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Do Words Hurt?

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posted on Nov, 24 2013 @ 08:32 PM
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reply to post by BDBinc
 


I certainly haven't read every page of this thread.

Don't plan to.

I am curious, however . . . if anyone ever dealt with the FACT

that

angry, insulting, assaultive, hurtful words can be remembered and CONTINUE TO DO EMOTIONAL AND RELATIONSHIP DAMAGE long after the speaker of those words is dead.

And, that ATTACHMENT DISORDER FOSTERED WORDS by dysfunctional parents even cause literal physiological BRAIN DAMAGE in the EMOTIONAL centers of the brain that handle emotional expression AS WELL AS the center of the brain that handles, manages interpersonal relationships. MRI studies have affirmed that.

A broken bone will heal in a matter of months. Cuts and bruises faster.

DESTRUCTION BY WORDS may not heal in a lifetime.




posted on Nov, 24 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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Language is symbolic. The words themselves are merely patterns of sounds, and that cannot hurt you physically.

It's the symbols and the concepts they represent that can be emotionally damaging.

The thing you have to try to always understand is that when you allow the words spoken by another to hurt you, you are in essence giving that person power over you. You are giving them an immense amount of control by allowing them manipulate your emotional well-being and through that possibly even your very actions.

Words can be very powerful to people who know this and know how to manipulate this especially to people who haven't fully grasped this basic truth. Look at some of the most powerful and nefarious leaders in history who knew how to demagogue the mob. They were using the power of words on the people who didn't understand what was going on.

The people who are mast dangerous with their words are the ones you are closest to in life. They have the greatest power to hurt you or impact you with words. Sometimes, this is for the best as these are the people you should pay the greatest attention to, and they should be the ones who care about you and want what's best for you. At the same time, it can also be the most damaging when you are close to a toxic person.

But when you let someone who shouldn't matter to you any more than the next stranger call you out and hurt you through something they say, you should know better. You should at the very least know when to walk away. Why should they matter? Why give them that power?



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:48 AM
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reply to post by BDBinc
 





How do you continue to separate words from their meaning and the intention behind them in the context of this thread(suicide after ongoing verbal abuse to a depressed person)?


Quite easily.


The person who hears and understands the abusive words is not hurting themselves, your' echo" of traumatized person's idea is much like saying the rape victim is asking for it. The person that hears the abusive hurtful words is not to be blamed for them, they did not speak them, just as a rape victim should not be blamed [as they are by some]. You are blaming the hearer and not the speaker, absolving yourself of the pain it causes another person when you use abusive and hurtful words hurt them.


You're comparing apples and oranges. Maybe you don't see the difference between hearing words and being raped. There is a big difference. Rape isn't the same as verbal insults. Ask anyone.

The one who speaks abusively to another is guilty of speaking abusively to another. That is it.



When one hurts another physically is it the injured person who is hurt by them at fault . If a person intentionally abuses and hurts another with their speechwords is it that also the fault of the hurt person because they understand.
It is very clear that you wish to absolve yourself from the action of your words when they hurt other persons.


That is not the case at all. I think you're simply making stuff up again to add weight to your already faulty argument. I already said in the OP that if someone tries to use abusive words, they thereby show their abusiveness with their verbal display of stupidity. That reflects on them and not the one who the words are spoken against. Words spoken are always reflective of the one who speaks them, not the one who hears them.

You're trying to pin me as a bad guy because you don't agree with what I'm saying. I'm fine with that, but it reflects more on you than it does on me. You don't know me, yet you make these declarations, so I can assume quite reasonably that you don't really know what you're talking about. You're words come out of you and then fall flat on the floor not affecting anything but yourself. There's no power to them because I don't give them power. I believe that seeing words for what they are will give armor to the one being bullied, but I've already mentioned this many times.


You still think words are isolated from their meanings and context of the person speaking - and in the thread you are referring to an example a case of online verbal abuse ending in suicide.

You cannot keep thinking words create themselves independently without the mind which they are the tools of.


This is simply untrue. How is it you know what I think? Right. You don't. Once again your words are reflecting on you and not me.


This is YOUR whole argument, now you don’t want me to say you claim you haven’t been hurt by words[though you know you have].


No I just don't want you to speak for me. Telling you how wrong you are is very tiresome and getting a little too repetitive. I want to hear about your experiences rather than what some person over the internet imagines mine to be.



