Supernova 10/12 may 2013

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posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:35 AM
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reply to post by rickymouse
 


I think the link was to a circular that NASA put out to other observatories to "look up" as they had indications that the glow was coming.

We won't see anything, unless the calculations are wrong. But it is the most powerful ever observed according to space.com




posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:55 AM
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I have a question I know somebody would be able to answer here

On space.com it said that the star is 3.6billion LY from us, if this is the case does this mean it actually exploded 3.6billion years ago and it is only now the light has traveled far enough for us to see?

This is cool though I'd love to see one in the night sky!



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 08:57 AM
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reply to post by Sparta
 


Yes that's correct, it's a blast from the past lol.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 10:05 AM
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I hope the life forms inhabiting the planets around that star escaped in time.



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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reply to post by AshOnMyTomatoes
 


Thats kind of creepy! I had a dream last night about a supernova! A dark dream with a beautiful red, blue and white supernova!



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:20 AM
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reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Mate if we can observe Supernova from Earth with only the naked eye, that's not good and I imagine total destruction of our world would follow.

I think I read/herd that if a Supernova did take place within 50 light years of our system It could quite possible destroy all life on our planet, especially if our system lies within the radiation cone.

Never mind the fact that any Supernova would have taken place thousands of years in the past since it takes the light and radiation time to reach us.

Just my two cents.
edit on 9-5-2013 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:24 AM
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Hang on ...... How do they know its coming if it hasnt "happened" yet . In our timeline anyway . If we are yet to see the light , how do we know it is coming

Yes im a noob
edit on 15/03/2013 by wewillnotcomply666 because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:32 AM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 


Here's a artist impression of a supernova explosion...



www.youtube.com...

To see that in the sky from a safe distance would be spectacular. I wouldn't want to be too close either.
edit on 9-5-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:36 AM
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Originally posted by andy06shake
reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Mate if we can observe Supernova from Earth with only the naked eye, that's not good and I imagine total destruction of our world would follow.

I think I read/herd that if a Supernova did take place within 50 light years of our system It could quite possible destroy all life on our planet, especially if our system lies within the radiation cone.

Never mind the fact that any Supernova would have taken place thousands of years in the past since it takes the light and radiation time to reach us.

Just my two cents.
edit on 9-5-2013 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)


Not true, as naked-eye supernovae have happened in human history before. The most famous example is the one from 1054 AD that formed the Crab Nebula (M1).

en.wikipedia.org...
en.wikipedia.org...

A more recent one is from 1572L en.wikipedia.org...



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:40 AM
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reply to post by wewillnotcomply666
 


They expect a visible supernova to reach observatories because the gamma ray burst that has been detected precedes a supernova. It has already happened in our timeline long ago in fact



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:42 AM
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reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Looks cool if the world does end I suppose a fantastic light show is the way to go, need some really strong Sun block I imagine!


On another note if NASA is indeed able to detect these things before they become visible they must have some kind of advanced tachyon detection technologies in orbit and supernova must emit said particles since you cannot detect light waves until they reach us. Maybe that's how they have advance knowledge of said nova?

Anybody else got an idea of how they could detect these things before the light reaches our vicinity?
edit on 9-5-2013 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 11:47 AM
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reply to post by iforget
 

"They expect a visible supernova to reach observatories because the gamma ray burst that has been detected precedes a supernova. It has already happened in our timeline long ago in fact"

So they observe the gamma rays before the light waves, makes sense now.

Any idea how far away the star/stars that went nova were?

Just saying it would not bode well for us if one of these events took place in our neck of the woods.
edit on 9-5-2013 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 9 2013 @ 12:13 PM
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reply to post by andy06shake
 





Anybody else got an idea of how they could detect these things before the light reaches our vicinity?


I can only guess That the GRB is detectable before the visible light is. There is a supernova early warning system that detects the initial energy release just before the the star goes supernova, but this says it's gives only a few hr notice. That's a big diference to the weeks notice NASA have given.


The neutrino signal for a core collapse event precedes its electromagnetic fireworks by hours, or perhaps tens of hours.

The burst of neutrinos itself lasts tens of seconds.

The pointing from the neutrinos will be a few degrees in an optimistic case.

There may be no pointing information at all, or the pointing information may be not be available immediately.

Currently running experiments are sensitive to a core collapse in theMilkyWay, or just beyond.

The next generation of detectors may reach to Mpc range.

A few Galactic supernovae are expected per century. SNEWS is online, and can provide an alert within minutes of a Galactic core collapse.


astroengine.com...
edit on 9-5-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)
edit on 9-5-2013 by Wifibrains because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 02:14 AM
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Our Alien allies that are controlling our space exploration sometime give us tidbits to satisfy our curiosity. This is how we know about the supernova.

Disclaimer: this is a joke.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 03:50 AM
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reply to post by Wifibrains
 


Perhaps the time in NASA's notice is to the peak of the visible radiation, not to the beginning.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 07:39 AM
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reply to post by iforget
 


Sorry if this is a dumb question, but does that mean that gamma rays travel faster than the speed of light? (you know to be able to travel for "3.6 billion years" and still be here before the light hits us?)

So Gamma Rays out ran the light?
Can someone please explain how long between the release of gamma rays and visible light during a supernova. I thought that going supernova happens pretty quick since we can only see the visible light for 2 days, right? What am I missing?



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 07:47 AM
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Originally posted by IZombie
Our Alien allies that are controlling our space exploration sometime give us tidbits to satisfy our curiosity. This is how we know about the supernova.

Disclaimer: this is a joke.


Theres many a true word said in jest,You never know



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 10:34 AM
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Originally posted by iforget
reply to post by wewillnotcomply666
 


They expect a visible supernova to reach observatories because the gamma ray burst that has been detected precedes a supernova. It has already happened in our timeline long ago in fact


ahh ok dude , thanks .
So in a supernove there are two different flashes of light that reach us at different times? sorry but im a noob at this stuff



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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Originally posted by wewillnotcomply666

Originally posted by iforget
reply to post by wewillnotcomply666
 


They expect a visible supernova to reach observatories because the gamma ray burst that has been detected precedes a supernova. It has already happened in our timeline long ago in fact


ahh ok dude , thanks .
So in a supernove there are two different flashes of light that reach us at different times? sorry but im a noob at this stuff
The gamma ray burst is extremely high energy radiation. As such, it doesn't interact quite the same with the interstellar/intergalactic material between us and the star it originated at. The visible light from the supernova will have been absorbed and re-emitted by any cloud of dust and gas in the intervening 3.6 billion light-years of space, whereas dust does not play well with gamma rays.

Think of it as the difference between firing a bullet through the air, and an arrow through the air. The bullet is just inherently more suited to slicing through the air without slowing down too much.



posted on May, 10 2013 @ 04:56 PM
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Originally posted by AshOnMyTomatoes
reply to post by Wifibrains
 


I had a dream about a bright supernova the other night, that was bigger and brighter than Venus in the sky. Their predicted peak magnitude is only 22 though, which is not even visible to the naked eye. Still strange coincidence.


I had the same dream. What night exactly was your dream?





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