Supernova 10/12 may 2013

page: 3
15
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join

posted on May, 10 2013 @ 08:52 PM
link   
reply to post by dc4lifeskater
 

Starred your response even though the spelling wasn't even close... Party on dude!!!




posted on May, 11 2013 @ 12:40 AM
link   

Originally posted by AshOnMyTomatoes

Originally posted by wewillnotcomply666

Originally posted by iforget
reply to post by wewillnotcomply666
 


They expect a visible supernova to reach observatories because the gamma ray burst that has been detected precedes a supernova. It has already happened in our timeline long ago in fact


ahh ok dude , thanks .
So in a supernove there are two different flashes of light that reach us at different times? sorry but im a noob at this stuff
The gamma ray burst is extremely high energy radiation. As such, it doesn't interact quite the same with the interstellar/intergalactic material between us and the star it originated at. The visible light from the supernova will have been absorbed and re-emitted by any cloud of dust and gas in the intervening 3.6 billion light-years of space, whereas dust does not play well with gamma rays.

Think of it as the difference between firing a bullet through the air, and an arrow through the air. The bullet is just inherently more suited to slicing through the air without slowing down too much.


Thanks mate, makes sense now . Cheers



posted on May, 11 2013 @ 04:25 AM
link   

Originally posted by wewillnotcomply666

Originally posted by AshOnMyTomatoes

Originally posted by wewillnotcomply666

Originally posted by iforget
reply to post by wewillnotcomply666
 


They expect a visible supernova to reach observatories because the gamma ray burst that has been detected precedes a supernova. It has already happened in our timeline long ago in fact


ahh ok dude , thanks .
So in a supernove there are two different flashes of light that reach us at different times? sorry but im a noob at this stuff
The gamma ray burst is extremely high energy radiation. As such, it doesn't interact quite the same with the interstellar/intergalactic material between us and the star it originated at. The visible light from the supernova will have been absorbed and re-emitted by any cloud of dust and gas in the intervening 3.6 billion light-years of space, whereas dust does not play well with gamma rays.

Think of it as the difference between firing a bullet through the air, and an arrow through the air. The bullet is just inherently more suited to slicing through the air without slowing down too much.


Thanks mate, makes sense now . Cheers



Sorry, but that's wrong. Both the visible light and gamma rays get here at the same time. If you actually read the articles posted here, they say that the gamma ray burst precedes the peak in visible light radiation. Think of it as the initial explosion burst before the huge bright fireball appears.



posted on May, 13 2013 @ 06:22 PM
link   

Originally posted by andy06shake
reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Mate if we can observe Supernova from Earth with only the naked eye, that's not good and I imagine total destruction of our world would follow.

I think I read/herd that if a Supernova did take place within 50 light years of our system It could quite possible destroy all life on our planet, especially if our system lies within the radiation cone.

Never mind the fact that any Supernova would have taken place thousands of years in the past since it takes the light and radiation time to reach us.

Just my two cents.
edit on 9-5-2013 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)


If no one mentioned it, this one was seen by the naked eye.

en.wikipedia.org...'s_Supernova





new topics
 
15
<< 1  2   >>

log in

join