My person has been hurt by hateful abusive words, as words have meanings to the mind.
If the word meaning is abusive and hateful directed towards you it hurts.
You seem to want to believe, even against your own personal experience, that your abusive words have not hurt the person, that its just their problem (in isolation to you speaking abusive words at them).


First of all, I don't hurl abusive words at anyone, so I'd appreciate if you quit implying I do. But if you cannot overpower a pile of letters, cannot differentiate between opinion and truth, and choose to on your own accord hurt your own self because of it, then my friend you wouldn't survive a day in the real world.

See things for what they are and not what you make them out to be. There is a reason words mean different things to different people, because it is they who give the words meaning. So who has the power, the words or the one who gives them meaning?



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:55 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 





angry, insulting, assaultive, hurtful words can be remembered and CONTINUE TO DO EMOTIONAL AND RELATIONSHIP DAMAGE long after the speaker of those words is dead.


No one said words aren't remembered. Are words used in traumatic experiences? Yes. Are they the cause of traumatic experiences? No.


And, that ATTACHMENT DISORDER FOSTERED WORDS by dysfunctional parents even cause literal physiological BRAIN DAMAGE in the EMOTIONAL centers of the brain that handle emotional expression AS WELL AS the center of the brain that handles, manages interpersonal relationships. MRI studies have affirmed that.


It is the abuse and not the words that cause the damage. I can speak the foulest and most vile words to myself and not a single pain, emotional or physical, will ever be felt. If words caused harm, I would be harmed by words. But they simply don't. How do you explain that?



A broken bone will heal in a matter of months. Cuts and bruises faster.

DESTRUCTION BY WORDS may not heal in a lifetime.


This is superstition and fear mongering, placing the blame on a scapegoat that cannot even defend itself.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 01:32 AM
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reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 






You continue to separate words from their meaning and the intention behind them in the context of this thread(suicided after ongoing verbal abuse ).

The person who hears and understands the abusive words is not hurting themselves, your' echo" of traumatized person's idea is much like saying the rape victim is asking for it. The person that hears the abusive hurtful words is not to be blamed for them, they did not speak them, just as a rape victim should not be blamed [as they are by some]. You are blaming the hearer and not the speaker, absolving yourself of the pain it causes another person when you use abusive and hurtful words hurt them.

Maybe you don't see the difference between blaming a rape victim and blaming a verbally abused person( suicided) .


When one hurts another physically is it the injured person who is hurt by them at fault . If a person intentionally abuses and hurts another with their speech/words is it that also the fault of the hurt person because they have the misfortune to understand the meaning of hurtful abusive words.
You still wish to absolve yourself from the action of your words when/if they hurt other persons?

Words spoken are not always reflective of the one who speaks them, as they can be copied. Such as when one who is abused then abuses others, people mimic . It is irrelevant of the messed state of mind of a person that abuses others and thinks its their problem. Words hurt and we are not disagreeing or talking about just how f*&ked up the abusers are= just that abusive words hurt the person.



You still think words are isolated from their meanings and context of the person speaking - and in the thread you are referring to an example a case of online verbal abuse ending in suicide.
You cannot keep thinking words create themselves independently without the mind which they are the tools of.



My person has been hurt by hateful abusive words, as words have meanings to the mind.
If the word meaning is abusive and hateful directed towards you it hurts.
You seem to want to believe, even against your own personal experience, that [*your] abusive words have not hurt the person, that its just their problem (in isolation to [*your] speaking abusive words at them *assuming of course that as your outrageous claim you have never in your life been hurt by words -or hurt someone with them.

No there is not different meanings to hurtful words .The abuse hurled at the suicide victim would have the same meaning to most non-psychopathic persons.

I like how in the thread you have desperately fallen to try to paint yourself the victim, much as you want the speaker of abusive words to be seen.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 01:52 AM
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It's easiest to justify something hurtful with that handy pseudo-Buddhist 'blame the victim' philosophy when you're on the delivering end of the the exchange. That said, my answer to your post question is a big, fat yes.


edit on 25-11-2013 by EllaMarina because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 08:24 AM
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LesMisanthrope
ote]

No one said words aren't remembered. Are words used in traumatic experiences? Yes. Are they the cause of traumatic experiences? No.


I still fiercely disagree.

