Hispanic worker sues for injury; Couldn't read warning sign in English...

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+13 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:50 AM
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MODS: I put this story here because, I think one or the other political party will pickup on this story and try and pander votes from this Hispanic Work Force.

Hispanic Custodians On Auraria Campus Claim Discrimination



A group of Hispanic custodians at the Auraria Campus in downtown Denver are claiming they are victims of discrimination.


They’ve filed a complaint against the campus operator that could be reviewed by a federal judge.

Yes, this is discrimination because you are not catered too, why even make an attempt to learn English if the Government decides it's the employer's responsibility to translate the common language of your adopted country into the language of the country you left for what ever reason.

“Too many things have happened to me there that I don’t even know how to explain it,” said Auraria custodian Bertha Ribota.


Ribota said she was injured at work because she couldn’t read a warning sign that was in English. “If I could speak English I wouldn’t have the problems that exist,” said Ribota.

Now this is really Good,,, read what their attorney has to say:

“What is sort of a neutral business practice, that they speak English on campus and it’s an English-only campus has a discriminatory impact on this group of workers,” said attorney Tim Markham.


When asked if it was a problem those employees were not being informed of those things in their native language, campus spokesman Blaine Nickeson replied, “I don’t know if that’s a problem. I think it’s one of the concerns. I will go on to say there’s not a statute to translate.”

RIGHT! You moved to America, you need to learn English, or I should Sue every Employer I've worked for in America for not have all the signs translated into Mandarin Chinese!

Campus operators said there is no state law requiring complete translations. It is standard at other universities in Colorado.
There shouldn't be a Law.
Here is the source: denver.cbslocal.com...
www.drudgereport.comdenver.cbslocal.com...

Now the story these people are telling. They can't read English so it is the fault of the Employer, which just happens to be Auraria Campus in Denver, CO.
Just maybe the employees should carry a little pocket translator that runs on two AAA batteries like I did for years when my husband was not with me to explain a word to me I did not know the meaning of. That would be co,,om sense wouldn't it.
Or is it the responsibility of the employer to print all signs in your language because your to lazy to go to the Provided For Free English is a Second Language Classes at most schools and libraries.
edit on 10-5-2013 by guohua because: (no reason given)




posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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Campus operators said there is no state law requiring complete translations. It is standard at other universities in Colorado.


Sounds like it's a common practice to have warnings translated but these guys got caught with their pants down.


+3 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:57 AM
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The injured worker has a legitimate case. OSHA regulations require that warning signs be posted in both English AND Spanish. Like it or not, there are people who do not speak English and are hired by the employer with full knowledge that there is a language barrier. This is the employers fault for hiring non-English speaking workers and/or not providing the required warning signs.
edit on 10-5-2013 by LeatherNLace because: (no reason given)


+40 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:01 PM
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You want to live and work in the United States then learn the language. We speak English.

You want to speak Spanish go back to Mexico.


+16 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:02 PM
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it doesn't say what counties they are from, but in other countries that do not speak english, they don't always print things in english.

this is the US. we speak english here. learn it or don't you do not deserve special privileges, being from another country. especially if your gonna stay and work here.


+19 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:04 PM
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Make english the Official language and we would not have this problem. If you don’t learn English, its your fault and you cant sue


+3 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:05 PM
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Originally posted by intrepid

Campus operators said there is no state law requiring complete translations. It is standard at other universities in Colorado.


Sounds like it's a common practice to have warnings translated but these guys got caught with their pants down.


Standard practice and against the law are two different things.

They are being sued for breaking no laws, when hired, these employees understood this campus is English only.

Standard practice is to have casual Friday, so if a company doesn't implement a casual Friday, should they be liable for a lawsuit?

Employees know the company policy they are hired to work for, this company policy is English only. We are free to work at any company we want to in the US; there was no neglect on behalf of the campus in these actions, only neglect on behalf of the employees and an unwillingness to learn the language used at their place of employment.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:06 PM
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reply to post by guohua
 


If an organization is going to hire people that don't speak English, then it is their responsibility that they are still safe in the work place.

No one forced them to hire these people who don't speak English, it was their choice. And since it was their choice, it is their duty to ensure their safety and that includes providing warning signs in the language of the people they decide to hire.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:08 PM
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Originally posted by LeatherNLace
The injured worker has a legitimate case. OSHA regulations require that warning signs be posted in both English AND Spanish. Like it or not, there are people who do not speak English and are hired by the employer with full knowledge that there is a language barrier. This is the employers fault for hiring non-English speaking workers and/or not providing the required warning signs.
edit on 10-5-2013 by LeatherNLace because: (no reason given)

OSHA signage regulations.
Nowhere does it specify language.

It does specify that employees will be instructed about the signs though.

edit on 5/10/2013 by abecedarian because: (no reason given)


+4 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:09 PM
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I would love to be on that jury.

