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WOW : Every meteorite since 861 AD: watch them fall

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posted on May, 9 2013 @ 02:47 PM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


OMG, is this one of the first fruits of time travel technology?! Has the time for this momentous occasion finally arrived?

This is fantastic! I can only await for when the technology advances enough to allow us to go back in times BC.




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 02:53 PM
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Originally posted by Turq1
reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


OMG, is this one of the first fruits of time travel technology?! Has the time for this momentous occasion finally arrived?

This is fantastic! I can only await for when the technology advances enough to allow us to go back in times BC.



lol i am afraid its not that exciting,

The data comes from The Meteorite Bulletin, constructed and maintained by the Nomenclature Committee of the Meteoritical Society.

The database indexes several catalogues, including the Catalogue of Meteorites from the Natural History Museum in London, the commercial program MetBase, the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, and the Meteoritical Bulletin.

It contains detailed information about the meteorites, including narratives of the discovery, mineralogy, petrology, specimen locations, chemical and isotopic composition, and references to the literature. The primary source of information in this database is the Catalogue of Meteorites.

This is the source of the information..

Regards

QS



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 02:55 PM
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What is the huge one around 1950? I would have guessed the largest meteorite impact in modern times was Tunguska but that took place in 1908.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 02:59 PM
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Originally posted by AntoniusBlock
What is the huge one around 1950? I would have guessed the largest meteorite impact in modern times was Tunguska but that took place in 1908.


Tunguska is on there, but the weight of the find is small, this is because in that event it exploded in the Air above Tunguska and the small remains are what was recorded.

This animation only shows actual Hits on Earth and the size/composition of the hit.




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 03:00 PM
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Originally posted by AntoniusBlock
What is the huge one around 1950? I would have guessed the largest meteorite impact in modern times was Tunguska but that took place in 1908.



If you "click" above the event, information appears below in order of size if I am not mistaken.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 03:05 PM
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Originally posted by AntoniusBlock
What is the huge one around 1950? I would have guessed the largest meteorite impact in modern times was Tunguska but that took place in 1908.


1947 in the Russian federation

Sikhote-Alin is an iron meteorite that fell in 1947 on the Sikhote-Alin Mountains in eastern Siberia. Though large iron meteorite falls had been witnessed previously and fragments recovered, never before in recorded history had a fall of this magnitude been observed.

An estimated 70 tonnes of material survived the fiery passage through the atmosphere and reached the Earth.

To answer your question sir.

I was also shocked after watching the animation I had not heard of this hit before , made mostly of Iron sounds nasty



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 04:20 PM
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lol , remined me of this old game




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 04:41 PM
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It may be a little late in the game OP...and although I do not know the sorcery involved to embed the animation, I was able to make a Youtube video of it.


Looks pretty decent in HD and fullscreen...




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 06:24 PM
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Here is a documentary made in Russia about the big meteorite of 1947. There is a longer version (18 minutes) at the following link, according to the notes.

www.meteorites.com.au...&ends/sikhote-alin.html

The documentary is in Russian with English subtitles. It's black and white and photographed under difficult circumstances in the Taiga. It is mostly about the scientific follow-up to the event.




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


Only 1,045 have been seen falling? I've seen more than that all by myself.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 09:32 PM
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Originally posted by Im2keul

Originally posted by Quantum_Squirrel

Originally posted by ressiv
was the tunggusta explosion on it?



T hat explosion is not in the animation as the Tunguska meteorite is thought to have exploded above ground, the animation shows meteorites that impacted earth only. So even though its a big event in recent history it is not shown.


Good Morning Quantum_ Squirrel, I got to looking and it does show the Tunguska event on there, although it's listed at only 13 gr .I imagine for the reason you said, it exploded in air and not much left to hit Earth?





The criteria for this animation - while cool as hell, and well done - is flawed for not including the Tunguska event.

While actually impacting the Earth or not (it didn't), how do you not include...

"...the largest 'impact event' on or near Earth in recorded history"
-Source: Everything I can find on the web.

Ridic.


S&F for the providing the link.


The largest Impact on there...

...you know, the one from 1947 [Sikhote-Alin, Russia] that lights up your whole screen...?
...that's in a category all on its own? That was 23 Tons

The Tunguska Event was anywhere from 3 to 30MEGATons!!!