I'm not saying it is words in the abstract that cause pain and enduring pain.

A knife in the abstract causes no pain.

A knife wielded in a deliberately painful way against a vulnerable heart, tissue . . . causes pain . . . even death.

Horridly destructive words wielded in a deliberately painful, ASSAULTIVE way against vulnerable [in years, in emotions, in psychologies, in interpersonal dynamics] children, cause lasting damage and can even trigger death--sometimes directly and certainly by suicide.

You SOUND like you had a rosy childhood.

Yet your behavior on this thread could bespeak of significant attachment disorder. Are you claiming that your childhood was entirely free of destructively spoken harsh words?



It is the abuse and not the words that cause the damage. I can speak the foulest and most vile words to myself and not a single pain, emotional or physical, will ever be felt. If words caused harm, I would be harmed by words. But they simply don't. How do you explain that?


See the above.

WORDS--assaultive, ABUSIVE, harsh, demeaning, insulting, rejecting WORDS cause lasting damage in children. The damage--when the abuse is significant enough--causes lasting physiological brain damage in the emotional expression area and in the relationship management area of the brain.




This is superstition and fear mongering, placing the blame on a scapegoat that cannot even defend itself.


Evidently you are NOT a psychologist or other counselor.

Mental hospitals are full of people . . . people lastingly damaged by the words spoken by those who had the task of being nurturing, protective, uplifting and upbuilding but WHO WERE THE OPPOSITE WITH THEIR HARSH, DESTRUCTIVE AND DESTROYING WORDS.

Most children--particularly young children--are not equipped to resist the assaultive destruction of words--particularly when spoken by parental figures. Essentially the harsh words end up being a kind of curse--perhaps on a spiritual level but certainly in a self-fulfilling prophecy kind of way. The destructive assaultive words become the very definitions of the person as the person sees themselves and as they act out their personality and personhood behaviorally in the world--EXACTLY BECAUSE the parents DEFINED THE VULNERABLE CHILD THAT WAY WITH . . . WORDS!

IF all parents used only or even merely mostly upbuilding nurturing words and affections . . . we could likely empty 95% or more of the beds in the mental hospitals over time.

The whole idea that words do NOT hurt is the most absurd thing I think I've ever read on ATS--amidst a ton of absurdities.

IIRC, a pattern of persistent assaultive, abusive, harsh words against young children is sufficient to trigger removal of the children from the home as far too serious an abuse to leave them in the home.

Evidently you are . . . unaware . . . of the fact that

--alcoholism,
--physical beating abuse
--sexual abuse
--verbal abuse with WORDS
--absence
--emotional cold distance
--workaholism
--drug abuse


ALL CAUSE SERIOUS LEVELS OF ATTACHMENT DISORDER resulting in physiological brain damage and lifelong, lasting problems with relationships and emotional expression.
.


edit on 25/11/2013 by BO XIAN because: tags

edit on 25/11/2013 by BO XIAN because: ditto



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:44 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 


Here's some documentation on the devastating effects on the brain of young children from abuse . . .

INCLUDING VERBAL ABUSE BY WORDS

www.childwelfare.gov...

UNDERSTANDING THE EFFECTS OF MALTREATMENT ON BRAIN DEVELOPMENT

[AN EDUCATIONALLY funded RESEARCH ARTICLE . . . excerpts (less than 10%) posted for EDUCATIONAL, life saving PURPOSES]



. . .
.

The development of synapses occurs at an astounding rate during children’s early years, in response to the young child’s experiences. At its peak, the cerebral cortex of a healthy toddler may create 2 million synapses per second (ZERO TO THREE, 2009) . . .
.
. . .
.

. . . . . . . For example, our brains are “wired” to respond to the sound of speech; when babies hear people speaking, the neural systems in their brains responsible for speech and language receive the necessary stimulation to organize and function (Perry, 2006). The more babies are exposed to people speaking, the stronger their related synapses become. If the appropriate exposure does not happen, the pathways developed in anticipation may be discarded. This is sometimes referred to as the concept of “use it or lose it.” It is through these processes of creating, strengthening, and discarding synapses that our brains adapt to our unique environment.
.
. . .
.
. . . . . . . For example, infants have the genetic predisposition to form strong attachments to their primary caregivers. But if a child’s caregivers are unresponsive or threatening, and the attachment process is disrupted, the child’s ability to form any healthy relationships during his or her life may be impaired (Perry,
2001a).
.
. . .
.
. . . . . . . . But babies who do not get responses to their cries, and babies whose cries are met with abuse, learn different lessons. The neuronal pathways that are developed and strengthened under negative Effects of Maltreatment On Brain Development conditions prepare children to cope in that negative environment, and their ability to respond to nurturing and kindness may be impaired (Shonkoff & Phillips, 2000).
.
. . .
.

