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'Nuclear Event' at Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Maryland

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posted on May, 9 2013 @ 10:50 PM
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Oh, these are always fun listings to find on RSOE. Usually, they are not all that interesting though. A pipe leak or a tripped sensor somewhere. No biggy and nothing to really wonder about. Once in awhile, it's a head scratcher....Like this one.


One of two reactors at the Calvert Cliffs nuclear power plant in Southern Maryland shut down suddenly Wednesday night after an as-yet-unexplained malfunction, a Constellation spokesman said. Unit 2 went offline at 9:47 p.m. after a shutdown of the turbine that generates electricity from the nuclear reactor, according to Kory Raftery, spokesman for the Constellation Energy Nuclear Group.

"As-yet-unexplained malfunction". Yeah, is it just me, or are those about the last words you want to find mixed together in a sentence talking about a Nuclear Power station?


"We're looking at every possible option right now and at this point in time wouldn't want to speculate," he said. He wouldn't predict when the reactor would resume operations, saying plant operators first needed to identify the cause of the shutdown, fix it and test to be sure.
(Source: RSOE Index Report)

Well... I should hope so! Identify! Yes. This would be a good thing. Fixing IS better.... Test, many times, please!

I just hate it when things break and you just can't be sure why. I imagine the location and nature of the event does tend to add to it.

According to the NRC? It's another 'oldie but goodie'.



Location: Lusby, MD (40 miles S of Annapolis, MD) Region I
Operator: Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Inc.
Operating License: Issued - 07/31/1974
Renewed License: Issued - 03/23/2000
License Expires: 07/31/2034
Docket Number: 05000317
Reactor Type: Pressurized Water Reactor
Licensed MWt: 2,737
Reactor Vendor/Type: Combustion Engineering
Containment Type: Dry, Ambient Pressure
(Source: Nuclear Regulatory Commission)




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:02 PM
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They have these events every now and then. I doubt if that thing will grow into a big mushroom tonight.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:15 PM
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Isn't this what is supposed to happen.... shutdowns as a result of a malfunction. Doesn't this happen with all sorts of industries?



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:41 PM
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reply to post by MadMax7
 


Yes. However most industries can look at a control board and tell you what the problem is or where the problem occurred.

It shut down for unspecified reasons is just not good enough for a Nuclear Power Plant. This response screams of 'It is taking us some time to dream up an excuse.'

P



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by pheonix358
 


Most industries can't do that. I've heard the "we don't know why it happened" excuse from all over the place. In this case, I'm not worried about the why right now, because of the simple fact that the system worked as advertised. There was a problem in the turbine system somewhere, and it shut down. I don't see a problem here. It could be a previously unknown failure point, or it could be a rare failure point that they haven't seen often, so they don't recognize it yet.

Look at the Boeing 787. Two battery failures in a system that was supposed to have one failure every few million hours (as certified), that wound up with emergencies (one in flight, one on the ground). They still don't know what caused them, or why certain batteries were being returned damaged, but they have returned the aircraft to service. (I know a nuke plant is "more dangerous" but it's a similar scenario.)



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:28 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 


A reactor plant is a pretty complex operation . Also they have protocols they must follow when issues arise .



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:37 AM
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I sure didn't mean to give folks the impression that I'm worried about anything in the way of a serious accident, as that would be termed at a Nuclear facility. I'm merely very curious and would be interested to see if this ends up being something they DO restart from. San Onofre Nuclear Power Plant in California is still down, as far as I know, from a shut down over technical issues following an upgrade.

However, this isn't just Maryland. This is Annapolis, Maryland. Short of being D.C. itself, it wouldn't come in a more critical place if a true accident were in progress. I.E.... No one would need to read my humble thread to have heard about it, to be sure.

Still.....It is an interesting report to read. I do see RSOE reports of Nuclear events, as they are termed, often enough. More than I think average people would like to know happen...and almost all are explained or at least a B.S. explanation is given on the spot. Perhaps this is something to clip the power output for awhile? That alone would be a might painful with what surely will be a hot summer coming in fast, eh?



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 12:42 AM
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Wabbit, I'd have to agree.....not words I'd like to see together either. As another poster said, they should know why it happened....immediately. Why on earth do they have computers monitoring these things???


Are they not supposed to say WHY it shut down??(computers)

I have to say, it's a good thing that it shut down because of a problem, however.....I'll just leave it at that.

Anything nuclear is just down right scary.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 01:13 AM
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reply to post by Wrabbit2000
 

From your link...

Unit 2 went offline at 9:47 p.m. after a shutdown of the turbine that generates electricity from the nuclear reactor, according to Kory Raftery, spokesman for the Constellation Energy Nuclear Group. Some valves feeding steam to the turbine closed unexpectedly, triggering its shutdown, Raftery explained, and that led to the reactor itself shutting down to prevent a buildup of steam pressure in its cooling system.


The turbine is housed in another building from the reactor. Steam is fed to it through a closed loop secondary system which is not in contact with the primary coolant flow in the reactor building itself. So the turbine "shutting down" (or tripping) would imply the problem is only with the electricity generating machinery and not the reactor.

Which is a good thing. If they are telling us true. Since it appears to be the steam inlet valves to the generator they will have to drain everything, go in and inspect an old plants plumbing (especially valves), fix it, and then slowly bring it back up to operating capacity.

The reactor was "taken off line" which is not a Scram, which is another good thing. I'm only going on what they said in your link. I am pretty sure if this had been an actual emergency they would have told us nothing. Until the news taped the explosion.

Kind of hard to hide that.




posted on May, 10 2013 @ 08:58 AM
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Funny this event does not seem to have even made the main stream media @3:30 est I was listening to DC radio morning news, no report, worked, home again, 9:00 am est, tv on local Baltimore morning news wrap up no mention. Checked the daily SO report on u-tube. Surprise surprise they have alittle problem down there. I live close.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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That very same day that event happened.....Power went out to a large chunk of Pennsylvania (PA reported over 15,000 outages in the northern part of the state alone), parts of eastern Ohio, Maryland, New Jersey and West Virginia. Yet the power company, First Energy, that serves those areas; claimed a "transmission line issue". These two stories are connected, as the reactor that shut down, provides a feed to those areas.

But I wonder why First Energy didn't tell the whole truth? Hmmm, seems to be a big trend with corporations these days.
edit on 5/10/2013 by MadDogtheHunter because: Grammer correction
edit on 5/10/2013 by MadDogtheHunter because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:45 AM
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reply to post by MadDogtheHunter
 


Technically they did tell the truth. There really was a transmission line issue, seeing as how there was no power coming down the transmission line.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:47 AM
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Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by MadDogtheHunter
 


Technically they did tell the truth. There really was a transmission line issue, seeing as how there was no power coming down the transmission line.


I get what you're saying, lol. But it just goes to show how much disinformation infects this world.





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