Was there any truth in the accounts of George Adamski?

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posted on May, 11 2013 @ 08:13 PM
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I've always enjoyed reading about the accounts of George Adamski and his contacts with the benevolent Nordic aliens from Venus in the fifties who would relay warnings to humanity about the danger of nuclear war.

Its easy to dismiss Adamski as a mere fantasist but could it be possible that his encounters where not simply inventions?

Its interesting how the character of extra terrestrial encounters has changed over the decades from the first generation of contactee's such as Adamski who would 'attend an interplanetary conference held on the planet Saturn' and have secret meetings with the Pope to the more ambivalent modern reports of alien abduction.

Even if the explanation isn't extra terrestrial there is something more going on here than mere hallucination and hoaxes in my opinion.

I suppose the case of Adamski has a parallel in modern new age 'channelling' and channellers who claim to be in communication with enlightened alien entities such as the 'Pleiadians', 'Ashtar' and the Galactic Council etc.




posted on May, 11 2013 @ 08:43 PM
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Well if true at all, the sheer range of "abductee" accounts would seem we are getting visited from a plethora of alien races.

Frankly seems absurd considering the earth relative position in the Cosmos, a back water tiny world at the far fringe of the milky-way.

Who knows maybe earth is the tourist trap of this section of the universe.



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 09:25 PM
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Hi fadedface. I believe there was some truth in Adamski's accounts regarding the Nordic type aliens. I also believe that some of it was embelished or not very accurate. Perhaps Adamski thought society was not ready for what he observed in alien culture. An interesting note is that the swastica shoe print bares a resemblence to what is termmed a barred galaxy (SBb). Take a look at the images below.






posted on May, 11 2013 @ 10:57 PM
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I didn't read Adamski's writings until the mid-60's, though I have glossed over them a few times since. I remember them, while not specifically, with fondness and quite enjoyed them at the time as I did most everything of the nature I could find; however, his I kept on par with the Superman comics I also read faithfully.

I don't actually recall, even as an adolescent, taking seriously or as truth any of his related claims.

Thanks for the thread. It will be fun to look over them again.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:07 AM
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Adamski was a strange one, guess it comes down to either you believe his story or you don't. The government must've felt they had a need or him though, in whatever capacity they believed, or they wouldn't have given him that visa reserved for diplomats that he had.

Possibile disinfo agent imo, but just guessing ofc.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 06:51 AM
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Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
Adamski was a strange one, guess it comes down to either you believe his story or you don't. The government must've felt they had a need or him though, in whatever capacity they believed, or they wouldn't have given him that visa reserved for diplomats that he had.

Possibile disinfo agent imo, but just guessing ofc.


Interesting to think Adamski could have been a disinfo agent.

If your looking at the timeline of alien abduction it was probably starting to come to prominence around the late fifties and early sixties with the Antonio Vilas Boas case and the Barney and Betty Hill case. Both of these incidents seem to be a prelude to the standard reports of alien abduction we recognise today with elements such as hybridisation and missing time.

If George Adamski was a disinfo agent his accounts of alien contact where the antidote to the darker abduction reports as he portrayed the Nordic aliens as being peaceful messengers to humanity.

Could it be as the first wave of alien abduction was initiated back in the late fifties Adamski was used by the 'powers that be' who of course where in collusion with the aliens and sanctioned the abductions to spread propaganda which claimed the aliens where here for benevolent and peaceful purposes?

What I wonder is did Adamski himself really know the true agenda of the aliens or was he ignorant of their real motives and genuinely believed they where here for noble reasons?
edit on 12-5-2013 by fadedface because: spelling



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 07:09 AM
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Originally posted by phillipplaitklasss
Hi fadedface. I believe there was some truth in Adamski's accounts regarding the Nordic type aliens. I also believe that some of it was embelished or not very accurate. Perhaps Adamski thought society was not ready for what he observed in alien culture. An interesting note is that the swastica shoe print bares a resemblence to what is termmed a barred galaxy (SBb). Take a look at the images below.





That's really interesting comparison between the plaster casts of Orthon's shoeprint and the astronomical chart and does maybe lend some credence to the claims made by Adamski.

I'd also like to see the photographic plate which Orthon gave to Adamski which was said to have contained strange symbols.

