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posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 04:08 AM
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we all know that there is multiple masonic rite
but i would like to know if there is a rites named
solomon's rite & if yes a little detail plz, thx .




posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 06:28 AM
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The 13th Degree of the Scottish Rite is sometimes called "The Royal Arch of Solomon", it is a significant degree that is preceded by the 11th and 12th degrees as subcomponents and is the penultimate degree of "Practical Masonry" (Degrees 4th-14th)
King Solomon features heavily in the degrees of Practical Masonry as well as several of the higher degrees.

There may be some other Masonic Rite that has a degree named "Solomon's Rite", Freemasonry is quite irregular, even the Blue Degrees differ slightly between many precincts.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 11:42 AM
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If you want to know anything about masonry, MrNecros is exactly the WRONG person to take that from... read any of his previous posts as an example.

For real good information on masonry, fully searchable, try here. there are many different "Rites" of masonry. The Blue Lodge, the traditional first three degrees have a variety of different forms, the primary being York Rite, either emulation or Duncan's Ritual, all with variations in them, but basically the same. This is due to the fact that in the United States alone there are at least 2 regular grand lodges in each state (though a discussion of regular would take a while) each of which is responsible for the ritual in the state.

There are also several other grand lodges around the world, usually one in each country (state).

Beyond the first three degrees, which culminate in the Master Masons degree, there are York Rites and Scottish rites which confer the 4th through the 33rd degrees. There are also other bodies that confer different rites, not all recognized by regular masonry. There is no degree higher than Master Mason. All other degrees beyond the Master Mason are expansions on the material presented, and are universally (by masons) cnsidered SIDE degrees.

if not, ask a specific question and we will try to answer.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 11:48 AM
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Hey TD,

give Necros a break ( a little one) in the last few months that i have been around he at least HAS learned the 12 and 13 come before 14.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 11:53 AM
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Ok, true... he has learned to count... maybe the meds are finally kicking in...



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 11:55 AM
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OK guys, let's not bait please.



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 12:16 PM
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dont you use BAIT for FISH?

been a while since i had a line in the water?


'sides I was defending him. I gave him credit for being able to put 12&13 before
14.

[edit on 5-11-2004 by stalkingwolf]



posted on Nov, 5 2004 @ 09:58 PM
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Originally posted by nimda
we all know that there is multiple masonic rite
but i would like to know if there is a rites named
solomon's rite & if yes a little detail plz, thx .


To my knowledge there has never been a Masonic Rite of that name. Two good resouces are "Encyclopedia of Freemasonry" by Dr. Albert G. Mackey and "Coil's Masonic Encyclopedia" by Henry Wilson Coil. Both of these volumes list all known Masonic and quasi-Masonic Rites, as well as the titles of the degrees they contained.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Nov, 6 2004 @ 12:01 PM
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Always impressive how 5-6 Masons jump on after I post anything and shout about me being completely wrong and not actually post anything relevent to the question.
Heck, I didn't post anything that anyone actually thinks is wrong, even according to our resident zombies, but they still feel the need to jump up and down saying I'm completely wrong.
What exactly did the bunch of you think was wrong with the first post?
That the 13th Degree isn't sometimes called "The Royal Arch of Solomon"
or that it is a significant degree (delivers a moral), that it has two preceding degrees that contribute to it or maybe the idea that Freemasonry is not completely uniform in all its guises?

Or maybe you just felt the need to make more zombie noises?



posted on Nov, 6 2004 @ 12:06 PM
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MrNecros, see my last post please.



posted on Nov, 6 2004 @ 01:10 PM
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Originally posted by MrNECROS

That the 13th Degree isn't sometimes called "The Royal Arch of Solomon"
or that it is a significant degree (delivers a moral), that it has two preceding degrees that contribute to it or maybe the idea that Freemasonry is not completely uniform in all its guises?


The 13 of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in both Jurisdictions of the United States are styled "Royal Arch of Solomon", and the two ceremonies have many similarities. However, it is not uniform; actually, in some jurisdictions of the Rite, the degree is called "Royal Arch of Enoch", with no references to King Solomon in the ceremony.

In any case, the degree belongs to the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite; in regard to the gentleman's original question, it is irrelevant in regard to a Solomonic Rite, although this title could perhaps be used to describe the Blue Degrees.

Fiat Lvx.



posted on Nov, 6 2004 @ 01:21 PM
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Originally posted by Masonic Light

The 13 of the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite in both Jurisdictions of the United States are styled "Royal Arch of Solomon", and the two ceremonies have many similarities. However, it is not uniform; actually, in some jurisdictions of the Rite, the degree is called "Royal Arch of Enoch", with no references to King Solomon in the ceremony.

In any case, the degree belongs to the Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite; in regard to the gentleman's original question, it is irrelevant in regard to a Solomonic Rite, although this title could perhaps be used to describe the Blue Degrees.
Fiat Lvx.


ML,

Actually in the Northern Masonic Jurisdiction, the 13th Degree is styled "Master of the Ninth Arch" In the Southern Jurisdiction it is "Royal Arch of Solomon" As you said, they're quite similar, but have both been modified in recent years.

Fraternally,



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