. . . . . . . . while emotional abuse generally refers to any injury to a child’s psychological or emotional stability (Child Welfare Information Gateway, 2008). Chronic stress may also qualify as emotional abuse. In some States, alcohol or substance abuse or domestic violence that affects the unborn child is considered child abuse.

.
. . .
.
. . . . . . . . . We know that children who experience the stress of abuse will focus their brains’ resources on survival and responding to threats in their environment. This chronic stimulation of the brain’s fear
response means that the regions of the brain involved in this response are frequently activated (Perry, 2001a).

.
. . .
.

One way that early maltreatment experiences may alter a child’s ability to interact positively with others is by altering brain neurochemical balance. Research on children who suffered early emotional abuse or severe deprivation indicates that such maltreatment may permanently alter the brain’s ability to use serotonin, which helps produce feelings of well-being and emotional stability (Healy, 2004).
.
. . .
.

. . . . . . . . But if this environment persists, and the child’s brain is focused on developing and strengthening its strategies for survival, other strategies may not develop as fully. The result may be a child who has difficulty functioning when presented with a world of kindness, nurturing, and stimulation
.
. . .
.
[I added paragraphing to the following too long paragraph for easier reading]
.
Persistent Fear Response. Chronic stress or repeated traumas can result in a number of biological reactions, including a persistent fear state (Perry, 2006). Neurochemical systems are affected, which can cause a cascade of changes in attention, impulse control, sleep, and fine motor control (Perry, 2000a; 2000b).
.
Chronic activation of certain parts of the brain involved in the fear response (such as the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] axis) can “wear out” other parts of the brain such as the hippocampus, which is involved in cognition and memory (Perry, 2000b).
.
The HPA axis may react to chronic fear or stress by producing excess cortisol—a hormone that may damage or destroy neurons in critical brain areas (Putnam, 2006). Chronic activation of the neuronal pathways involved in the fear response can create permanent memories that shape the child’s perception of and response to the environment. While this adaptation may be necessary for survival in a hostile world, it can become a way of life that is difficult to change, even if the environment improves
.
. . .
.
. . . . . . . . . Consumed with a need to monitor nonverbal cues for threats, their brains are less able to interpret and respond to verbal cues, even when they are in a supposedly nonthreatening environment, like a classroom. While these children are often labeled as learning disabled, the reality is that their brains have developed so that they are constantly alert and are unable to achieve the relative calm necessary for learning (Child Trauma Academy, n.d.).
.
. . .
.

[added paragraphing]:
.

. . . . . . . . . may lead to impairments in three major areas for the developing child (Cook et al., 2005):
.
• Increased susceptibility to stress• Excessive help-seeking and dependency or excessive social isolation
.
• Inability to regulate emotions Young infants depend on positive interactions with caregivers to begin to develop appropriate emotional control and response (affect regulation) (Applegate & Shapiro,
2005).
.

For instance, lots of appropriate face-to-face and other contact helps infants recognize and respond to emotional cues. Infants whose caregivers are neglectful or abusive may experience affect dysregulation--meaning that these children are not able to identify and respond appropriately to emotional cues (Applegate & Shapiro, 2005). Ongoing maltreatment may result in insecure or anxious attachment because the child is not able to derive a feeling of security and consistency from the caregiver.
.

Children who have experienced insecure or anxious attachments may have more difficulties
regulating their emotions and showing empathy for others’ feelings (Applegate & Shapiro, 2005). These children may have difficulties forming attachments later in life as well.
.
. . .
.


CONTINUED NEXT POST.

edit on 25/11/2013 by BO XIAN because: formatting lines



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:47 AM
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reply to post by BDBinc
 





I like how in the thread you have desperately fallen to try to paint yourself the victim, much as you want the speaker of abusive words to be seen.


First you make me the bully now you make me the victim. Paint me with your brushes all you want, but lies and slander is abusive behaviour.

