What are these crazy wildly spinning "atoms" what is see with my eyes?

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posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:32 AM
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Hi guys,

Is there any scientific explanation to this? Whenever I watch a morning sky for example, I see these wildly spinning atoms. There are many of them and they move very disorderly. Some move slower and some faster, and some make sudden changes of speed or movement, like a sudden circle or something.

I cannot see them in my eyes right now, but only when I concentrate to something which has light. For example a sky.

Does anybody else see these? Are these only some molecules/cells in my eyes? I have long wanted to ask for this.

Feel free to ask if questions arise.




posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:34 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:37 AM
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Originally posted by DocHolidaze
reply to post by RhinestoneCowboy
 


to many mushrooms in your diet, believe me i would know


But I only drink beer



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:40 AM
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reply to post by RhinestoneCowboy
 


I have heard them referred to as "floaties" and they appear due to light or sometimes just "disfocus". From what I understand, it is just crap floating around on your eye-balls. It is pretty natural though, I get them sometimes and have talked to other people who get them randomly as well.


+3 more 
posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:46 AM
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I get these too, its blue field entoptic phenomenon. Your seeing white blood cells move through the blood vessels in your eye kind of cool.

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 12-5-2013 by BriGuyTM90 because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-5-2013 by BriGuyTM90 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:46 AM
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Originally posted by PhysicsAdept
reply to post by RhinestoneCowboy
 


I have heard them referred to as "floaties" and they appear due to light or sometimes just "disfocus". From what I understand, it is just crap floating around on your eye-balls. It is pretty natural though, I get them sometimes and have talked to other people who get them randomly as well.


Yeah could be, at least that is the best explanation yet. It is really easy to see them. I just watch the sky and "focus" and boom, there they are. Wildly flying floaties


It seems though that they move at a same speed and movement, whether I am inside or outside??? If it would be crap, wouldnt it move faster outside?

Also it almost seems that these are inside my eye lol. Thats why I wonderer if they are some cells inside my eye.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:47 AM
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Originally posted by BriGuyTM90
I get these too, its blue field entoptic phenomenon. Yours seeing white blood cells move through the blood vessels in your eye kind of cool.

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 12-5-2013 by BriGuyTM90 because: (no reason given)


AAAH YES, I think this is it. Thank you very much friend. Im kinda disappointed though cause I wanted to be some prophecy child who sees atoms lol!

But yeah they look cool!



The dots are short-lived, visible for a second or less, and traveling short distances along seemingly random, curvy paths. Some of them follow the same path as predecessors.


YEP THIS IS IT! THANKS!
edit on 12-5-2013 by RhinestoneCowboy because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-5-2013 by RhinestoneCowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:51 AM
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reply to post by RhinestoneCowboy
 


You're welcome.
And I know when I first saw them I thought it was some crazy metaphysical thing going on

Its quite the effect when you first see it. Almost like magic.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:54 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:56 AM
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Actually a very interesting question. Didn't know anyone else noticed this but myself. It's one of those questions that nobody seems to ask or notice.
I have seen it/see it as well, when I think about it. And not only in the sky but anywhere.
It's like a static snowy screen on a television set, except much more microscopic and subtle little dots compacted tightly together, swarming around. I don't think many people have noticed it or picked up on it as there doesn't seem to be discussion on it ever, online or anywhere else.
I skeptically wondered if they could really be air molecules that I was seeing. But of course science would tell us that those are not visible to the naked eye.

They DON'T look like this, do they. These are called "floaters" or "worms" and are common especially in sunlight exposure


What you are talking about is much different, right? I know what it looks like but cannot find an image for it.


Definitely a gray area topic , curious about it myself.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:58 AM
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I'll say when I first discovered I had high blood pressure (remarkably high back then) on the truck, the doctor I went to had asked me if I saw visual artifacts like you're describing. I hadn't, but I can induce that by just holding my eyes shut for 30 seconds or so with real light pressure on the outside of the eyelids with my palms. Open my eyes, and it's a few seconds of that.

Anyway... the questions the doc asked seemed to indicate blood pressure could also generate it, but not constant and bright daylight had been the context she was asking. If that helps any?



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 03:01 AM
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reply to post by RhinestoneCowboy
 


I was actually looked into if that was the cause and that's how I ultimately found out about the optical effect taking place. Though certain analogs of neurotransmitters do make you more aware and take notice of the things going on around you.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 03:10 AM
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Of course all the medical responses are just some Doctors opinions and these same Doctors have the imagination of a gnat.

