Mayan Nohmul Pyramid In Belize Destroyed By Bulldozer

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posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:30 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:33 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:40 PM
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Here is more on the destruction


Doctor John Morris- Archeological Department
“You can see that this building was constructed in four construction phase because if you see in the left hand side you see one-third in the second level and the third level of at the top and then what you looking at over there, that is a vaulted room, you can see the curvature of the vault of the room on top. This is set of destruction of a building, this is one of the largest buildings in northern Belize and for it to be completely destroyed like this is deplorable, and we will need to take someone to court for this.



Doctor John Morris- Archeological Department
This particular mount, apart from being one of the largest structures in Northern Belize, is believed to have been constructed around 250 B.C, forming part of a ceremonial precinct. It is believed to have been either a public building or and edifice used by nobles or high priests. With an estimated 60 feet in height, this particular Maya Mount is believed to have been the focal point of other small mounts found in the area, marking the epicenter of the Maya settlement in Northern Belize. And while we may never know the secrets that lay beneath the layers of this edifice, what we do know is that a structure from the pre-classic period is being used as a quarry and the laws of Belize that protect all Archeological Sites, were violated.

www.ctv3belizenews.com...


Dr. John M. Morris is the Director of Research and Education at the Institute of Archaeology Belize. Dr. Morris has also been the Director of Museums in Belize and is also currently a Lecturer at the national University of Belize where he teaches courses in Anthropology, Archaeology and History. Over the last twenty years he has conducted numerous excavations and field projects in Belize. Dr. Morris research focuses on the organization of complex societies, socio-political dynamics in ancient societies and the formation of ethnic identity both ancient and modern. He is the senior editor on Research Reports In Belizean Archaeology, an yearly publication.

sites.google.com...



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:42 PM
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post removed because the user has no concept of manners

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posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:47 PM
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reply to post by LeLeu
 


so the mound, as the Doctor is calling it now ( has stopped being a pyramid) is not 100 feet high as originally stated but now only 60 feet high.

never fear, the destruction of this exact mound was predicted in the Mayan calendar to happen during the first week of May 2013.

looks like the ancient Mayans were not either alarmed or surprised that this is happening. we can all breathe a sigh of relief and wipe the crocodile tears from out collective eyes.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:51 PM
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reply to post by slugger9787
 


Wow are you trying to wreck this thread like that mayan temple?
Stop being a tool and get back on topic, you suggest that I have low intelligence but you have given nothing to this thread at all. I think you are the one who needs to go and educate yourself, or at least get your facts right.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:54 PM
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reply to post by LeLeu
 


It's good to know there are some who wish to take this serious and hopefully not feigning genuineness. I guess that depends on the wealth and influence of the owner, etc plus mounting pressure from the scientific communities.

Who knows maybe they'll hire trolls and scream its just dirt so others will turn away.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:58 PM
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Originally posted by slugger9787
reply to post by LeLeu
 


so the mound, as the Doctor is calling it now ( has stopped being a pyramid) is not 100 feet high as originally stated but now only 60 feet high.

never fear, the destruction of this exact mound was predicted in the Mayan calendar to happen during the first week of May 2013.

looks like the ancient Mayans were not either alarmed or surprised that this is happening. we can all breathe a sigh of relief and wipe the crocodile tears from out collective eyes.


I really dont care if it is a pyramid or not, or if its 60 ft or 100ft high. You are missing the point all together.
A 3000+ year old temple complex is being destroyed, and by the looks of it a politician is making money out of it. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks it stinks.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:03 PM
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reply to post by LeLeu
 


It hasn't been fully excavated and was explored extensively in the 70's ad 80's but much yet to discover. Perhaps at least maybe some we interest will come from this as they can see it from a different perspective. Kinda like a dissection hopefully a little less dramatic than a back hoe



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:03 PM
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Originally posted by slugger9787
reply to post by LeLeu
 


so the mound, as the Doctor is calling it now ( has stopped being a pyramid) is not 100 feet high as originally stated but now only 60 feet high.

never fear, the destruction of this exact mound was predicted in the Mayan calendar to happen during the first week of May 2013.

looks like the ancient Mayans were not either alarmed or surprised that this is happening. we can all breathe a sigh of relief and wipe the crocodile tears from out collective eyes.


While I find your comment a great piece of comedy, the unfortunate unfunny part is that the site was indeed an ancient structure.

If you look closely at the photo, and read the caption, you will see the chamber highlighted. If you look up top, the hole in the "mound" is indeed a man made chamber. Professors from reliable universities all agree there was something there. So I'm not sure why you are suggesting it merely be a hill.


Norman Hammond, an emeritus professor of archaeology at Boston University who worked in Belizean research projects in the 1980s, wrote in an email that "bulldozing Maya mounds for road fill is an endemic problem in Belize (the whole of the San Estevan center has gone, both of the major pyramids at Louisville, other structures at Nohmul, many smaller sites), but this sounds like the biggest yet."

Arlen Chase, chairman of the Department of Anthropology at the University of Central Florida, said, "Archaeologists are disturbed when such things occur, but there is only a very limited infrastructure in Belize that can be applied to cultural heritage management."