You do have no argument. I cannot find a single point in your copy/paste posts, and I regret having taken the time to read them. If you can't debate, why even bother?
edit on 25-11-2013 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:49 AM
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reply to post by EllaMarina
 





t's easiest to justify something hurtful with that handy pseudo-Buddhist 'blame the victim' philosophy when you're on the delivering end of the the exchange. That said, my answer to your post question is a big, fat yes.


It's easy to make stuff up and outright dismiss an argument with that "ignorance is bliss" mentality. So my response to you is "So what?"



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:56 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 





A knife wielded in a deliberately painful way against a vulnerable heart, tissue . . . causes pain . . . even death.


Because a knife can physically hurt someone.


Horridly destructive words wielded in a deliberately painful, ASSAULTIVE way against vulnerable [in years, in emotions, in psychologies, in interpersonal dynamics] children, cause lasting damage and can even trigger death--sometimes directly and certainly by suicide.


Then surely you can find me one case of death by words.



You SOUND like you had a rosy childhood.

Yet your behavior on this thread could bespeak of significant attachment disorder. Are you claiming that your childhood was entirely free of destructively spoken harsh words?


Well you're wrong. You sound like you often make connections where there are none.

My behavior? You haven't even met me yet you're making a diagnosis? This seems to be a common trend among those who say words are capable of hurting—giant leaps of faith with no grounds to support them on. You are the third person in this thread who has tried to label me with a mental disorder.

Do you care at all to refute my arguments with your own reason and logic?



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:58 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 


I don't see a single reference to words inflicting harm. I never said abuse doesn't cause harm.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 09:59 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 


Excerpts from:

www.childwelfare.gov...

NOTE: I'm just scratching the surface of the wealth of important info in this very long research summary article. The whole article is worth reading.



.
. . .
.

Some of the specific long-term effects of abuse and neglect on the developing brain can include (Teicher, 2000):
.

• Diminished growth in the left hemisphere, which may increase the risk for depression

.

• Irritability in the limbic system, setting the stage for the emergence of panic disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder

.

• Smaller growth in the hippocampus and limbic abnormalities, which can increase the risk for dissociative disorders and memory impairments

.

• Impairment in the connection between the two brain hemispheres, which has been linked to symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder

.
. . .
.




Then followed a number of pages regarding implications of these research findings.

The evidence is abundantly clear.

Words not only hurt--they are devastating in their hurt over the life time of the individual--even WITH later therapy and hard work to overcome the brain level and interactional deficits.

It is difficult for me to express sufficient OUTRAGE that anyone would subscribe to the absurd notion that words do NOT hurt--particularly children and very particularly young children.

However, it can also be documented that words are destructive, hurtful to MARRIAGES--which--in turn--results in INCREASED ATTACHMENT DISORDER AND BRAIN DAMAGE OF THE CHILDREN INVOLVED.

When, out of 5 interactions, the majority of those interactions end with a bottom line of negative words carrying the inateraction, punctuating the interaction in a lingering memorable way--even an unconsciously memorable way--the odds are that the marriage will end.


WORDS CAN BE DEVASTATINGLY DESTRUCTIVE.

.
.
edit on 25/11/2013 by BO XIAN because: line formatting



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 


Evidently you missed the part about

VERBAL ABUSE.

VERBAL = USE OF WORDS.

What is sooooooooooo obviously difficult about this which prevents your understanding the solidly researched facts involved?

What is WITH that?



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 


The research cited as well as a wealth of many dozens of other studies, if not hundreds . . .


THAT IF VERBAL ABUSE USING WORDS was the ONLY abuse, THE DESTRUCTIVE DEVASTATING EFFECTS ARE THE SAME.

EACH of those TYPES of abuse items I listed are sufficient in and of themselves to result in the SAME kinds of brain and relational devastations documented.

If my humble words are somehow difficult to understand, please let me know. I'll try again. I'm mystified at your failure to understand plain and solid research findings presented in mostly basic English.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 


If this is what you believe, I'm sure you could explain to me how words are capable of hurting, and are the cause of pain.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:14 AM
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LesMisanthrope
reply to post by BO XIAN
 



Because a knife can physically hurt someone.


