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The Battle Of Britain Aircraft?

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posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:20 AM
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Some body recentley bought me the original "Battle Of Britain" movie remastered on DVD,with the likes of michael caine and trevor howard staring.
The film was released in 1969 and although its obvious many of the aircraft on the runways are models most look real? especially the scenes where Goerings right hand man is inspecting the huge display of Heinkels and ME109's,my question is what happened to all these aircraft? surely they cant have all been destroyed ?,or am i wrong and most of them were props?
Am i also right in thinking alot of the footage was original from ww2? especially dog fight scenes and Heinkels crashing in the sea?
Just a passing last note:-Did you know that George Lucas in-printed some of the dog fight scenes in the original "star wars" trilogy over actual ww2 footage of spits and ME109's so as to make the Tie fighters and X-Wings look more realistic in battle whilst they were fighting?

any way ,Jolly Spiffing Movie,dont you know old boy,What,What.

Regards.




posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:31 AM
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Not to many of the old WWII planes are still around. Even less are in flying condition. Many of the WWII planes are usually in memorials or museums. www.patriotspoint.org...



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:36 AM
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Tried your link mate but it didnt work? I read about the making of the Memphis Belle and there was only 3 aircraft used in the whole film,they were repainted with different markings through out filming to look like different aircraft,and damaged parts fabricated and fitted to look like damage in certain scenes-real shame thats all there is left!



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:41 AM
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posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:45 AM
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Ok,thanks that worked,nice link





A total of 20,351 Spitfires of all types were eventually built, plus 2,408 seafires modified to operate from aircraft carriers.


That seems like such a huge number!! doesnt seem that long ago to have so few left? wonder how many were lost during the war?



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:56 AM
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posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 05:09 AM
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Anyone ever heard of the Wellington? Only two are left in the whole world and I am very proud to say that my Great Grandfather flew one of the two existing ones.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 05:36 AM
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Hi Zanzibar,


Anyone ever heard of the Wellington? Only two are left in the whole world and I am very proud to say that my Great Grandfather flew one of the two existing ones.


yeah,of course! about 10 years ago they raised 1 from loch ness that was pretty much complete-fantastic aircraft!

Regards mate.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 05:55 AM
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Yeah, the one my Great Grandfather flew is in a museum and is a brillinat sight surrounded by all of the newer aircraft.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 08:37 AM
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Yes, it's amazing so many thousand (tough and rugged fighting) aeroplanes can be manufactured once upon a time and yet so few be left now.

Duxford has a fair few of the UK's collection and is worth looking at duxford.iwm.org.uk.

In fact Duxford is an excellent place and IMO the equal of any aircraft-based war museum anywhere.....what others have that it doesn't is made up for by the stuff it has and they don't.....and the accessability is superb.

Often you can wander through the hangers where the WW2 birds are being serviced.....their flying Hurricane 'with everything open or off' is a sight you won't see anywhere else......or the Mustang....or the Spits......or the.....you get the idea?

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By the way the 'Me Bf 109' aircraft in the Battle of Britain film were all Hispano HA-1112-M1L 'Buchon's' (a kind of deep breasted Spainish pigeon).

Some of these were sent to Spain as airframes lacking propellers, tailplanes and engines. Hispano had a licence to manufacture the plane and eventually ended up fitting many of their '109's', ironically enough, with a version of the Rolls Royce Merlin engine.

The Spainish made 170 Merlin 109s out of a total of 239 and used them up until 1967 apparantly.

The 'Heinkel 111's' in the film were actually, again, Spainish Merlin engined C.2111's.

The first CASA aircraft were delivered in 1945, and production of all types totaled about 130, all equipped with German supplied Jumo 211F-2 engines.

By the mid-1950s, however, continued production and even maintenance required a new source of engines, and in April 1956, 173 Rolls-Royce Merlin 500-20 engines were ordered from Great Britain. The Merlin powered bombers were designated C.2111-B, the reconnaissance bomber C.2111-D, and a new version, a nine-passenger transport, the C.2111-T8, was produced.

The last Spanish Heinkels were retired in the late 1960s.

Hope this is of interest.




[edit on 5-11-2004 by sminkeypinkey]



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 09:08 AM
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Pinkey Mate, you stole my thunder about the Battle of Britain movie aircraft....just in case FYI.....the stukas were models as were all the crashing and burning ones...you'd kill the producers if they weren't.

As to the numbers of aircraft built in WW2, if you included all the trainers and transports as well I would say there would easily be 300-400,000 all up. I think the Soviets had the record for one type, the Yak-9D...over thirty thousand of this one type alone.....................and there are hundreds (warbirds in General) flying today or in museum displays.

