dirt?

As far as I am concerned two years is a long time considering all that has occurred in my life since I joined ATS but that's beside the point, you are nitpicking my profile which has got nothing to do with this thread!






edit on 16/5/13 by wiser3 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 08:01 AM
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Originally posted by rickymouse
That actually looks like an excavator that is leveling the pyramid.
Why does the article state buldozer when a bulldozer probably wasn't even used? I wouldn't think anyone would use a bulldozer for that. Hard to load a truck with a bulldozer.
edit on 16-5-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)


No, that's not a bulldozer it's a dirt pile.



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 08:11 AM
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Originally posted by LeLeu

Originally posted by rickymouse
That actually looks like an excavator that is leveling the pyramid.
Why does the article state buldozer when a bulldozer probably wasn't even used? I wouldn't think anyone would use a bulldozer for that. Hard to load a truck with a bulldozer.
edit on 16-5-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)


No, that's not a bulldozer it's a dirt pile.


Well, I suppose that the people were stripping the clay from soils to make pottery so they could trade pottery. They then piled all the waste into big piles. When the wind blew they had a lot of dust blowing around so they decided to make these waste piles into pyramids by lining them with rocks. Sort of like our landfills. The inner chambers were monitoring sensors like they have on our landfills. See, I can make up some impressive crap too.


I think there is something to the part about stripping the clay layer though. If you look around many of the pyramids there are deserts. Removing the protective clay layer would possibly help a desert to form. Some pyramids have a lot of clay in their construction, others do not. Pottery was big business those days. It was used because of it's properties for food storage.



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 08:29 AM
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reply to post by LeLeu
 


www.cisco.com.bz...

The road construction company in Belize.

The Government announced today that a contract valued at BZ$47,995,867.50, to be financed mostly with foreign debt, has been awarded to Cisco Construction for the upgrading of 23 miles of road in the Toledo District, from The Dump in Big Falls Village, located at Mile 14 on the Southern Highway, to the Belize-Guatemala border, less than a mile south of Jalacte.

A bridge, not included in this project, would still be needed to connect what some have called the Jalacte Highway to the Pan-American Highway on the Guatemalan side of the border—a project for which an Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) had been prepared in 2002 and recently updated, due to extended delays in implementation.

The two-lane road upgrade, which would span about roughly 28 feet, including paved shoulders, would complete Belize’s connection to the Pan-American Highway – a regional network of roads from Mexico down to Panama. It would pass through villages such as Mafredi, San Antonio, Santa Cruz, Santa Elena and Pueblo Viejo on the Belize side.

Pin-pointing the two main objectives of the upgrade, the Government of Belize said in its press release today: "When completed, the highway will serve several objectives and will allow villages located in the Western part of Toledo District improved access to Punta Gorda and the rest of the country. It will enhance our capacity for commerce and trade from our Central American neighbors and encourages the formal establishments of a second border crossing with Guatemala."

Funds for the implementation of this project were sourced from a loan to the Belize Government from the Kuwait Fund for the Arab Economic Development and AFID (OPEC Fund for the International Development), including the Central American Bank for the Economic Integration (CABEI), and counterpart funding contributed by the Government of Belize.

Apart from the road upgrade, a new bridge will be constructed to connect with the Guatemala portion of the highway from the Belize side.

www.cisco.com.bz...



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 08:39 AM
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reply to post by slugger9787
 


The company responsible for the destruction is D-Mar Construction, a company owned by the UDP politician Denny Grijalva. And looks like they're gonna be in the poop.



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 03:44 PM
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reply to post by slugger9787
 


The 20 page PDF report on the project goes into great detail about many aspects but does not, at any point, make reference to using piles of caliche. Or indeed of demolishing ancient remains.

It does talk of estsblishing three quarries to harvest roadfill material, but then only proceeds to describe, or even name, one of them.

Why this odd omission in an otherwise very detailed report?



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 06:34 PM
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reply to post by slugger9787
 



Instead, all you get is the irrationally emotive expressions of "save the baby whale" mentality, while 4,500 baby humans are aborted every day.

nice logical fallacy bro. i'm against abortion and killing whales. i also happen to be against the destruction of ancient ruins.

only a few percent of the jungle is explored. people say "we've explored the whole earth" but we've only mapped it from space. this structure was one of a kind, and irreplaceable.

unless you're arguing that the mayans used up all the stone in belize, there is no reason the company couldn't have found a different source.



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 09:16 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


ricky i pointed it out that they called an excavator a bulldozer
and
they called a pile of dirt and rocks a pyramid.

these people do not even have a grasp of the basic social competency skills and knowledge,
so
i have not been taking their opinion very seriously.

glad you notice the same things that i do.



