WOW : Every meteorite since 861 AD: watch them fall

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posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:08 PM
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WOW : Every meteorite since 861 AD: watch them fall



Guardian Article


I wish i could embed the animation here on ATS maybe someone more savvy could help
one of the best i have ever seen tbh





It sure puts things into perspective and that's only ones we have discovered and the miniscule amount that have been witnessed..


The recent Russian meteorite makes me think wow what a rare occurrence, but it seems we are bombarded regularly something i have suspected for some time, its just as the reporting and ability to catalog and record directly from witnesses (camera's /mobiles etc) has improved giving us a more accurate picture.

Space is a pretty turbulent place we are probably lucky to have achieved this state of civilization before being wiped out due to the constant hits..... our ancestor where probably not so lucky..
edit on 8/5/13 by Quantum_Squirrel because: Improving Op





posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:10 PM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


snf for the interesting data Quantum_Squirrel ...



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:13 PM
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Originally posted by Ophiuchus 13
reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


snf for the interesting data Quantum_Squirrel ...



Why ty sir

I would pay real money if someone could tell me a way of embedding the animation page in my Op.
edit on 8/5/13 by Quantum_Squirrel because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:28 PM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


I can't help with the video, but wanted say what a cool topic this is.


Is it that we are getting more hits now, or that we are recording them better?



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:31 PM
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Watched some sort of science show where this scientist demonstrated how much "stuff" (read: meteorites) fallls from space. All he did was take a garden hose and spray down his roof and collected the runoff. Then he got a magnet and ran it through that runoff and whatever stuck to the magnet came from space. It surprised me how much there actually was.

A lot of stuff falls from the sky...
edit on 8-5-2013 by Terminal1 because: kindle finger slip repairs



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:32 PM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


Sorry, there's no way it can be embedded here on ATS. So punters out there will have to click to visit the site. But, its pretty worth it!

Although, please nobody jump to conclusions that there's a massive increase. Don't forget to take into account the rise of print media, the rise in populations and the increase in city size (which would enable a more social environment to discus sightings).

Thanks for posting



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:33 PM
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Originally posted by Terminal1
Watched some sort of science show where this scientist demonstrated how much "stuff" (read: meteorites). All he did was take a garden hose and spray down his roof and collected the runoff. Then he got a magnet and ran it through that runoff and whatever stuck to the magnet came from space. It surprised me bow much there actually was.

A lot of stuff falls from the sky...


I read something like that. Somewhere in the tons a year.

Here is a link.

wiki.answers.com...
edit on 8-5-2013 by Im2keul because: found link



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:38 PM
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@ Im2keul



Is it that we are getting more hits now, or that we are recording them better?


In my opinion we are getting LESS hits now if we had the recording equipment we have now thousands of years ago something in my gut tells me it used to be a lot worse and things are probably scaling down.


@ Terminal1


A lot of stuff falls from the sky...


We are made of stardust! ..Everything falls from space into what we are today so it does not surprise me that this is discovered everywhere.

@ Qumulys



Although, please nobody jump to conclusions that there's a massive increase. Don't forget to take into account the rise of print media, the rise in populations and the increase in city size (which would enable a more social environment to discus sightings


I 100% agree with this analysis.

This animation is why the human race needs to look outwards rather than inwards with killings over unimportant pieces of rock on this tiny speck of dust floating in the cosmos.

Before there is no human race



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:47 PM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


That's what I would think as well, however I was refering to the chart. Thank you and Qumulys for the responses.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:50 PM
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Originally posted by Qumulys
reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


Sorry, there's no way it can be embedded here on ATS. So punters out there will have to click to visit the site. But, its pretty worth it!

I tried, but it said my browser was too old to see it. First time I ever got that. It wants me to update with theirs, so no thanks. There's no way to grab it for this thread? It sounds very interesting.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:51 PM
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Did we start witnessing more meteorites as time went on due to intelligence and the gradual incline of human population?

Or was there just more meteorites in general bombarding Earth?
edit on 8-5-2013 by yourmaker because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:52 PM
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Originally posted by Im2keul
reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


I can't help with the video, but wanted say what a cool topic this is.


Is it that we are getting more hits now, or that we are recording them better?


Could be both, good point though.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:54 PM
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Originally posted by Im2keul
reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


That's what I would think as well, however I was referring to the chart. Thank you and Qumulys for the responses.


The glaring thing i am missing with the 'Less' statement is I guess it depends on the region of space our planet/solar system/galaxy is traversing this could dramatically affect the number of impacts i guess.

Also the mind boggles as this animation shows that we have only witnessed 2.99% (even with modern recording technology) of Meteorite strikes that have been 'FOUND' i wonder how many have not been found?

The maths seem to say we are extremely ignorant of incoming objects from space.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:55 PM
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Originally posted by yourmaker
Did we start witnessing more meteorites as time went on due to intelligence and the gradual incline of human population?

Or was there just more meteorites in general bombarding Earth?
edit on 8-5-2013 by yourmaker because: (no reason given)


Did you try both links?? the guardian newspaper article (they have it embedded) or the direct link to the animation creators website?



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by Im2keul
 


Your welcome!

What is needed is something like this video which (at around 3:20 made me jump, I had my volume up too high!). But technically I have no idea how it could be done accurately with meteors/ites.




posted on May, 8 2013 @ 07:58 PM
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reply to post by Quantum_Squirrel
 


I logged in just to star and flag this.
i would like to see more visualizations done similarly. It would be neat to see ufo sightings depicted against a circle graph, or something similar.

Maybe we could get an sad face built out of appearing emoticons...
Good find!



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 08:09 PM
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I went outside last night to sky watch, and saw 2 meteors in 10 minutes.
Over the years I would have seen 1000s, from large fireballs, to small streaks of light.

From Green tinged balls, to bright white, to yellow ones.

No doubt this space debris adds 1000s+ tons of Dirt, water, minerals and stuff to Earth every year.

Dont forget, we see them easily at night, but they are still falling during the day too,.....everywhere.

Our Fascinating Universe.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 08:10 PM
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reply to post by Qumulys
 




The data comes from The Meteorite Bulletin, constructed and maintained by the Nomenclature Committee of the Meteoritical Society.

The database indexes several catalogues, including the Catalogue of Meteorites from the Natural History Museum in London, the commercial program MetBase, the Antarctic Meteorite Newsletter, and the Meteoritical Bulletin. It contains detailed information about the meteorites, including narratives of the discovery, mineralogy, petrology, specimen locations, chemical and isotopic composition, and references to the literature. The primary source of information in this database is the Catalogue of Meteorites.


I guess they took all available official meteorite data into consideration.. again i say what about the stuff they don't see even with modern recording methods? the actual figures are probably insane.



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 08:14 PM
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Nice i just discovered (stupid me)

If you click and hover on the 'Year' in the animation it tells you the location of the discovery's and the weight of the impact..

AWESOME SAUCE!!!

1947 in the Russian federation does not seem a great place to be ... 23 Ton meteorite hit .. Wowsers.



Sikhote-Alin is an iron meteorite that fell in 1947 on the Sikhote-Alin Mountains in eastern Siberia. Though large iron meteorite falls had been witnessed previously and fragments recovered, never before in recorded history had a fall of this magnitude been observed.[3] An estimated 70 tonnes of material survived the fiery passage through the atmosphere and reached the Earth.[2]


Wiki link on 1947 Meteorite
edit on 8/5/13 by Quantum_Squirrel because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 8 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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reply to post by Qumulys
 


Pretty neat video. It does have a 4th of July sound if the volume is up.





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