One year at a place in the USA called Oshkosh they gathered more than fifty Mustangs and a handful of P-47 Thunderbolts together for a massed fly past to mark the 60th Anniversary of the 8th AAF in the ETO or something like that.

But the few do get fewer every year.

Thank god for these threads. I'd go bonkers without them



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 09:20 AM
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Originally posted by craigandrew
One year at a place in the USA called Oshkosh they gathered more than fifty Mustangs and a handful of P-47 Thunderbolts together for a massed fly past to mark the 60th Anniversary of the 8th AAF in the ETO or something like that.


- It's a much over-used and far too abused term but that must have been awesome!

I saw the Battle of Britain flight pass over my house once (unfortunately just the once, I wasn't living under one of the usual flight-paths) and that was music to stir the soul man! (and that's just one Spit, one Hurricane and the Lancaster.......and truth be told it was the lanc that went right overhead not the other two....but wow it was low. Amazing)

The other really good one we used to take in once or twice a year was outside North Weald (old WW2 fighter field in Essex it still does shows). There was a spot just outside the fences you could go where the planes came in over the field. No entrance fee and up close and vibrated to the marrow as their usual good turnout flew so low overhead.

Thunderbolts, Mustangs, Spits, Bearcat, Tigercat....usually most of Duxford's stuff would come. Once we had the Vampire and Meteor....early jets are so LOUD! Mmmmm



Thank god for these threads. I'd go bonkers without them


- Always here to help mate.!



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 11:48 AM
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Do a Web search on Historical societies. You'd be surprised at how many societies are rebuilding vintage aircraft.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 11:56 AM
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Originally posted by Toelint
Do a Web search on Historical societies. You'd be surprised at how many societies are rebuilding vintage aircraft.


- I like the idea of the group in the USA doing something a little different.

The J85 engined Me 262 project at 'the Texas Airplane Factory'?

Interesting project. www.stormbirds.com...

It's the only way any of us will every see one in the air (mind you considering the only alternate way of having seen one fly I'm pretty glad about that!)



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:23 PM
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I also read that the Spits were piloted by RAF pilots that were on active duty. They had a list of requirements to apply for these positions, and just about every pilot was beating down the door for the chance to fly.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 05:20 PM
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Originally posted by monsoon65
I also read that the Spits were piloted by RAF pilots that were on active duty. They had a list of requirements to apply for these positions, and just about every pilot was beating down the door for the chance to fly.


- You would, wouldn't you?



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 07:40 PM
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In the doco I noted four Confederate Air Force "Colonels" (before the adopted a new PC name recently) picking up thier 3 Spanish "109"s and a Spitfire offered them to the producers on condition they flew them, which was accepted.

Many Spanish AF pilots flew the "Luftwaffe" jobs.

I also heard that most of the RAF types took leave to do the job, and some were ex-RAF wartime pilots who had actually flown the old girls.

Amazing the cosmetic changes the made to the later mark spitfires especially the Griffons to make them look superficially like Mk.Is....I mean some of those late war Spits were so different they almost should have been given a new name.......Like "Super Spitfire" maybe?



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 07:47 PM
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I thought some of my Vintage enthusiast freinds would like this link.

It is Temora Aviation Museum down in Victoria. One day (if I rob a bank) I hope to get down there for a look see.

www.aviationmuseum.com.au...

Most of the collection is flyable including a Mk.VIII Spitfire in WW2 RAAF SWPA colours.

An aqquaitance of mine works there. He is ex RAN FAA maintenance and says working there is a pure joy.

I'm jealous of him and anyone working or living near a decent avo museum.


I'll post more aussie and kiwi links as I come across them.



[edit on 5-11-2004 by craigandrew]



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 08:18 PM
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Some of you might like to know that until very recently, TBM Avengers, a torpedo bomber from the US Pacific Fleet, were used in Canada ( Province of New Brunswick) for fire fighting purposes. See the link at www.gnb.ca.... They were used later than 1997, but I'm not sure how recently. I know that the last time I was in New Brunswick, last year, there were several of them parked at Fredericton Airport. I believe the Avenger is the plane George Bush Sr. piloted during WW II and in which he was shot down.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 11:03 PM
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The Luftwaffe jobs were Spanish (as noted) and I have a feeling the Spits were Portuguese and Scandinavian...

After the war most 'planes that were surplus to requirements were broken up for their metal or dumped. A lot of planes were just pushed off aircraft carrier decks off the Australian coast, for example.




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