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 09:25 PM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


thanks ricky
star



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 09:35 PM
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i am so happy to know that the rubble pilee was just debris left over from quarrying clay for clay pots.

thank you for the good information on how these piles got here ricky.

I hope the rest of you are relieved and can stand down in your emotions for the rest of your life about this silicon.

lelu is going to write a book about the "ruin of ancient ruins" and it will compel future generations to refrain from tearing down any and all structures found to be older than 200 years.

so they found out how and who decided to use this readily available and suitable grade of rocks for road construction now did we.

i suspect that some government officials are angry with the owner of the company, who is also in government and are using this, shall i say making a mountain out of a molehill.




to oust this politican for some other reason than the alleged ancient ruin, and since it was an ancient ruin, can we now call it a modern ruin



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 09:43 PM
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"Nohmul" is a Mayan word for "great mound". Doesn't mean temple or great place.

Frommer's 2007 guide says that the place has seen "crude excavation techniques, pillaging, and local agriculture" that have put a limit to the amount of preservation and conservation of the site that the gov't is willing to provide.

It has been excavated off and on since 1897, and road crews have been using the site as a source of material for several years.

Getting into the site in 2007 required permission from a local farmer.

The mound itself is described as being 50x52x8 meters. 8 meters high is about 25 feet--not the 60 feet reported in some news reports, and although that's the biggest in Orangewalk, it is tiny compared to other tourist site structures.

www.nichbelize.org...

.books.google.com... &ei=goOVUbbuHoXA8AStqYCwAw&ved=0CFMQ6AEwBTgU#v=onepage&q=nohmul%20belize&f=false



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 09:52 PM
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reply to post by MuzzleBreak
 


so there was and still is a lot of hysterical emotional people making a mountain (30) yards high out of a molehill (8) yards high.

that lie about the height does not surprise me.

i still think this is a red herring to get the political guy to back off something else.



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 10:21 PM
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Originally posted by slugger9787
reply to post by MuzzleBreak
 


so there was and still is a lot of hysterical emotional people making a mountain (30) yards high out of a molehill (8) yards high.

that lie about the height does not surprise me.

i still think this is a red herring to get the political guy to back off something else.


Could be.

Or another purpose we haven't yet guessed.

The gov't, the archeologists, and the tourist site operators have had more than a hundred years to attempt to do what they would like with this place. In the end, they all gave up on it. Left it to farmers, grave robbers, and construction material salvagers.

When a businessman finally starts putting that mound of limestone to really good purpose, the squirrels come out in force, all wanting reparations.
edit on 16-5-2013 by MuzzleBreak because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 11:01 PM
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***ATTENTION***

There is way to much bickering and ad hom's going on in this conversation. Let's return to acting like adults and keep the conversation limited to the topic and off opinions of each other. If it continues posting bans will follow.

Everyone is entitled to their opinions on any side of a topic without the personal comments.

Blaine91555
Forum Moderator



posted on May, 16 2013 @ 11:14 PM
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Originally posted by Blaine91555
***ATTENTION***

There is way to much bickering and ad hom's going on in this conversation. Let's return to acting like adults and keep the conversation limited to the topic and off opinions of each other. If it continues posting bans will follow.

Everyone is entitled to their opinions on any side of a topic without the personal comments.

Blaine91555
Forum Moderator


I would disagree. Ignorance can not be abated without controversial discussion. My comment rearding "squirrels" is clearly directed at those who may be seeking compensation--not against those who disagree with my postings.

Several folks have called me "Troll" or "Arse" on this thread, yet I was given 1000 point penalty for "guessing' that some of them might be difficult to educate.

Please don't stop healthy discussion just because some of the debaters feel that one side's facts are painful to see or acknowledge as truthful.,



posted on May, 17 2013 @ 02:06 AM
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reply to post by MuzzleBreak
 


I would just like to point out that not once did I call you a "Troll" or an "Arse" and I DID NOT report your post in which you suggested that I had a limited mental capacity, as a matter of fact I was quite suprised/shocked when I logged in yesterday and saw that that particular post of yours had been removed!

Suffice it to say that I still believe that all ancient ruins should be excavated and explored before being demolished in the name of progress, whether they be Mayan or Zulu or whatever!


edit on 17/5/13 by wiser3 because: (no reason given)

edit on 17/5/13 by wiser3 because: (no reason given)


editby]edit on 17/5/13 by wiser3 because: (no reason given)

edit on 17/5/13 by wiser3 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 17 2013 @ 03:32 AM
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reply to post by wiser3
 





Suffice it to say that I still believe that all ancient ruins should be excavated and explored before being demolished in the name of progress, whether they be Mayan or Zulu or whatever!


That's right, to destroy ancient buildings, artifacts or whatever just because they are old and certain individuals deem them to be unimportant is incredibly ignorant. The law in Belize says that destruction of historical sites carries a 10 year prison sentence.



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