NASA Scientists Observe The Brightest Explosion Ever

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posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:41 AM
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Was looking at some supernova news because of a supernova thread posted here recently that got me interested, and found out that there was a supernova, as well as a gamma-ray burst seen a few days ago by scientists, and apparently, it was the brightest in history (not as seen from Earth, but in the actual brightness, or the absolute magnitude).

I think this piece of information is really cool. Can you imagine the view from a planet relatively close to this star? It would be amazing. Too bad it wasn't visible to the naked eye, it would have been an amazing sight.


If you weren't looking at the constellation Leo very early on Saturday morning, you probably missed the brightest explosion NASA scientists have ever observed. It was three times as bright as the next-brightest explosion, and a ridiculous, basically unimaginable 35 billion times brighter than visible light.
www.popsci.com...

The supernova occurred about 3.6 billion light-years away.




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:47 AM
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What boggles my mind even more than the massive explosion is the fact that it was 3.6 BILLION LIGHT YEARS away.. So scientists essentially witnessed something that happened 3.6 Billion years ago.

Totally mind blowing. I can't even fathom a million, let alone 3.6 billion.
edit on 9-5-2013 by ZiggyMojo because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:49 AM
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What you are saying is this explosion is as old almost, as our earth itself!
The flash of the explosion having travelled for over three billion years to be seen eventually by us!
This alone boggles my mind.
If this was so right, perhaps at the distance it was not a super nova but the flash of a separate BIG BANG out on the perifery of our own universe....?
Maybe
edit on 9-5-2013 by stirling because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:50 AM
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Maybe it's just me, but there's something very cool about the concept of witnessing first-hand an event that took place 3.6 billion years ago.

ETA - yeah, what ziggy said - damn, I take too long to make a post..
edit on 9-5-2013 by redtic because: i'm slow



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:56 AM
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Originally posted by extraterrestrialentity
Was looking at some supernova news because of a supernova thread posted here recently that got me interested


I really do not mean to be rude but you probably read this thread

Supernova 10/12 may 2013

And now you create a thread about the exact same supernova, in the same forum.

Why not add this information to the already existing thread?

Peace



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


That thread is about a star expected to go supernova. This is a thread about a supernova that has already occurred.

There is a clear difference.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:06 AM
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reply to post by extraterrestrialentity
 


It's is the same supernova, read the links in the thread.


www.abovetopsecret.com...

The glow is due to reach earth on may 10/12 the supernova happened a long time ago.

edit on 9-5-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:07 AM
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reply to post by extraterrestrialentity
 


This really isn't some weekly occurrence, pretty safe to assume it's the same supernova.

Peace



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:11 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


A supernova that happened in the past is the same one expected to occur in the future?



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:12 AM
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Originally posted by Wifibrains
reply to post by extraterrestrialentity
 


It's is the same supernova, read the links in the thread.


www.abovetopsecret.com...

The glow is due to reach earth on may 10/12 the supernova happened a long time ago.
edit on 9-5-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)

If the light is expected to reach the Earth, then how was the light already measured? Was it transported here?



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by extraterrestrialentity
 


Believe me it's GRB 130427A..... follow the link.

Sorry



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:27 AM
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reply to post by extraterrestrialentity
 


Satalites picked up the gamma ray bursts(GRB) I think these are a higher frequencey of light and travel faster than the visible spectrum of light giving the heads up.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:29 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Once again, that is not possible. The supernova in the other thread is expected to happen in the future, the supernova in this thread has already happened.

Your opinion on whether or not they are the same supernovas is irrelevant. You can be pretty sure that they are the same, but the fact is that the two supernovas occurred at different times (both supernovas have already occurred billions of years ago, so the term "occurred" is applicable here).



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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Originally posted by Wifibrains
reply to post by extraterrestrialentity
 


Satalites picked up the gamma ray bursts(GRB) I think these are a higher frequencey of light and travel faster than the visible spectrum of light giving the heads up.

Gamma rays do not move any faster than other frequencies of light.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:35 AM
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It's the same supernova


If you weren't looking at the constellation Leo very early on Saturday morning, you probably missed the brightest explosion NASA scientists have ever observed



On April 27, NASA's Swift Space Telescope and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope spotted the highest-energy gamma-ray burst (GRB) — an explosion of a massive star in the last stage of its life — ever before seen.
edit on 9-5-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:39 AM
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Originally posted by extraterrestrialentity
reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Once again, that is not possible. The supernova in the other thread is expected to happen in the future, the supernova in this thread has already happened.

Your opinion on whether or not they are the same supernovas is irrelevant. You can be pretty sure that they are the same, but the fact is that the two supernovas occurred at different times (both supernovas have already occurred billions of years ago, so the term "occurred" is applicable here).


Sigh....once again. From your link

Popsci

Bottom of the article it links to nasa as the source..

Nasa source


A record-setting blast of gamma rays from a dying star in a distant galaxy has wowed astronomers around the world. The eruption, which is classified as a gamma-ray burst, or GRB, and designated GRB 130427A, produced the highest-energy light ever detected from such an event.


Notice this: GRB 130427A

Now the other thread...

Other thread

opening article states:


The late x ray observations of GRB 130427A by Swift-XRT clearly evidence a pattern typical of a family of GRBs associated to supernova (SN) following the Induce Gravitational Collapse (IGC) paradigm (Rueda & Ruffini 2012; Pisani et al. 2013). We assume that the luminosity of the possible SN associated to GRB 130427A would be the one of 1998bw, as found in the IGC sample described in Pisani et al. 2013.


Notice the same GRB 130427A

I really think it's the same supernova...

Peace



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:39 AM
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Its all fascinating stuff, it is hard to imagine that the light from that has been traveling at the speed of light for 3.6 billion years then again the light from the sun is 8 minutes old when it gets here and we can see the sun.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by operation mindcrime
 

Sorry about that. Did not see the link at the bottom. The article is very confusing as it seemed to say that the supernova had already occurred.

Mods, please close this thread.
edit on 9-5-2013 by extraterrestrialentity because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 02:34 PM
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Originally posted by extraterrestrialentity
Sorry about that. Did not see the link at the bottom. The article is very confusing as it seemed to say that the supernova had already occurred.

Mods, please close this thread.
All the articles say the explosion already started. What hasn't happened yet is the occurrence of peak brightness expected around May 10-12.
edit on 9-5-2013 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 07:37 PM
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Originally posted by extraterrestrialentity
reply to post by operation mindcrime
 


Once again, that is not possible. The supernova in the other thread is expected to happen in the future, the supernova in this thread has already happened.

Your opinion on whether or not they are the same supernovas is irrelevant. You can be pretty sure that they are the same, but the fact is that the two supernovas occurred at different times (both supernovas have already occurred billions of years ago, so the term "occurred" is applicable here).


Your opinion is irrelevent, they are the same. You should lose the arrogance when you don't have a clue what your talking about.






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