Wait for it!

These things are actually Aliens that exist in interdimentional space. Only some humans, a select few, can see them. You are one of the chosen! Take it as a sign!


Now OP, does that make it any better? It is in all probability as accurate an answer as all the rest. There are so many explanations from the medical world that it is obvious they have no idea.

P



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 03:10 AM
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Originally posted by unb3k44n7
They DON'T look like this, do they. These are called "floaters" or "worms" and are common especially in sunlight exposure



I see couple of those myself too when I concenctrate. And these are definetely inside my eye because they follow my eye movement. They look the same as in picture but are dark. Luckily they dont disturb me unless I concentrate on them.

But yeah the wildly spinning things, they are like small white dots and there are like hundreds of them, moving very wildly.
edit on 12-5-2013 by RhinestoneCowboy because: (no reason given)





Scheerer's phenomenon (after the German ophthalmologist Richard Scheerer, who first drew clinical attention to it in 1924[1]) is the appearance of tiny bright dots (nicknamed blue-sky sprites) moving quickly along squiggly lines in the visual field, especially when looking into bright blue light such as the sky.[2] The dots are short-lived, visible for a second or less, and traveling short distances along seemingly random, curvy paths. Some of them follow the same path as predecessors. The dots may be elongated along the path like tiny worms. The dots appear in the central field of view, within 10 to 15 degrees from the fixation point.[3] The left and right eye see different dots; someone looking with both eyes sees a mixture.


This is a very accurate, I could not describe it better.
edit on 12-5-2013 by RhinestoneCowboy because: (no reason given)
edit on 12-5-2013 by RhinestoneCowboy because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 03:14 AM
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Originally posted by pheonix358
Of course all the medical responses are just some Doctors opinions and these same Doctors have the imagination of a gnat.

Wait for it!

These things are actually Aliens that exist in interdimentional space. Only some humans, a select few, can see them. You are one of the chosen! Take it as a sign!


Now OP, does that make it any better? It is in all probability as accurate an answer as all the rest. There are so many explanations from the medical world that it is obvious they have no idea.

P



PHOCKING ALIENS EVERYWHERE, 5TH DIMENSION ATTACK OF THE ULTIMATE ENTITIES, SHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIT BETTER GET MY MICRO-UZI READY!



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 03:16 AM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
bright daylight had been the context she was asking. If that helps any?


yEP! I think the bright light makes em visible.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 03:26 AM
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reply to post by RhinestoneCowboy
 


It's diffuse light of a single color that makes them stand out. I know this sounds weird but the first time I saw them was from looking at the snow in my yard. Even though they were the same color as the background I could still clearly distinguish them and watch their path. That's why I thought it wasn't an optical effect.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 03:49 AM
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These are just little glitches on the lens of the eye. Some call them floaties.

The ones that one of the above posters provided a picture of, are exactly what I see from
time to time.

It's strange when I see these because they are generally just outside of my focused field of
vision and so when I cut my eyes to focus on them they move at the same velocity my eyes move..

I can never "catch up" to them, so never actually see them except in my periphery



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 04:13 AM
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reply to post by RhinestoneCowboy
 


google "visual snow" (named after the static you see on an old badly tuned television).

There is one big group on the internet that is doing research about this, they work with a german neurologist named Klaus Podol. Research is going slow though since they can't seem to get the funding for it.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 04:15 AM
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Floaters are fairly large, usually, have odd persistent shapes and do move around in the eye over time. The fluid in the eye is fairly viscous so the relocation will be over hours or days usually. The other phenomena are blood cells moving along the arteries (or veins) in the eye. If you see them and hold still and concentrate on them, you may see that they follow specific paths.

The easiest fix is sunglasses.


Another thing you might notice if you look for it is that your eyes probably see slightly different colors -- most noticeable as one eye seeing slightly warmer colors than the other if you alternate looking through each eye. To make this more noticeable, look at a pure white sheet of paper in semi-bright light -- alternating eyes. The paper should probably be slanted a little so your aren't seeing glare. We generally don't notice this effect, but there is no reason at all to expect your eyes to have exactly the same number of rods and cones in them nor equal numbers and distribution of the specific proteins which allow us to see color. Uneven distribution is also tue for your other senses, but you will need to pay close attention.





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