"Unfortunately, they (destruction of sites) are all too common, but not usually in the center of a large Maya site," Chase wrote.

He said there had probably still been much to learn from the site. "A great deal of archaeology was undertaken at Nohmul in the `70s and `80s, but this only sampled a small part of this large center."


Your totally overlooking the evidence in this case.




posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:10 PM
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Originally posted by slugger9787
reply to post by LeLeu
 


excuse me but that is not a pyramid.
it is only a pyramid to a hyperactive
progressively hysterical skewed paradigm.

it is a pile of dirt with a small hole in one end.
the owner probably made a lot of money
selling the debris as road fill.

someone is not telling the truth here.
it is not a pyramid. it probably is spoiling
the owners view of the ocean as well.

looks like monkeys lived in that hole too.

if you guys are so appalled then dig a
similar hole and go live in it.


Yup.
Pyramids and temples were built of rock.
This is a mound of caliche.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:13 PM
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reply to post by slugger9787
 


No one here is shedding crocodile tears just utter disgust that I have to share earth with low level conscious beings. Ya know what I mean there Slugger?



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:22 PM
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reply to post by slugger9787
 





excuse me but that is not a pyramid.


no, "sane" one,
it's what's left of one.

as for your query regarding contributing to the belizan economy.
methinks you have no concern at all for it either.
just the increase in your own bank account, defiler of graves.



posted on May, 14 2013 @ 12:09 AM
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Originally posted by billy565
The "GODS" are angry!

WTH is wrong with people? This pisses me off to no end.

The construction company can't find rock anywhere else in Belize? Are people really such insensitive money hungry lazy slobs?

I pity those people.

edit on 14-5-2013 by billy565 because: (no reason given)
edit on 14-5-2013 by billy565 because: I can't spell.




posted on May, 14 2013 @ 12:28 AM
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i am speechless...other than to say..that i am speechless...wait..




Nohmul sat in the middle of a privately owned sugar cane field, and lacked the even stone sides frequently seen in reconstructed or better-preserved pyramids. But Awe said the builders could not possibly have mistaken the pyramid mound, which is about 100 feet tall, for a natural hill because the ruins were well-known and the landscape there is naturally flat.

www.huffingtonpost.com...



okay...so there has to be more to it than just "filler for some roads". They wouldn't just plow right through a known pyramid in the area and say "oops didnt see it there"



posted on May, 14 2013 @ 12:38 AM
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Damn, that really gets to me. At this rate, belize tourism will drop considerably and I hoping thats exactly the push thats needed for this goverment to realize it needs to make a stand and do better at intervention.



posted on May, 14 2013 @ 03:26 AM
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The thing is, most of these mayan ruins are hardly recognisable any more. Many of them are entirely under wild vegetation, others have virtually fallen into pieces, others have eroded so much that they are basically dirt. The vast majority of them have had to undergo heavily restoration so they can be appreciated by the inexpert eye, which IMO pretty much defeats the purpose.

I would understand the uproar (and most definitely would share it) if the state of these ruins have been like the pyramids in Tikal when they were originally discovered (I saw some of the first pictures taken on the site on a museum a few years ago and the place looked out of this worldy, like a lost world hidden in the middle of the rain forest), but when they have lost most of its magic already I don't see much problem with them being destroyed (well, after a few archaeologists have had the chance to do a bit of their work on them).



posted on May, 14 2013 @ 04:27 AM
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No words to describe this terrorist barbaric act
idiocracy in is best


Please can someone stop this planet, i want get out



posted on May, 14 2013 @ 04:59 AM
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Originally posted by slugger9787
reply to post by masta12d
 


how much money haave you sent to
Belieze to preserve their cultural heritage.

it is called putting your money where your mouth is.

that is what i thought $00.00. am I correct.



If you had read the thread properly before posting your ridiculous comments you would have known that Masta is a Travel Agent and therefore probably has more effect in advising people NOT to go to Belize on holiday which would prevent alot more funds from ending up there than any one of us could send to Belize to take care of their cultural heritage! It's called a boycott! But you've had such an incredible education you must have known that right?

edit on 14/5/13 by wiser3 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 14 2013 @ 05:15 AM
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Originally posted by D3AD537
i am speechless...other than to say..that i am speechless...wait..




Nohmul sat in the middle of a privately owned sugar cane field, and lacked the even stone sides frequently seen in reconstructed or better-preserved pyramids. But Awe said the builders could not possibly have mistaken the pyramid mound, which is about 100 feet tall, for a natural hill because the ruins were well-known and the landscape there is naturally flat.

www.huffingtonpost.com...



okay...so there has to be more to it than just "filler for some roads". They wouldn't just plow right through a known pyramid in the area and say "oops didnt see it there"


You are looking at the third world. In many places like that they will sell off anything they can, tear whatever they can to get to 'developing nation' status. Belize is almost there I think. The ironic thing is once they get the status they have to have more of a conscience in regards to matters like these.

The world has been plundered many times over. Seems such a waste though when something like that is torn down simply for a road. No worse though, then in the Middle East when giant stones were removed from temples (the ones looking straight out of Indiana Jones) for boring, subpar contemporary structures...





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