I like yourself believe there is some truth in the Adamski accounts of meeting with Nordic aliens however I'm not sure of the true motives of either Adamski or the Nordic aliens. It could be that Adamski did genuinely believe that they where simply here to 'warn' us against the dangerous use of nuclear weapons but somehow I think something more ambiguous was going on as well.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 07:21 AM
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Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
or they wouldn't have given him that visa reserved for diplomats that he had.


Exactly what visa would that be?



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 07:35 AM
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Originally posted by hellobruce

Originally posted by Zcustosmorum
or they wouldn't have given him that visa reserved for diplomats that he had.


Exactly what visa would that be?


He was rumoured to carry a government issue diplomatic passport




Moving on to George Adamski, the researcher George Andrews wrote in his 1986 book Extra-Terrestrials Among Us: “People who traveled with Adamski noticed that he had been issued a special passport, such as is usually reserved for diplomats and high government officials. It is entirely possible that he may have been a CIA disinformation agent who successfully fulfilled the mission of making the subject of UFOs seem so absurd that no independent in-depth investigation would be made by qualified academics.”


mysteriousuniverse.org...



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 10:52 AM
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reply to post by fadedface
 


Thanks OP for reminding me of G.ADAMSKI;it has been such a long time since my school yrs,that it was my class reports.Mostly all my classmates thought G.Adamski was an interesting person. Communications with ETs & discriptions of Venicians people and Planets,as seen from outer space. Untill,the mid 70's,when satellites started sending pics,most descriptions were close or near close to description.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 11:10 AM
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The only person that knows the truth about what he wrote and saw is Adamski.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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His story has some parallels with the lesser known Cedric Allingham. Author of Flying Saucer from Mars.

There was probably a reason for his stories and how they gained so much publicity but who they were really targeted at and their purpose was probably something akin to today's reality TV shows.



posted on May, 12 2013 @ 04:27 PM
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Originally posted by mirageman
His story has some parallels with the lesser known Cedric Allingham. Author of Flying Saucer from Mars.

There was probably a reason for his stories and how they gained so much publicity but who they were really targeted at and their purpose was probably something akin to today's reality TV shows.


I certainly think in the case of Adamski it could be a matter of life imitating art because the fifties was an era of a lot of paranoia which seeped through into popular culture and the many science fiction films of the time particularly a film as 'The Day the Earth Stood Still'.

I'd completely forgot about Cedric Allingham and he reminds me of another quite obscure British contactee from the fifties who made similar claims called James Cooke:


"James Cooke, a resident of Runcorn, Cheshire, England, had already told several alleged flying saucers sightings, when he became part of the "contactee" crowd by claiming that on September 6, 1957, he received, by telepathy, the injunction to go to the top of the hill of Runcorn, which was opposite the city of the same name, and said he did just this, in the middle of the night, 02:15 a.m. on September 7, 1957.

His history is that there, he saw a spaceship in blinding light arriving, coming to hover a few inches above ground-level at some 20 meters in front of him, or less, according to certain sources. The apparatus changed colors from blue to white, then blue again, then dark red.

A slope or staircase with balustrade emerged from this saucer, and a voice told him to enter, by jumping over the ramp without touching it, for the ground was wet of rain. Cooke, hardly startled, willingly did so, thus this case is not "the first alien abduction in England" that some writers thought it was.

Inside the craft, a strong light reigns, without shade, coming from everywhere at the same time, with no visible source. He is commanded to strip himself naked, does so readily, then asked to slip into a kind of plastic suit. He then went into another spaceship that had to be there somewhere, and inside, met a crew of more than 20 men of space, similar to the men, but much taller since 2.10 meters in height, with well-built bodies, black hair, blue uniforms.

As usually in such stories, these people take him along in a saucer trip towards their planet of origin, "Zomdic", orbiting another star or another galaxy, depending on ufological sources. He visits Zomdic, describing its vegetation as yellow instead of green, and the residents hermaphrodites - not bisexual as it will be reported later. "Zomdic" is governed by Wise Seniors, a Master, and as it should be, Cooke would come back from his visit with a teaching to propagate to Earthlings:

"The inhabitants of your planet will upset the balance if they persist in using force instead of harmony. Warn them of the danger."

Brought back home 45 hours after his departure for Zomdic, Cooke thought to make his story sound more true to specify than he forgot to jump over the saucer's ramp as requested when boarding, which caused him an electric shock: indeed the vessels of Zomdic function by electrifying the air, and this is besides the reason why they do not function well in wet weather and why your are not supposed to touch the ramp when the air is damp - Zomdiciens could however think of insulating the ramp, if they are so wise. As a physiological proof, he claimed that others saw the burns that this caused on him.