And, I have documented a brief smattering of the studies DOCUMENTING THAT WORDS CAUSE PHYSIOLOGICAL BRAIN DAMAGE. Yet you refuse to see it or are unable to see it. Mystifying.




Then surely you can find me one case of death by words.


The suicide literature is replete with such cases. And, there are many cases where folks have had heart attacks and instant death from words spoken harshly, abusively. That's somewhat common knowledge. Interesting that you seem unaware of it.

I suspect it's not overly difficult to track such info down. I'm not sure I'll get to it.



Well you're wrong. You sound like you often make connections where there are none.

My behavior? You haven't even met me yet you're making a diagnosis? This seems to be a common trend among those who say words are capable of hurting—giant leaps of faith with no grounds to support them on. You are the third person in this thread who has tried to label me with a mental disorder.


YOU PRESENT THE EVIDENCE OF SUCH FAIRLY ABUNDANTLY IN THIS THREAD.

Actually, your avatar corroborates such an inference.

I'm not that interested in documenting the above. I'll just note that your pattern of writing, communicating and interacting on this thread is VERY CONSISTENT with and similar to, if not identical to, those who have had a significant degree of serious ATTACHMENT DISORDER.

And counselors hear all the time protestations about how wonderful the parental relationships were with children who OBVIOUSLY HAD SIGNIFICANT DEGREES OF ATTACHMENT DISORDER. It usually doesn't take a lot of questions to ferret out where the rot was. However, I'm not interested in doing that with you hereon. You present plenty of evidence without such questioning.



Do you care at all to refute my arguments with your own reason and logic?


I have. I'm not responsible for . . .

stubborn resistance to facts logically presented and documented with solid research evidence.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 10:18 AM
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reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 


I have.

Fairly extensively.

I'm not responsible for inserting a tube and force-feeding TRUTH.

I'm not into using the brick method of causing the camel to drink more water.

Some folks seem to have an inherent allergic response to some types of truth.

It's hard, sometimes, to tell whether it's a bull-headed resistance, refusal to accept and believe the solid evidence presented

or

an incapacity to comprehend it and/or make use of the truth involved.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 11:44 AM
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reply to post by BO XIAN
 


I understand the frustration. I am purposefully being controversial on this subject. But let's discuss this a little further philosophically without appealing to authority too quickly.

Here's why I'm not so willing to accept the principle that words hurt:

Do you believe that if you were to verbally assault a cat they would feel pain? Surely if it was the words that hurt, that cat would feel pain.

Do you believe that if you were to verbally assault someone who didn't understand what you were saying, that they would feel pain? If it was the words that hurt, they would feel pain despite not knowing what you were saying.

If words hurt, the very act of speaking them would cause pain to the one who spoke them.

Now in the case of verbal abuse, which you did indeed provide sufficient evidence for, was it the words that did the damage?

It is difficult to say "no" in this instance because it makes me out to be a proponent of abuse, a bully, and mentally disturbed, as you an others have been quick to paint me with. However, that doesn't make me wrong. I believe saying it is the words that do the damage is entirely superficial, because words mean different things to different people. This raises questions:

How can an insult hurt one person but not another when the exact same words were used?

Why do some words hurt but others do not?

How does a bunch of letters cause physical harm?

How come when we verbally abuse someone who doesn't understand the language, they don't feel pain?

No one has yet articulated why words hurt; they go on to say it is the memory of the experience that does the lasting damage, or other inferences along those lines. Sure, words are a correlation to such events, but that a correlation between two variables does not necessarily imply that one causes the other.



posted on Nov, 25 2013 @ 12:55 PM
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LesMisanthrope
reply to post by BDBinc
 





I like how in the thread you have desperately fallen to try to paint yourself the victim, much as you want the speaker of abusive words to be seen.


First you make me the bully now you make me the victim. Paint me with your brushes all you want, but lies and slander is abusive behaviour.

You do have no argument. I cannot find a single point in your copy/paste posts, and I regret having taken the time to read them. If you can't debate, why even bother?
edit on 25-11-2013 by LesMisanthrope because: (no reason given)

I am not making you anything or making you say what you say.
Strange new accusations you make when you believe lies and slander [which are done with words which you claimed do not hurt].
You have not debated you seem to be denying your own personal experience of the effect of abusive and hurtful words. All that just to try to convince others that abusive and hurtful words don't hurt or abuse a person ....when I reckon you know they do.



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