God=Dog?

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posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:28 AM
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I'm just wondering and thought I would post here on ATS. What if when we say "God" in our worship of God, we are really saying "Dog" in our unknowing worship of the Egyptian God with the dog's head named Annubis. There actually were several Egyptian Gods with Dog heads not just Annubis but I that's another thread, Egyptians apparently loved dogs and even mummified them. You had to be pretty important to be mummified. Were the Ancient Egyptians visited by beings who looked like dogs, was it just mere infatuation with dogs, or was it something else?

God is Dog spelled backwards, and hieroglyphics are written right to left so it is an easy assumption for me. What say you ATS?




posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


It depends where our hearts are, God knows them.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:32 AM
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posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


I suppose it depends on which deity you're speaking of, considering there are thousands of worshipped "gods" in the world. And all of them seem to be recycled mutants from ancient cultures. See my signature.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:39 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


In ancient egyptian dog is written as such : auau, uahr, uher...

None of those can pe pronounced backwards in the ancient translated egyption language so to speak although maybe in hieroglyphics, i have researched a fair bit and not found any evidence!

Anubis is one of the most iconic gods of ancient Egypt. Anubis is the Greek version of his name, the ancient Egyptians knew him as Anpu (or Inpu). Anubis was an extremely ancient deity whose name appears in the oldest mastabas of the Old Kingdom and the Pyramid Texts as a guardian and protector of the dead. He was originally a god of the underworld, but became associated specifically with the embalming process and funeral rites. His name is from the same root as the word for a royal child, "inpu". However, it is also closely related to the word "inp" which means "to decay", and one versions of his name (Inp or Anp) more closely resembles that word.

ancientegyptonline.co.uk...

Egyptians didn't worship Dogs, however, they DID worship cats.

During the classical age, there was no other aspect of Egyptian religion that elicited more derision from writers than the aspect of Egyptian animal worship. Among the various cults established by the ancient Egyptians, it seems to many even today to be one of the most strange and mysterious. There is evidence of animal cults that dates back to at least the fourth millennium BC in Egypt, including predynastic ritual burials of animals such as gazelles, dogs, cattle, monkey and rams at sights such as Badari, Naqada, Maadi and Heliopolis. Erik Hornung notes that "the care with which these animals were buried and provided with grave goods is evidence for a cult of sacred animals".

www.touregypt.net...

The words God and Dog are English so of course you could come up with this type of conclusion quite easily!

Kindest respects

Rodinus


edit on 13-5-2013 by Rodinus because: Link added



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:45 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


Neat angle there, I guess we could see if that is the case by using different cultures and seeing if the dog/god thing is still interchangeable.
Let's use the language of say.....some canadians they say dog and god, and so do we in the US so it must be true!!
/sarcasm
Really?
Was this really a topic?



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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The word 'Dog' originates from the French word 'dogue'.

The word 'God' originates from the Sanskrit word 'Hu' which means 'to call upon'.

The two languages are not the same, therefore the words have absolutely nothing in common. A few simple Google searches can easily answer your questions/speculations.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:03 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 


We could probably find a lot of words that have another meaning if spelled backwards. We could even try to make meaning out of something that never had meaning before we tried to mess with it.

For example, what did redrum (murder) mean before the movie "The Shinning" by Stephen King?
edit on 13-5-2013 by StarsInDust because: It was Stephen King not Stephen Spielberg, I thought I mixed it up, kept bothering me.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:05 AM
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I am a dyslexic agnostic insomniac.

I can't sleep at night, wondering if there really is a Dog...

Tfw.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by Xaphan
The word 'Dog' originates from the French word 'dogue'.



I have to disagree with you about the origin of the word Dog Xaphan (although it can be a debatable issue!) :

The word dog appears once in Old English, in a gloss from ca.1050, rather late in the Old English period. The gloss reads "canum docgena." Initially, dog was used to refer to particularly large canines. The origin of the word is obscure with no known root in other languages. Several European languages have cognates of dog, but these are all descended from the English word and provide no clue as to its original provenance.

www.wordorigins.org...