A little dubitative, he indicated, as for the chance of success, or perhaps as of the relevance or the interest of the extraterrestrials' preaching, reassured by the space man, Cooke then set up "The Church of Aquarius", a UFO cult having its Church in Runcorn. He sat there as a messenger and ambassador of the space men of Zomdic, receiving by telepathy their wise words of peace for the benefit of an audience about which John Keel told it was so numerous that he had to open a second Church in the city, the story not specifying if he was gifted of bilocation to sit there too.

It is claimed that this UFO cult lasted ten years there, and that Cooke "disappeared" in a puff of mystery according to certain sources, or quite simply made himself forgotten - the public interest in the "contactees" had vaned at the end of the Sixties, and it was certainly a wise inspiration of his to "disappear" from public view."

uto.sigsno.org...

It would have been interesting to have met these men and asked them about their experiences.
edit on 12-5-2013 by fadedface because: spelling



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 03:41 AM
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There seems to be some truth in his account but distortions have crept in. One should be aware that even the aliens themselves sometimes discredit their contactees because they want to drive most people away.



posted on May, 15 2013 @ 12:20 PM
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Far as I know, at certain point in time...George Adamski was on the payroll as a spook for the CIA. The CIA gave him the picture of the "Venusian" posing in front of his "saucer" craft; for Adamski's book about his trip to Venus. It was a hoax perpetrated by the CIA...inorder for the CIA to gauge an analyze people's emotions to the possibility of an otherworlder/"Venusian"/ "saucer" encounter with an Earthling.

Cheers,

Erno86
edit on 15-5-2013 by Erno86 because: spelling



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 03:06 PM
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Well he was also hounded by those whom he called The Silence Group everywhere he went doing talks on his world tour. This is his own report: Silence. So perhaps he was working with the good guys in the CIA?



posted on Jun, 2 2013 @ 03:09 PM
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reply to post by Titania
 


I found this too: George Adamski: The toughest job in the world
edit on 2-6-2013 by Titania because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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I recently read Orfeo Angelucci's books and I feel there was something in his experiences. I also suspect that some of these contactees' reputations and character are destroyed by the aliens themselves (Billy Meier?). The aliens do this for their own purposes...



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 03:49 PM
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Originally posted by fadedface
I've always enjoyed reading about the accounts of George Adamski and his contacts with the benevolent Nordic aliens from Venus in the fifties who would relay warnings to humanity about the danger of nuclear war.

Its easy to dismiss Adamski as a mere fantasist but could it be possible that his encounters where not simply inventions?


Ray Palmer had no doubt they were inventions.

I had the pleasure of working with Palmer after he had moved to Amherst, Wisconsin, to continue his magazine publishing career late in life. He bought 'Space World' magazine from Otto Binder and I did a lot of my earliest writing for him, on Russian space mysteries. For free.

Once, in the winter 1974, I even had the opportunity to spend a weekend at his home, while on a business trip to Chicago. I rented a car and drove up.

He told many, many stories, most of which in later years I found corroboration for.

One story was about Adamski.

Palmer told me that when he was editor of a science fiction magazine in the late 1940s, he received a series of manuscripts from Adamski. They were about aliens from Venus visiting Earth to bring a peaceful philosophy.

Palmer rejected the stories as turgid and preachy. Adamski stopped sending them.

A few years later, he told me, he was amused to see the same Venusian peace philosophy being espoused by aliens Adamski now was claiming to have personally met.

"He sold a lot more books claiming it was a true story, than if he had stuck to promoting it as a science fiction adventure." Palmer really laughed, in admiration of Adamski's chutzpah.

Palmer was an amazing man, he essentially "invented" flying saucers as a cultural construct. Look him up.

I need to dig out my photos of us together that weekend almost 40 years ago.



posted on Jun, 3 2013 @ 04:31 PM
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George Adamski was (in my opinion) a complete charlatan.

He wrote and published a fictional book "Pioneers of Space" all about visiting the moon, Mars, and Venus in the late 40's. Then, in the early 50's, he basically claims the same thing, only this time as truly happening to him. Seriously?

Then of course, there are the photos of egg incubators, etc. He was Billy Meier before Billy Meier....

Like Billy after him, George created a cult basically.





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