1,000 times big than the Bombs we dropped on Japan. [The Little Boy atomic bomb dropped on Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, and the Fat Man atomic bomb dropped on Nagasaki on August 9, 1945, both exploded with an energy of about 12.5 kilotons of TNT]
edit on 5/9/2013 by SquirrelNutz because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 10:01 PM
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Has anyone seen this.

www.space.com...


For 15 years, scientists have benefited from data gleaned by U.S. classified satellites of natural fireball events in Earth's atmosphere – but no longer.

A recent U.S. military policy decision now explicitly states that observations by hush-hush government spacecraft of incoming bolides and fireballs are classified secret and are not to be released, SPACE.com has learned.

The satellites' main objectives include detecting nuclear bomb tests, and their characterizations of asteroids and lesser meteoroids as they crash through the atmosphere has been a byproduct data bonanza for scientists.

The upshot: Space rocks that explode in the atmosphere are now classified.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 01:09 AM
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What happened in the early 50's?



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 05:58 AM
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The one in 1947 at Russia was a whopper wasn't it! I had never heard of it until now..

This leads me to question though...what has space got against Russia? It seems to target them the most with the large fragments.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 09:36 AM
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Originally posted by woogleuk
The one in 1947 at Russia was a whopper wasn't it! I had never heard of it until now..

This leads me to question though...what has space got against Russia? It seems to target them the most with the large fragments.



See my post 3 above yours.

This particular event - the largest, BY FAR, in that animation - was a matchstick being struck compared to the Tunguska event that was 1,000,000X (yes, that's 1 MILLION) times more destrucitve!



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 02:23 PM
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Originally posted by SquirrelNutz

Originally posted by woogleuk
The one in 1947 at Russia was a whopper wasn't it! I had never heard of it until now..

This leads me to question though...what has space got against Russia? It seems to target them the most with the large fragments.



See my post 3 above yours.

This particular event - the largest, BY FAR, in that animation - was a matchstick being struck compared to the Tunguska event that was 1,000,000X (yes, that's 1 MILLION) times more destrucitve!


Russia is very lucky that it mostly exploded in the air i bet it was miles high and still flattened the trees, look how all the glass windows blow in the most recent one and that looks small and far away



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 03:20 PM
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Originally posted by ItCameFromOuterSpace
Only 1,045 have been seen falling? I've seen more than that all by myself.


That would be 1,045 fireballs which dropped rocks on the ground (that were later found). Most meteors/fireballs do not result in meteorites being found on the ground. Also, most meteorites that have been found were not witnessed as they entered the atmosphere.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 04:13 PM
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Originally posted by SquirrelNutz
The largest Impact on there...

...you know, the one from 1947 [Sikhote-Alin, Russia] that lights up your whole screen...?
...that's in a category all on its own? That was 23 Tons

The Tunguska Event was anywhere from 3 to 30MEGATons!!!
I think you're confusing mass tons with explosive force measured in tons of TNT equivalent.

The 1947 meteorite was perhaps 100 tons of mass before impact, of which maybe 23-70 tons reached the ground, but the explosive force was about like 10,000 Tons of TNT.

The 1908 Tunguska event was estimated to be less than 1 million tons in mass, according to this link:

www.foxnews.com...

But your figure about the explosive force is the correct range estimate for explosive force equivalent weight of TNT for Tunguska, though the source below gives a little tighter range as most likely.

It does seem odd that they show the Tunguska event as so small on the animation when it was so large.

I'm not sure if their decision to base the size of the impact on what reached the ground makes any sense...to me it doesn't make sense.

Here's a list of impacts which shows the yield of the explosion. This makes more sense to me:

en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 10-5-2013 by Arbitrageur because: clarification



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


Thank you for the clarification.



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 10:31 AM
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reply to post by SquirrelNutz
 


I'm well versed in the Tunguska event...would have been a sight to behold.

However, I think you are confusing the weight of the object with the explosion created.

Easily done I guess (although hell of a difference, lol).

EDIT: oops, just scrolled down and seen Arbitrageur explained it.
edit on 11/5/13 by woogleuk because: (no reason given)





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