Old English docga, a late, rare word used of a powerful breed of canine. It forced out Old English hund (the general Germanic and Indo-European word; see canine) by 16c. and subsequently was picked up in many continental languages (e.g. French dogue (16c.), Danish dogge), but the origin remains one of the great mysteries of English etymology.

www.etymonline.com...

However, for the OP, you might be interested in this :

Most of us at some point in our life have noticed that the word God, the Supreme and Infinite Personal Being, in reverse presents us with the word ‘dog’, man’s best friend. Given the importance of the title of our Creator, I could only wonder if they could be any significance in why the mirror imaging of the word should draw our attention to a contract drawn up between Man and dog, as remote as 10,000 years ago. Who was responsible for the naming of ‘God’, likewise who named the first dog? The plot thickens when we discover that the origin of both words is unclear, the exact history of the word God remaining unknown and the origin of dog tantalisingly one of the greater mysteries of English etymology having no known root in other languages. What might be the concealed connection? There are two possible ‘leakages’ within the religious spectrum.

More can be read here : blog.world-mysteries.com...

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 13-5-2013 by Rodinus because: Phrase and link added



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:18 AM
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Maybe God is a Dog and all the Canines on Earth are His representatives to judges us. And if that's the case, all of you who have neutered a dog got some splaining to do!



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:27 AM
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reply to post by Carreau
 


your theory fits in with mine, that catz are evil demon avatars that suck out human life-energy..



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:34 AM
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Ive just read the OP and not some other answers..

In short, NO.

damn, you do understand that english isnt the language spoken in the whole world right? Lets see, in swedish,,,hund= dog,, gud = god... dnuh = WHAT OMG, it didnt spell "gud" how about that.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:37 AM
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reply to post by Rodinus
 


Thank you for the input, Rodinus. I can see that you have done your research into this matter. This issue is one that I've pondered since I was young. What's the connection between the word Dog and the word God? Why are they exact opposites?



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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Originally posted by lostbook
reply to post by Rodinus
 


Thank you for the input, Rodinus. I can see that you have done your research into this matter. This issue is one that I've pondered since I was young. What's the connection between the word Dog and the word God? Why are they exact opposites?


There isnt a connection OK. Its just words that is something else backwards, nothing more. Read about Palindrome palindrome
And Semordnilap semordnilap
edit on 13-5-2013 by Nettlas because: (no reason given)
edit on 13-5-2013 by Nettlas because: (no reason given)
edit on 13-5-2013 by Nettlas because: spelling



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:49 AM
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reply to post by Nettlas
 


So "palindrome" backwards spells "emordnilap"?

Does that mean you agree with the OP?



edit on 13/5/2013 by Theflyingweldsman because: there is a reason for everything



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:50 AM
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reply to post by Theflyingweldsman
 


would have been a mindblown if it included an "S" also



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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reply to post by lostbook
 



My pleasure.

Although i have to admit with Nettlas (I would, however be a little less blunt with my response and not added extra info after reading Weldsmans words too
)

But in my opinion i also have to agree with the Palindrome theory.

Kindest respects

Rodinus



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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Originally posted by StarsInDust
reply to post by lostbook
 

For example, what did redrum (murder) mean before the movie "The Shinning" by Stephen King?
edit on 13-5-2013 by StarsInDust because: It was Stephen King not Stephen Spielberg, I thought I mixed it up, kept bothering me.


Before the Shining, Redrum was a horse.

A lovely horse. Red Rum



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 12:00 PM
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Before the Shining, Redrum was a horse.



Didn't that horse get redrumed or deppandiked (oo that sounds rude!) back in the 80s?


Oh no, that was Shergar! To find out more about RedRum and Shergar visit this link : www.bbc.co.uk...

Sorry, my humour got the better of me!

Kindest respects

Rodinus
edit on 13-5-2013 by Rodinus because: Word added
edit on 13-5-2013 by Rodinus because: Link added





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