Basically, we need to declare that common language to be English. A requirement for citizenship should be proficiency in English.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:10 PM
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for all those that say the company didn't have to hire these spanish speaking people, what would you say if they got sued for discrimination, for not hiring hispanic workers, that don't speak english.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by ElohimJD
They are being sued for breaking no laws, when hired, these employees understood this campus is English only.


You do realize that there is a difference between a criminal case (law broken) and a civil lawsuit (negligence). The employer interviewed the employee prior to the hiring. Obviously the employee didn't know that the campus was "English only", because someone hired him. The employer knew there was a language barrier. The employer failed to provide warning signs in the employees spoken language. That is what we call negligence. Negligence is not necessarily a crime, but it certainly is grounds for a lawsuit.
edit on 10-5-2013 by LeatherNLace because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:12 PM
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Originally posted by DistantRumor
reply to post by guohua
 


If an organization is going to hire people that don't speak English, then it is their responsibility that they are still safe in the work place.

No one forced them to hire these people who don't speak English, it was their choice. And since it was their choice, it is their duty to ensure their safety and that includes providing warning signs in the language of the people they decide to hire.


Yep - very true. If you don't want to have translated signs, then don't hire Spanish-speaking only people. Don't tell me the company wasn't aware when they interviewed her that she only spoke Spanish. It's up to the employer to do what they can to keep their employees safe. That includes ALL employees, not just the ones who speak English.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:13 PM
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Originally posted by DistantRumor
reply to post by guohua
 


If an organization is going to hire people that don't speak English, then it is their responsibility that they are still safe in the work place.

No one forced them to hire these people who don't speak English, it was their choice. And since it was their choice, it is their duty to ensure their safety and that includes providing warning signs in the language of the people they decide to hire.


This says it all. It is incumbent on the COMPANY to provide a safe workplace for the employee.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:14 PM
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Originally posted by hounddoghowlie
for all those that say the company didn't have to hire these spanish speaking people, what would you say if they got sued for discrimination, for not hiring hispanic workers, that don't speak english.


If they make English a job requirement, then there is no discrimination as long as they are open to hiring all races as long as they speak English.

But they didn't do that, you are playing the "what if" game. They knowningly hired people that don't speak English, and so the responsibility is on them to ensure the safety of those workers.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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Originally posted by abecedarian
OSHA signage regulations.
Nowhere does it specify language.

But it does say:

1910.145(f)(4)(iv)
The signal word and the major message shall be understandable to all employees who may be exposed to the identified hazard.


edit on 10-5-2013 by daskakik because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:17 PM
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Originally posted by hounddoghowlie
for all those that say the company didn't have to hire these spanish speaking people, what would you say if they got sued for discrimination, for not hiring hispanic workers, that don't speak english.


You really think that's why they hired them? BS - they hired them because they're cheap labor. All they had to do to avoid hiring them was to use any of a hundred legal reasons - happens all the time.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:20 PM
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Originally posted by LeatherNLace
The injured worker has a legitimate case. OSHA regulations require that warning signs be posted in both English AND Spanish. Like it or not, there are people who do not speak English and are hired by the employer with full knowledge that there is a language barrier. This is the employers fault for hiring non-English speaking workers and/or not providing the required warning signs.
edit on 10-5-2013 by LeatherNLace because: (no reason given)



"Voluntary Use of Bilingual Signage

While OSHA does not mandate that signs be posted in both English and Spanish, it does require that workers be informed and educated about workplace hazards in an effective manner, which could include bilingual signage, according to one OSHA official. Even without an explicit rule, many companies are choosing to post signs in both languages because they have such a high number of Hispanic employees.


Read more at: www.graphicproducts.com..."


Not required but strongly suggested.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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Originally posted by LeatherNLace

Originally posted by ElohimJD
They are being sued for breaking no laws, when hired, these employees understood this campus is English only.


You do realize that there is a difference between a criminal case (law broken) and a civil lawsuit (negligence). The employer interviewed the employee prior to the hiring. Obviously the employee didn't know that the campus was "English only", because someone hired him. The employer knew there was a language barrier. The employer failed to provide warning signs in the employees spoken language. That is what we call negligence. Negligence is not necessarily a crime, but it certainly is grounds for a lawsuit.
edit on 10-5-2013 by LeatherNLace because: (no reason given)


fair point.


+2 more 
posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:21 PM
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reply to post by DistantRumor
 


the worker here in this case knew it was a english speaking campus. if you want to assimilate into a new country it is your responsibility, to learn the language, of the country in order to function as a productive member of that society.

not the country to cottle you and hold your hand as you make your way through life.

i' use to run a repair shop had many hispanics come in and try and pull the no habla b.s on me. but just as soon as i started talking money, they could speak english just fine.






edit on 10-5-2013 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)
edit on 10-5-2013 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)





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